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Single Grave Corded Ware R1b-L51?

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  • Stevo
    replied
    Still waiting for the promised Single Grave Corded Ware paper. It's been a long wait thus far.

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  • Stevo
    replied
    I am grateful for the recent Papac et al paper, but we're still waiting for the paper on Single Grave Corded Ware that is supposed to be on its way.

    Word has it there's a lot of R1b-L51 in it. I got a sneak preview of one of the results some time back, and it was R1b-L51.

    Single Grave Corded Ware.jpg
    Last edited by Stevo; 3 October 2021, 10:18 AM.

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  • Stevo
    replied
    Originally posted by Stevo View Post
    Has anyone put together a nice, clear, simple spreadsheet on the R1b-L151 CW samples from this paper?
    Okay. I got the list of R1b guys from the Papac paper from Richard Rocca and added them to my R1b Corded Ware Google spreadsheet.

    https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...it?usp=sharing

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  • Stevo
    replied
    Has anyone put together a nice, clear, simple spreadsheet on the R1b-L151 CW samples from this paper?
    Last edited by Stevo; 7 September 2021, 06:59 PM.

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  • Stevo
    replied
    Thanks, Rich.

    I've been out of it because my wife is in ICU on a ventilator right now. Things were looking really bad, but, thanks be to God, she's making progress.

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  • R. Rocca
    replied
    Western Europe circa 2800 BC...

    L151_Expansion_2800_BC.png

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  • R. Rocca
    replied
    Originally posted by Stevo View Post
    Regarding the regional Corded Ware variants listed above, we have the following R1b results, not including the rumor of an upcoming paper featuring a lot of R1b-L51 in Single Grave.

    Single Grave Culture -
    1. Gjerrild5, R1b-V1636, Gjerrild, Denmark, 2343-2055 BC (Egfjord 2021)
    Corded Ware of the Alpine Pile Dwellings -
    1. MX304, R1b-L52, Auvernier, Switzerland, 2866-2601 BC (Furtwängler 2020)
    2. Aesch25, R1b-L151, Aesch, Switzerland, 2864-2501 BC (Furtwängler 2020)
    3. MX310, R1b-M269, Burgäschisee, Switzerland, 2862-2581 BC (Furtwängler 2020)
    Central German Corded Ware -
    1. ALT_4, R1b-L52, Althausen, Germany, 2570-2458 BC (Mittnik 2019)
    Małopolska Corded Ware -
    1. pcw361, R1b-L52, Łubcze, Poland, 2459-2351 BC (Linderholm 2020)
    2. pcw362, R1b-L52, Łubcze, Poland, 2459-2351 BC (Linderholm 2020)
    3. pcw350, R1b-M269, Łubcze, Poland, 2458-2353 BC (Linderholm 2020)
    4. pcw040, R1b-L52, Święte, Jarosław, Poland, 2479-2349 BC (Linderholm 2020)
    5. pcw041, R1b-M269 (probably L52, since he is likely the father of pcw040 above), Święte, Jarosław, Poland, 2479-2349 BC (Linderholm 2020)
    6. pcw070, R1b-L51, Święte, Jarosław, Poland, 2461-2351 BC (Linderholm 2020)
    7. pcw110, R1b-L23, Szczytna, Jarosław, Poland, (no date) (Linderholm 2020)
    8. pcw160, R1b-M269, Mirocin, Poland, 2459-2352 BC (Linderholm 2020)
    Battle-Axe Culture -
    1. RISE98, R1b-U106, Lilla Beddinge, Sweden, 2275-2032 BC (Allentoft 2015)
    Unknown Regional Variant -
    1. RISE1, R1b-M343, Obłaczkowo, Poland, 2865-2578 BC (Allentoft 2015)
    Hope I didn't leave any out.
    Aside from being very low coverage, the following was said about RISE1 in the Scandinavian Battle Axe Culture paper:

    "poz44: An almost complete although fragmented skeleton of a child (feature E8-A*). AMS radiocarbon dated to 2870-2580 cal BCE (95.4%) (table 1, table S1, Supplementary Section Radiocarbon dating and stable isotope analyses). Two mandibular teeth (I2 and C) and the petrous portion of the temporal bone were sampled for DNA. *We note that RISE1 (48) is also described as the individual from Obłaczkowo feature E8-A. However, their genetic results differ from ours. They present this individual as a molecularly determined male that belongs to Ychromosomal haplogroup (hg) R1b and to mtDNA hg K1b1a1 (48) while our results show this individual to be female, carrying a mtDNA hg U3a’c profile"

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  • Stevo
    replied
    Originally posted by KATM View Post
    Stevo, sad to hear you've been ill with COVID. I hope you recover soon, and have no lingering effects.

    Interesting that this study is of Bohemian genomes. I have one ancestral line from Bohemia, for which (thus far) I have found no candidates for Y-DNA testing. I'd like to have such results to compare with the findings in this study, whenever it comes out. Guess I need to focus more on that line, and see if I can identify any possibilities in matches.
    Thanks. This stuff is hard to shake. My wife has suffered from it more than I have. I'm feeling a lot better, although I'm not completely over it.

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  • KATM
    replied
    Stevo, sad to hear you've been ill with COVID. I hope you recover soon, and have no lingering effects.

