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  • Yes, the matches vs total testees for a particular country are there (the total testees are in parentheses). However, you have to calculate the percentages yourself. It would be easier and better (especially for those who's math skills are less than advanced), if FTDNA did the calculations and ranking...
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  • Suggestion for Ancestral Origins section of our personal webpages.

    I was thinking that on our "Ancestral Origins" section of our FTDNA personal pages, FTDNA should put the percentages next to the 'count' number (the number of matches one has as compared to the number of people claiming ancestry to a particular country). I'm thinking the count number alone...
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    Last edited by bobr; 13 December 2006, 12:47 PM.

  • The X chromosome has nothing to do with MtDNA. The Mitochondrion (Mitochondria is plural) is the part of the cell that provides energy to the cell. This is passed on as a duplicate from the Mother.
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  • I'm curious as to how you were able to trace your male lineage back to the 10th century. Surnames have only been around since the 12th or 13th century. Before that, I imagine it would be difficult, if not next to impossible to trace male line lineage to the 10th or 11th century....
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  • matching with a male or female in MtDNA makes no difference. You are both (either gender) descended from the same female in the past....
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  • If you only match on HVR1, then there is a 50% chance of you sharing a common female ancestor within the last 52 Generations or so (within 1,000-1,300 years or so). If you also match on HVR2, there is a 50% chance that you share a female ancestor within the last 28 generations (within 600 - 800 years...
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    Last edited by bobr; 13 June 2006, 04:31 PM.

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  • If we descend in part from Neanderthals, who cares? Why should people's 'personal and cultural views' stop science from discovering new things? Neanderthals were settled in Europe far before any Homo Sapiens Sapiens. They are a more ancient species that left Africa thousands of years before modern...
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    Last edited by bobr; 17 May 2006, 05:20 PM.

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  • bobr
    replied to Match didn't respond
    I have had the same issue with some of my matches. If they don't have any information on their family that they can share, I think a 'courtesy' email saying so would be greatly appreciated. A response with no information is better than no response at all. Besides, what is the point of signing the...
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    Last edited by bobr; 4 May 2006, 03:04 PM.

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  • bobr
    replied to Help!
    Yes, this is also a possibility. The african female post-colonization scenario seems a more likelihood, statistically....
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  • bobr
    replied to Help!
    being L3 and from Brazil, the likely answer is that your maternal line ancestor was an African woman who was absorbed into the Amerindian and European Population in Brazil sometime after Portuguese Colonization....
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  • bobr
    replied to Could there be a mistake?
    It's not all that inconceivable that you belong to the E3a African Haplogroup. There were free men of african ancestry that married into mostly white or native american communities. For example, a Black Male could have married a Woman who was 'Bi-racial' (Black and white), and their offspring could...
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  • It means that they need to do an SNP test to verify your Y-DNA Haplogroup. They initially do an STR test that PREDICTS your haplogroup based on the STR. So, most people get results that are a 'probability' based on STR and are not confirmed by SNP (a different test). This is a blessing in disguise,...
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  • bobr
    replied to What Surname
    The point of the convo was the use of surnames passed down by the mother. I was pointing out how convenient it was to have the custom of having the mother's surname for genealogy purposes. I'm not sure what point you are making regarding a higher power and a validation??....However, having both the...
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    Last edited by bobr; 28 February 2006, 12:37 AM.

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  • bobr
    replied to What Surname
    There is no need to put every single surname of all your relatives going back in antiquity, that's ridiculous. The Spanish way of doing it (the Paternal surname followed by the mothers) is sufficient. You can then trace both of the fathers and mother's lines by looking at the Baptismal Records, then...
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    Last edited by bobr; 27 February 2006, 06:13 PM.

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  • bobr
    replied to Eve's Daughters
    The author does try to name the haplogroups according to the ethnicity of where the haplogroup is most common or where it is thought to have originated. He gives African names to the African haplogroups, European names to the European haplogroups and Asian names to the Asian Haplogroups. He even separates...
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    Last edited by bobr; 24 February 2006, 12:41 PM.

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