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Single Grave Corded Ware R1b-L51?

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  • #16
    Corded Ware is believed to have been a horse breeding, horse riding, mobile pastoralist culture. Here is a pretty good video on the earliest horse warriors. Yamnaya is discussed beginning about 30 minutes into the video. Corded Ware had about 80% Yamnaya dna.

    Last edited by Stevo; 29 July 2020, 09:27 AM.

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    • #17
      Guys, if you have a predicted R-M269 result from FTDNA and have central or western European ancestry, you are probably R1b-L51, with your terminal SNP downstream of either P312 or U106, which are the two biggest divisions of L51>P310>L151. You should be interested in the topic of this thread, since you are no doubt the descendants of Corded Ware y-dna ancestors.

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      • #18
        The Neolithic farmers of central and western Europe were likely decimated by Yersinia pestis before the steppe pastoralists arrived in the third millennium BC, but there was a certain amount of violence involved in the population replacement, as well.

        Globular Amphora Culture_GAC_massacre site_Koszyce in southern Poland.jpg

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        • #19
          Anyone interested in discussing this topic? I am. It's a shame to let FTDNA's forum stand idle.

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          • #20
            We're still waiting for the long expected Single Grave Corded Ware paper.

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            • #21
              Thank you Stevo for this topic;

              Paternally, I may be a descendant of this culture (Corded ware and Battle Axe).
              However, also appreciate that this is all a work in progress with much uncertainty.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by AndrewRoss View Post
                Thank you Stevo for this topic;

                Paternally, I may be a descendant of this culture (Corded ware and Battle Axe).
                However, also appreciate that this is all a work in progress with much uncertainty.
                Thanks. This and other papers like it have been making the rounds of rumors and leaks for quite some time. Hope to see something soon!

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                • #23
                  Wikipedia has a nice article on the Corded Ware culture; 3,100 to 2,350 BC.
                  There are of course a number of related cultures which overlap in both time and location.
                  Some cultures were absorbed while others developed.

                  There is a separate article on a "local variant" the Single Grave culture 2,800 to 2,200 BC.
                  Termed "local" by Wikipedia it actually spans a huge area centered on modern day Denmark that includes Northern Germany.
                  Lots of migrations in & out of the area, but not entirely as a dynasty developed in that culture too.

                  My patrilineal ancestor R-Y2395 migrated to the area from the east around 2,900 BC.
                  This is roughly the onset of the Single Grave culture.
                  His descendants remained in the location thru ~2,100 BC; at least as my ancestor R-Z281.
                  This is roughly the end of the Single Grave culture.

                  R-Y2395 has 735 branches on the tree with 2,111 descendants in the SNP tracker.
                  R-Z284 (~2,700 BC) appears to be a significant descendant with 722 downstream branches and 2,086 descendants.
                  These can be placed into 2 major clads (R-S4458 and R-Z288) and 2 minor clads (R-YP556 and R-YP1370)

                  R-S4458 currently has 465 total branches and 1,370 descendants.
                  R-Z288 currently has 213 total branches and 604 descendants.

                  R-S4458 appears to splinter while R-Z288 descends to R-Z287 ~2,300 BC who in turn has 6 major branches (i.e. a dynasty).

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                  • #24
                    The recent Wang et al paper, The Genomic Formation of Human Populations in East Asia, featured sample I6222 from the steppe pastoralist Afanasievo culture, recovered from a site in Mongolia and dated 3316-2918 cal BC. Well, that sample is R1b-L52 (P310), which was recently confirmed by the FTDNA lab's own examination of that ancient sample's BAM file.

                    That is the oldest R1b-L52 thus far recovered.

                    The recent Linderholm et al paper, Corded Ware cultural complexity uncovered using genomic and isotopic analysis from south-eastern Poland, found a number of Corded Ware skeletons that were R1b-L51. Interestingly, there was an autosomal affinity between those samples and the samples from the Afanasievo site described in Wang et al.
                    Last edited by Stevo; 31 October 2020, 08:09 AM.

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                    • #25
                      Here's a map I made showing all the Corded Ware R1b I currently know about and the ballpark locations of the finds. Click on it to make it bigger.

                      Corded Ware map_Sjögren et al_with R1b-L51 find locations.jpg
                      Last edited by Stevo; 27 November 2020, 10:03 AM.

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                      • #26
                        The recent archaeological paper, "The Forgotten Child of the Wider Corded Ware Family: Russian Fatyanovo Culture in Context" (Nordqvist and Heyd, 2020), includes this map, which posits a transformation of Yamnaya into Corded Ware. Notice that the arrow brings the transformational Yamnayans around the east and north side of the Carpathians and not up the Danube valley and into the Carpathian Basin.