    Interesting that this study is of Bohemian genomes. I have one ancestral line from Bohemia, for which (thus far) I have found no candidates for Y-DNA testing. I'd like to have such results to compare with the findings in this study, whenever it comes out. Guess I need to focus more on that line, and see if I can identify any possibilities in matches.
    Last edited by KATM; 26 August 2021, 01:06 PM.

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  • Stevo
    replied
    Originally posted by R. Rocca View Post
    Hey Stevo, missed you bud. Something good may be coming our way soon...

    Bohemia:Dynamic changes in genomic and social structures in 3rd millennium BCE central Europe

    Future Data Location: https://www.ebi.ac.uk/ena/browser/view/PRJEB45006

    Europe’s prehistory oversaw dynamic and complex interactions of diverse societies, hitherto unexplored at detailed regional scales. Studying 271 human genomes dated ~4900-1600 BCE from the European heartland, Bohemia, we reveal unprecedented genetic changes and social processes. Major migrations preceded the arrival of “steppe” ancestry and at ~2800 BCE three genetically and culturally differentiated groups co-existed. Corded Ware appeared by 2900 BCE, were initially genetically diverse, did not derive all “steppe” ancestry from known Yamnaya, and assimilated females of diverse backgrounds. Both Corded Ware and Bell Beaker groups underwent dynamic changes, involving sharp reductions and complete replacements of Y-chromosomal diversity at ~2600 and ~2400 BCE, respectively, the latter accompanied by increased Neolithic-like ancestry. The Bronze Age saw new social organization emerge amid a ≥40% population turnover.
    THANKS! Super news!

    Unfortunately for me, I have been sick with COVID for the past week. Figures the news would come at such an inopportune time, but I'll take it whenever.

    We've been waiting for this news for years now. Glad I've lived to see it!

    Leave a comment:


  • R. Rocca
    replied
    Hey Stevo, missed you bud. Something good may be coming our way soon...

    Bohemia:Dynamic changes in genomic and social structures in 3rd millennium BCE central Europe

    Future Data Location: https://www.ebi.ac.uk/ena/browser/view/PRJEB45006

    Europe’s prehistory oversaw dynamic and complex interactions of diverse societies, hitherto unexplored at detailed regional scales. Studying 271 human genomes dated ~4900-1600 BCE from the European heartland, Bohemia, we reveal unprecedented genetic changes and social processes. Major migrations preceded the arrival of “steppe” ancestry and at ~2800 BCE three genetically and culturally differentiated groups co-existed. Corded Ware appeared by 2900 BCE, were initially genetically diverse, did not derive all “steppe” ancestry from known Yamnaya, and assimilated females of diverse backgrounds. Both Corded Ware and Bell Beaker groups underwent dynamic changes, involving sharp reductions and complete replacements of Y-chromosomal diversity at ~2600 and ~2400 BCE, respectively, the latter accompanied by increased Neolithic-like ancestry. The Bronze Age saw new social organization emerge amid a ≥40% population turnover.

    Leave a comment:


  • Stevo
    replied
    Still waiting for that promised Single Grave Corded Ware scientific paper. I don't like waiting.

    Leave a comment:


  • Stevo
    replied
    One of the problems with the Single Grave culture in Denmark and the Netherlands is that the soil is so acidic that it just eats up skeletons. A ghostly outline of the skeleton is left, but usually there's nothing for DNA testing.

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  • Stevo
    replied
    There's a new paper out from archaeologist Kristian Kristiansen on the Single Grave burials at Gjerrild in Denmark:


    Genomic Steppe ancestry in skeletons from the Neolithic Single Grave Culture in Denmark.

    I haven't finished reading it yet myself, but I like Kristiansen's work.

    Abstract

    The Gjerrild burial provides the largest and best-preserved assemblage of human skeletal material presently known from the Single Grave Culture (SGC) in Denmark. For generations it has been debated among archaeologists if the appearance of this archaeological complex represents a continuation of the previous Neolithic communities, or was facilitated by incoming migrants. We sampled and analysed five skeletons from the Gjerrild cist, buried over a period of c. 300 years, 2600/2500–2200 cal BCE. Despite poor DNA preservation, we managed to sequence the genome (>1X) of one individual and the partial genomes (0.007X and 0.02X) of another two individuals. Our genetic data document a female (Gjerrild 1) and two males (Gjerrild 5 + 8), harbouring typical Neolithic K2a and HV0 mtDNA haplogroups, but also a rare basal variant of the R1b1 Y-chromosomal haplogroup. Genome-wide analyses demonstrate that these people had a significant Yamnaya-derived (i.e. steppe) ancestry component and a close genetic resemblance to the Corded Ware (and related) groups that were present in large parts of Northern and Central Europe at the time. Assuming that the Gjerrild skeletons are genetically representative of the population of the SGC in broader terms, the transition from the local Neolithic Funnel Beaker Culture (TRB) to SGC is not characterized by demographic continuity. Rather, the emergence of SGC in Denmark was part of the Late Neolithic and Early Bronze Age population expansion that swept across the European continent in the 3rd millennium BCE, resulting in various degrees of genetic replacement and admixture processes with previous Neolithic populations.
    Last edited by Stevo; 27 May 2021, 08:00 AM.

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  • Stevo
    replied
    skeleton waiting for Single Grave Corded Ware paper.jpgI keep checking the Eurogenes Blog each day for news, because that's where it will appear.
    Last edited by Stevo; 25 May 2021, 03:13 PM.

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