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A DF41+ Stevens/Stephens Group

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    Stevo
    R1b-FGC36981

  • Stevo
    replied
    Originally posted by Stevo View Post
    We managed it. The upgrade to 111 markers has been ordered.
    All but one panel of his 111-marker upgrade has come in, and he has picked up only one more unit of genetic distance from me. If that holds up, and it should, we'll be a 107/111 match, which is not bad. That will make kit 326490 one of two 107/111 matches I have, and those are my two closest 111-marker matches, one with the surname Stevens, spelled as my surname is spelled, and one with the surname Stephens.

    Kit 326490's closest match at 67 was my Stephens match, 65/67, but he has picked up two more units of genetic distance on him, so, if everything stays the same, we three will all be four off each other at 111 markers and will be each other's closest matches.

    Kit 326490 lacks Panel 5, markers 76-85, for his upgrade to be complete. Hope those come in soon!

    Leave a comment:

  • Stevo
    R1b-FGC36981

  • Stevo
    replied
    Originally posted by Stevo View Post
    We managed it. The upgrade to 111 markers has been ordered.
    Still waiting on the upgrade. Waiting is the toughest part of this sport.

    Leave a comment:

  • Stevo
    R1b-FGC36981

  • Stevo
    replied
    Originally posted by Stevo View Post
    . . .

    Now we're trying to pool resources to organize an upgrade to 111 markers. . .
    We managed it. The upgrade to 111 markers has been ordered.

    Leave a comment:

  • Stevo
    R1b-FGC36981

  • Stevo
    replied
    Originally posted by Stevo View Post
    I picked up a new exact 12-marker match today, which would be no big deal except for the fact that this one has my surname: Stevens, kit 326490. His listed mdka is Obadiah Stevens, who was born about 1787 in England, but he doesn't say exactly where in England. The gentleman has 37 markers on order, due 14 March, so we should know soon whether or not the match holds up, at least at 37. I emailed him and suggested he order a DF41 test. Hopefully, he will.
    The upgrade for my 36/37 match above just went to 64/67. Our differences come on three fast-mutating markers, as follows:

    CDY, where he has 38-39 and I have 38-38.
    413, where he has 21-21 and I have 21-23.
    557, where he has 16 and I have 17.

    The mismatch at 413 may look like it should be two, but it is really only counted as one since it is apparently a RecLoH (Recombinant Loss of Heterozygosity).

    Now we're trying to pool resources to organize an upgrade to 111 markers.

    I've been doing some digging into Fayette County, Pennsylvania, where my new match's mdka was born in 1787. I don't have anything firm yet, but a possible "person of interest" is Evan Stephens (or Evan ap Stephen), who was born in Cardiff, Wales, in 1692 and immigrated to North America in 1715. He lived and died in Bucks County, PA, but some of his sons went to Fayette County.

    Like I said, nothing firm yet, but investigative leads are being developed.

    Leave a comment:

  • 1798
    Registered User

  • 1798
    replied
    DF41 does look as if it originated in the Isles.

    Leave a comment:

  • Stevo
    R1b-FGC36981

  • Stevo
    replied
    Anyway, my recent 36/37 match has ordered an upgrade to 67 markers. I hope the match holds up.

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  • Stevo
    R1b-FGC36981

  • Stevo
    replied
    I don't put much faith in that Norman story. For one thing, Stevens/Stephens is a common patronymic derived from the name of a very popular Christian saint (St. Stephen - see the Book of Acts in the New Testament). The close matches I have who can trace their ancestry across the Pond are Welsh. In Wales the name was originally ap Stevyn (spelling varied), meaning son of Steven. It was later anglicized as Stevens or Stephens.

    There are many similar Welsh surnames, like Edwards, Williams, Roberts, etc.

    Leave a comment:

  • 1798
    Registered User

  • 1798
    replied
    Originally posted by Stevo View Post
    I would prefer it if you two picked another thread to spread your particular brand of sunshine on. You're way off topic, for one thing.
    Yes you are right, I was of topic.
    The houseofnames site says that the surname Stevens was brought to England by the Normans.So you have a name that is 1000 years old and a SNP that could be 4000 years or more.
    This map from semargle should be a help.
    http://www.semargl.me/en/dna/ydna/map-snp/1309/

    Leave a comment:

  • Stevo
    R1b-FGC36981

  • Stevo
    replied
    I would prefer it if you two picked another thread to spread your particular brand of sunshine on. You're way off topic, for one thing.

