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Welcome to the Still Family Y-DNA Project

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  • Welcome to the Still Family Y-DNA Project

    Our branch of the Still family has documented ancestry from Still surname English emigrants to America in the mid 1800's. We have further documented these Still emigrants back an additional two generations to common Still family ancestry from Yorkshire, England in the late 1700's. Our current DNA and historical research have also verified additional paternal Still surname ancestral lines in England as early as the 15th century. Recent demographic information from the UK Royal Mail surname archives show the Still family surname in 1881 was most frequent in the area surrounding Aberdeen, Scotland, and London. Our Still family genealogical research continues in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada, Australia, the United States, and here within the Still Family Y-DNA project.
    We have confirmed SNP's from these haplogroups that have been historically documented and correlated with current Still Project ancestral surnames from the UK:
    R1b1a2a1a1a
    R1b1a2a1a1a4
    R1b1a2a1a1b
    R1b1a2a1a1b3c
    If your initial FTDNA y-dna testing reveals your genetic membership in the broad haplogroup R1b1a2 and if you have any ancestors with the surname Still, on either your paternal, or maternal lineages, we urge you to join our open project. Many Thanks.

  • #2
    The "Still" surname family tree, from across the UK, has myriad branches. We have proven this. And as with almost all English surnames, sharing the same last name does not mean any genetic relationship. And of course, due to the destruction of many historical and parish records during the Revolution, we may only be able to verify ancestral records no earlier than the late 1500's. "Still" was a very common English surname historically, and most of our English, Scot and Irish "Still" surname paternal ancestors were tenant farmers, with their family members, until they emigrated to the US, Canada, or Australia - with little or no documented history either with them or left behind. Many of these emigrant tenant farmers could barely read or write. Many of them simply were given the surname 'Still' at birth by one of the Crown's officials or a priest at a religious event. But thanks to FTDNA and Y-DNA SNP's, we can at least now begin to start sorting out some of the different 'Still' Y-DNA ancestral branches that have found their haphazard ways around the globe.
    Last edited by Blakesley; 25th April 2014, 02:08 PM.

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    • #3
      Y-DNA Haplotree

      Thanks to FTDNA for creating the easy to navigate Y-DNA Haplotree. I would urge all Still Y-DNA project members to check out the additional SNP's that are now available at modest cost to refine your own R1b-U106 and R1b-L48 haplogroups.
      Remember that these current state-of-the-art SNP tests will not bring our Still paternal UK haplotree even close to a thousand years before the "historical records" era. Many of us are having a hard time finding ancestral documentation prior to the English Revolution, when parish records were destroyed. But it is still possible that land-owner and estate documents exist prior to the Revolution that will be someday found by the curious historian among us? Any UK historical ancestral link that we can find in our Still paternal ancestry will of course prove invaluable to everyone: by empirically pinning a particular SNP to a particular historical place at a particular historical time. Good Luck.
      Last edited by Blakesley; 25th April 2014, 02:03 PM.

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      • #4
        There was also a "Stille" family from Sweden, based in Wilmington, Delaware. I have that source as a female connection in my tree (maternal side). But that would not have anything to do with Y-DNA in my case. My female descendant line (NOT direct maternal line) from them moved to Kentucky, then to Indiana.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by PDHOTLEN View Post
          There was also a "Stille" family from Sweden, based in Wilmington, Delaware. I have that source as a female connection in my tree (maternal side). But that would not have anything to do with Y-DNA in my case. My female descendant line (NOT direct maternal line) from them moved to Kentucky, then to Indiana.
          By the way, my "Stille" line connects to the "Springer" line which goes back to Charlemagne and Clovis I.

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          • #6
            Still Family Y-DNA Project

            Many thanks to all ftdna.com members for your interest in the Still surname Y-DNA project. We are actually focusing this year on the UK Royal Mail historical databases and attempting to statistically correlate the large number of Still surnames with their current or historical locations in England, Wales, or Scotland. This is of extreme importance to our FTDNA group as some of these databases will be lost post-Brexit. We will also be examine the Eire mails as well, when we can obtain the archival databases.
            As we have mentioned before, there clearly is a significant demographic spike in the Still surname in the Aberdeen, Scotland, region.
            We are also examining current and historical telephone book surnames in these same regions. The telephone book statistical surveys have been proven to provide amazingly accurate genealogical information for the diffusion of surnames in the UK and other European countries.

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            • #7
              UK Royal Mail historical databases and attempting to statistically correlate the large number of Still surnames with their current or historical locations in England, Wales, or Scotland. This is of extreme importance to our FTDNA group as some of these databases will be lost post-Brexit.

              Why do you think that ?

              betadams

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Blakesley View Post
                As we have mentioned before, there clearly is a significant demographic spike in the Still surname in the Aberdeen, Scotland, region.
                We are also examining current and historical telephone book surnames in these same regions. The telephone book statistical surveys have been proven to provide amazingly accurate genealogical information for the diffusion of surnames in the UK and other European countries.
                Hi my mother's maiden name was Still, and I have traced her tree to John Still born circa 1770 in the Aberdeen area. I have only done my autosomal DNA test as I haven't traced any male Still males for Y DNA testing yet. But if any Still male members with Aberdeen lineage get tested please get in touch and we'll see if we can find a link the old fashioned paper way.

                Cheers

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                • #9
                  John Still was a common Aberdeen/Yorkshire name in the 1700's. My suggestion is to see if you can find an Aberdeen church/parish birth certificate for your Still ancestor in Aberdeen. I have a John Still paternal ancestor documented from a Hull parish in Yorkshire from 1750. You may also find extant marriage records from an Aberdeen church/parish for your Still ancestor. There are many professional genealogists working in Scotland who could help you out. Good luck!! Keep us posted.

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                  • #10
                    Welcome to our newest R1b haplogroup members in the Still surname YDNA project. It has been a while since the latest update from the Group Administrator (me). Please everyone in our Still surname group - please please update your current emails and phone numbers and addresses so other group members can communicate with you.
                    We have new members from Australia, and hopefully they will connect with others in our group who also live in Australia and share Still surname YDNA haplogroups originating from the UK.
                    I think trying to research emigration from the UK to Australia in the 1850's and earlier, without a paper trail, is among the hardest of any genealogical challenges!
                    Good luck to all.

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