                        Corded Ware_Yamnaya transformation_migration map_Nordqvist and Heyd 2020.jpg

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                        • #27
                          I added a couple of touches to the map above, from the recent Nordqvist and Heyd archaeological paper, "The Forgotten Child of the Wider Corded Ware Family: Russian Fatyanovo Culture in Context", to emphasize some things about it that I think are really important. I put red boxes around the transformational information, and I supplied the names of some rivers to help show the route Yamnaya took on its way to transforming into Corded Ware. Looks like that route was north up the valleys of the Prut and Dniester rivers, which took Yamnaya around the east side of the Carpathian Mountains, after which they hung a left, west into central Europe around the north side of that same mountain chain.

                          Corded Ware_Yamnaya transformation_migration map_Nordqvist and Heyd 2020.jpg

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                          • #28
                            Yet another adaptation of the map above.

                            Corded Ware spins off Beaker_map_CWC-X zone focus.jpg

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                            • #29
                              Here's a new paper featuring R1b-V1636 in Single Grave Corded Ware in Gjerrild, Jutland, Denmark. V1636 is rare nowadays. It is parallel to P297 (it is L389+ but P297-).

                              https://journals.plos.org/plosone/ar...l.pone.0244872

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Stevo View Post
                                The recent Wang et al paper, The Genomic Formation of Human Populations in East Asia, featured sample I6222 from the steppe pastoralist Afanasievo culture, recovered from a site in Mongolia and dated 3316-2918 cal BC. Well, that sample is R1b-L52 (P310), which was recently confirmed by the FTDNA lab's own examination of that ancient sample's BAM file.

                                That is the oldest R1b-L52 thus far recovered.

                                The recent Linderholm et al paper, Corded Ware cultural complexity uncovered using genomic and isotopic analysis from south-eastern Poland, found a number of Corded Ware skeletons that were R1b-L51. Interestingly, there was an autosomal affinity between those samples and the samples from the Afanasievo site described in Wang et al.
                                All of those eight Corded Ware R1b guys from Małopolska in SE Poland were buried in catacomb graves, which are sometimes referred to as "niche" burials. Linderholm apparently believes they were the products of migration of Catacombnaya people from the north Pontic (Black Sea) area. Polish archaeologist and Corded Ware expert Piotr Włodarczak is evidently of the same opinion.

                                The following is from his a
                                bstract entitled, “Eastern impulse in cultural and demographic changing during the ending southeastern Polish Eneolithic”, from the Abstract Book of the 2019 “Yamnaya Interactions” conference, University of Helsinki, 25-26 April 2019.

                                Originally posted by Piotr Włodarczak
                                Comparing to other areas of central Europe, the funeral ritual of the Final Eneolithic communities in Małopolska (Lesser Poland) looks quite original. The reason for this is an exceptionally strong connection with the traditions recorded in the North-Western territory of the Black Sea region. This is justified by geographic conditions: the loess highlands of south-eastern Poland are a natural extension of the areas of Volhynia and Podolia. These areas were not only the main route of east-west migrations, but also a zone with desired raw material base (e.g. copper, flints, rock raw materials). In the IIIrd millennium BC, four stages of latitudinal relations stand out, resulting in changes in the funeral rite of the Małopolska communities: I – (ca. 3000-2900 BCE) Pre-Corded, related to the appearance of the oldest kurgan communities (horizon CWC-X), II – (ca. 2800-2600 BCE) associated with the oldest Corded Ware horizon (horizon CWC-A), III – (ca. 2600-2550 BCE) linked to the migration of Middle Dnieper groups and the appearance of features of Catacombnaya culture and IV – (ca. 2400/2300-2000 BCE) associated with the Bell Beakers ritual and the Mierzanowice (Early Bronze Age) communities.

                                The unique character in the Corded Ware circle has primarily the third of the specified stages. In the area of Małopolska appear niche graves, which present the features of Catacombnaya culture, and burials of men equipped with weapons as well as sets of instruments emphasizing craft specialization (first: flint working). Typical is the presence of numerous graves in which the main weapon element is archery equipment. The context for the emergence of such burials is the presence in some of the graves of ceramics characteristic of Middle Dnieper cultural complex. All these characteristics testify to the role of migration (ca. 2600-2500 BCE) from the eastern territories (forest and forest-steppe borderline) in the origin of the new ritual. Specialized analyzes (archeogenetics and stable strontium isotopes) seem to confirm this hypothesis.
                                Here is a map from another of Włodarczak's papers that shows the movement of Catacombnaya up the river valleys from the Black Sea toward SE Poland.

                                map_ Włodarczak_Traits of Early Bronze Age Cultures_ Dniester route.jpg
                                Last edited by Stevo; 27 February 2021, 10:11 AM.

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