    Leave a comment:

  • Canyon Wolf
    FTDNA Customer

  • Canyon Wolf
    replied
    1798 says
    "The geographical projects are a waste of time"

    I don't believe this is true of all projects, but does seem to be true for a large number of them.

    I belong to a geographic project that is pretty large and the admins are very active with the genealogy aspect of things, with keeping members informed, and in educating the members. They make use of 3rd party tools to help us connect up to each other and send us reports of their findings. This one is working the way I anticipated.

    I am also acquainted (through genealogy conferences) with several gentlemen that have been involved with Y-dna for many years. I have no idea what company they are with or where their projects are hosted. I do know from conversations with them that as admins for their surname projects they are very knowledgeable about the different lines and branches and every new member learns exactly where they fit in the big tree. This is what I anticipated when I joined the Stevens surname group here at FTDNA. Oh well, live and learn.

    Projects can work, it just doesn't seem to happen in the projects I have joined (with the one exception mentioned).

    Leave a comment:

  • 1798
    Registered User

  • 1798
    replied
    Originally posted by Canyon Wolf View Post
    I am not expecting anyone to do my work for me. But, all I am seeing are results tables sorted by haplogroup, which I don't find very helpful.

    I submitted a rather detailed genealogy for this line and expected something along the lines of a community Stevens skeleton tree of some sort showing which results can be mapped to which ancestor lines and which mutations are found in the different descendant lines. Always a work in progress, but something that would actually provide some information to project members.

    I really thought that was what joining a surname project was for. This is genetic genealogy after all, so where is the genealogy aspect of the project??? Why ask for genealogy if they are not making any use of it???

    Joining the project seems to have been a waste of time. IMHO

    Hope all the surname projects are not like this one.
    The geographical projects are a waste of time and most project admins are not there for the benefit of mankind but for themselves.

    Leave a comment:

  • Stevo
    R1b-FGC36981

  • Stevo
    replied
    Have you noticed how large the project is?

    Has is it occurred to you that the admins are volunteers with full-time jobs and families of their own?

    Perhaps the groupings could be re-organized to be more informative, but asking the admins of a large surname project to peruse individual genealogies and produce trees showing "which results can be mapped to which ancestor lines and which mutations" is asking a lot.

    Leave a comment:

  • Canyon Wolf
    FTDNA Customer

  • Canyon Wolf
    replied
    Not all the work, but what do they do?

    I am not expecting anyone to do my work for me. But, all I am seeing are results tables sorted by haplogroup, which I don't find very helpful.

    I submitted a rather detailed genealogy for this line and expected something along the lines of a community Stevens skeleton tree of some sort showing which results can be mapped to which ancestor lines and which mutations are found in the different descendant lines. Always a work in progress, but something that would actually provide some information to project members.

    I really thought that was what joining a surname project was for. This is genetic genealogy after all, so where is the genealogy aspect of the project??? Why ask for genealogy if they are not making any use of it???

    Joining the project seems to have been a waste of time. IMHO

    Hope all the surname projects are not like this one.

    Leave a comment:

  • Stevo
    R1b-FGC36981

  • Stevo
    replied
    I think there may be a lot New England Stevens/Stephens families.

    The Stephens/Stevens Y-DNA Project is fairly large and diverse, since Stephens/Stevens is a fairly common surname. It is currently organized by haplogroup, which does help one see how he fits into the bigger picture.

    I think most of us will have to figure things out for ourselves, with some help from project admins, since it is really not possible for the project admins of large projects to do the work for us.

    Leave a comment:

  • Canyon Wolf
    FTDNA Customer

  • Canyon Wolf
    replied
    Your New England Cousins

    Stevo,
    I like how you are making use of the forum in these threads.

    Is there anyone you know of working on the New England Stevens branch of the tree using dna?

    I joined my kits to the FTDNA Stevens Project (I administer my 3 "Stevens" uncle's kits), but have not really learned anything about how we fit into the bigger picture. I thought that was what the project administrators would be doing.

    I am an experienced genealogist and researcher, but new to genetic genealogy. I guess I should follow your lead and try to figure it out for myself.

    Leave a comment:

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