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  • Who has most 12/12 matches?

    I currently have 516 12/12 matches with FTDNA, only one of whom is related to me in the last 500 years (my father ).

    I am curious to see how many other people have large numbers of 12/12 matches. Perhaps we can find an I1a Ghenghis Khan out there somewhere!

    John
    YSEARCH: JNTCB

  • #2
    I'm now up to 562 12/12 matches. There must be a very prolific ancestor out there somewhere!

    John

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    • #3
      Congrats! I have currently exactly 0 12/12 matches.....

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      • #4
        I can not compete with you Y-DNA 12/12 Extremists. However, I do have 1,027 HVR1 mt-DNA matches (it would seem that 1,027 of us do )

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        • #5
          Originally posted by fmoakes
          I can not compete with you Y-DNA 12/12 Extremists. However, I do have 1,027 HVR1 mt-DNA matches (it would seem that 1,027 of us do )
          I only have 2 HVR1 mtDNA matches, neither of which survive to HVR2. Our situations seem to be reversed!

          John

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Johnserrat
            I am curious to see how many other people have large numbers of 12/12 matches. Perhaps we can find an I1a Ghenghis Khan out there somewhere!

            John
            YSEARCH: JNTCB

            Maybe you're not looking for a Ghenghis Khan but for a Don Juan----or maybe just the guy with the best looking mammoth coat.

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            • #7
              I'm hoping not to have to go all the way back to pre-historic times to find a common ancestor; although a mammoth coat does hold some attraction for me. I would hope that a common known ancestor could be found within the last 2,000 years.

              Given the number of likely offspring it would likely be someone with enough family wealth and power to support so many descendants (at least that is what I keep telling myself! ). Just because I cannot find a single famous ancestor for any family line over the past 500 years does not mean that I am not descended from kings, does it?! I mean statistically, given enough generations, it is virtually impossible not to be descended from royalty. It's just a question of time....and given the delay in getting results from the "advance" test orders I have plenty of that.

              John

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              • #8
                Originally posted by fmoakes
                I can not compete with you Y-DNA 12/12 Extremists. However, I do have 1,027 HVR1 mt-DNA matches (it would seem that 1,027 of us do )
                I have two 12/12 Y-DNA matches, but no HVR1 matches at all. Is mtHaplogroup J1a really that rare, or is just no one with it opting to give out their information?

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                • #9
                  I have 198 12/12 matches, only one of whom I've found a genealogical link to. I think I must be garden variety I1a-Norse.

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                  • #10
                    further testing

                    Originally posted by Johnserrat
                    I'm now up to 562 12/12 matches. There must be a very prolific ancestor out there somewhere!

                    John
                    You need to get a 37 or more marker test. Then see how refined your matches are then.

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                    • #11
                      Unfortunately, the vast majority of those I match with only tested for 12 markers. As a result, even though I tested for 37, I must assume that FTDNA's analysis is correct at the 12 marker level. According to FTDNA, there is a 91.41% chance that my 12/12 matches are related to me within the last 24 generations. Assuming 30 years per generation, that would mean a common ancestor who was born after 1287 CE for many of my now 565 12/12 matches!

                      John

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                      • #12
                        Don Juan I1a founding father

                        OK Johnserrat, you appear to be from one of the older I1a founding fathers, maybe the first who probably lived down on the Iberian peninsula during the last ice age. A larger number of descendants show up from fathers living earlier.

                        I have 146 12/12 matches and have been FTDNA database since May 26, 2004. One would think that with time to accumulate more swabbers that one's matches would increase?

                        I do have quite a coincidental fact: My step-son, a HAMILTON papered to Lanarkshire 1763 matches me 34/37 markers and still is the closest genetic match I have excluding my JULIAN seven 7th cousins. We JULIANs all have 43/43 matches. Not much mutation in this lineage!

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                        • #13
                          Gary,

                          Perhaps I1a does mutate somewhat more slowly than other haplogroups. On YSEARCH, I have 12/12 matches with just over 16% of all those who tested I1a. Any common ancestor for any of these individuals (other than my father) would have had to have lived before 1660 because I can trace my paternal heritage back to that date.

                          With respect to the Hamiltons, I have a number of 12/12 matches with Hamiltons and a 22/25 match with one in particular. We may all have the same great-grandfather 60-70 generations back during Roman times!

                          John
                          (566 12/12 matches and counting)

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Johnserrat
                            Perhaps I1a does mutate somewhat more slowly than other haplogroups.
                            I've had this thought also, but; is that even possible? For one haplogroup as a whole to have individual features that do not mutate as quickly as others? The particular chemicals & molecules are the same as any other haplogroup.

                            Maybe I1a has an ancient lost-to-history patriarch; ala the 'Gengis Kahn' effect.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Nagelfar
                              I've had this thought also, but; is that even possible? For one haplogroup as a whole to have individual features that do not mutate as quickly as others? The particular chemicals & molecules are the same as any other haplogroup.

                              Maybe I1a has an ancient lost-to-history patriarch; ala the 'Gengis Kahn' effect.
                              There must be different rates of mutation because otherwise an ancient haplogroup like A from Africa would no longer be around.

                              I would love to find a patriarch for I1a. Unfortunately, it is even unlikely that I will find a common patriarch for my 12/12 matches in the 24 generation timeframe suggested by FTDNA. My family are from The Netherlands. Many of my matches are from the UK and Ireland and we are unlikely to have a common ancestor after the norman conquest and likely do not have a common ancestor within the past 1,500 years according to Nordtvedt who has assigned us I1aAS*.

                              Still, much of the expansion of germanic tribes took place during recorded history and, as such, we may eventually be able to find a likely candidate for I1a AS* patriarch.

                              John

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