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FTDNA Chromosome Painter preview

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  • #16
    I fortunately had little faith at the time that it would stay up for long so I downloaded my raw data from it & can now refer to this beta version in a spreadsheet until the GUI version comes back - officially. It will be a very useful tool to see which dna is shared with others even if some segments are a little misinterpreted . The East Europe clusters between East & West Slavic & Baltic look to be clusters which may see some adjustment in coming versions.

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    • #17
      To be honest I'm surprised they even decided to introduce chromosome painting at this stage. Some of the most fundamental things that this site still lacks are the ability to verify triangulated segments when several people match you in the same chromosome location. I don't see the use of painting segments when you can't do that. Also, what good is "in common with" matches when you can't check how closely or distantly some of those are related to each other. I like the way MyHeritage DNA lists both your own and your genetic cousin's total shared cM with each common match. FTDNA are miles behind.
      Last edited by StefG; 10 August 2021, 09:19 AM.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by ledvenport View Post

        Thanks, KATM -- I missed that info from Gwallo. I wish that FTDNA were a little speedier. I first tested with them in about 2002 (the now somewhat super-basic seeming "DNA Print" test), and although they are a great company, they are not the speediest. I also don't understand why they would make the beta-type chromosome painter available briefly for some FTDNA members to try, and others, like me, to happen upon too late to try it.
        I'm not sure where the original poster, Septem27, got the link; perhaps a beta tester shared it, and it wasn't supposed to be shared with the public. I didn't see anything from FTDNA announcing it. Although trying the beta version was interesting, the example posted by Septem27 depicts most of what was available to see. My reply post described the rest.

        But the question still remains as to why there's been a delay. You (ledvenport) have almost a decade of experience longer than I do with the ways of FTDNA, but I hope that the new owner may improve response time. It is frustrating when we know a feature is coming, but the wait seems never-ending. I had hopes the new owner would be more communicative about these types of things, and in some cases that has been true (they've invited both customers and project admins to participate in surveys, and have sent emails alerting customers to new features).

        Bottom line: 23andMe is the only company that currently has a Chromosome Painting feature, found as a link in the customer's Ancestry Composition Overview section as "DNA Painting." In order for FTDNA's Chromosome Painter to be on par with the 23andMe Chromosome Painting features, FTDNA will need to include the following:
        • Further breakdown of Super Populations into Population Clusters with their own colors
        • Ability to view each individual Population Cluster by segment group, by hovering over the Population Cluster name or otherwise
        • Ability to choose a Confidence Level (conservative to speculative)
        • Inclusion of the X chromosome in the Chromosome Painter display, and the data in the downloaded .csv file
        • The ability to view segments contributed individually by each parent, labeled as such (this would require one or both parents to have been tested, and linked to the child). They determine the non-tested parent's data by "subtracting" the tested parent's data from the child's total data. 23andMe has this feature now, but it is separate from the Chromosome Painting. It is accessed via a link in their Ancestry Composition Overview, and displays the paternal and maternal inheritance data in two columns, even if only one parent had tested at 23andMe. It is not as interactive as it was a few years ago, though (pre- "New Experience"), when it was actually part of the Chromosome Painting tool as a drop menu choice as "Split View" vs. "Chromosome View."
        FTDNA's beta Chromosome Painter, as I experienced it using the link from Septem27, already has the following features that 23andMe does not have currently:
        • Ability to choose between Continent or Super Population to view the chromosomes (although 23andMe used to give the equivalent of those in FTDNA's beta, they also had the additional choice of Sub-Regional, equivalent to myOrigins 3.0 Population Clusters, which the FTDNA beta Chromosome Painter did not offer; 23andMe simply provides this Sub-Regional/Population Cluster-type level now, with no other options)
        • Ability to view chromosomes in vertical or horizontal layout
        • Includes the segment size in cM in the downloaded .csv file

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        • #19
          Originally posted by StefG View Post
          Also, what good is "in common with" matches when you can't check how closely or distantly some of those are related to each other. I like the way MyHeritage DNA lists both your own and your genetic cousin's total shared cM with each common match. FTDNA are miles behind.
          Even 23andMe shows information about both sides of the common matches. I wish FTDNA and Ancestry would include this very basic information.

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          • #20
            I agree wtih StefG and Jim Barrett on this point. Whatever the possible benefits of "chromosome painting", even if it could be packaged in a way that allows us to assess its accuracy and reliability, they are way, way down the list from what we gain from true triangulation. The other vendors that have provided basic triangulation information (for me, MyHeritage has the most convenient and useful version right now) do not seem to have experienced any major setbacks as a result of imagined privacy concerns. There does not seem to be any downside from providing the basic information about total shared cM and segment overlap with third parties for a shared match. The sky did not fall, customers are happy.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by KATM View Post

              I'm not sure where the original poster, Septem27, got the link; perhaps a beta tester shared it, and it wasn't supposed to be shared with the public. I didn't see anything from FTDNA announcing it. Although trying the beta version was interesting, the example posted by Septem27 depicts most of what was available to see. My reply post described the rest.

              But the question still remains as to why there's been a delay. You (ledvenport) have almost a decade of experience longer than I do with the ways of FTDNA, but I hope that the new owner may improve response time. It is frustrating when we know a feature is coming, but the wait seems never-ending. I had hopes the new owner would be more communicative about these types of things, and in some cases that has been true (they've invited both customers and project admins to participate in surveys, and have sent emails alerting customers to new features).

              Bottom line: 23andMe is the only company that currently has a Chromosome Painting feature, found as a link in the customer's Ancestry Composition Overview section as "DNA Painting." In order for FTDNA's Chromosome Painter to be on par with the 23andMe Chromosome Painting features, FTDNA will need to include the following:
              • Further breakdown of Super Populations into Population Clusters with their own colors
              • Ability to view each individual Population Cluster by segment group, by hovering over the Population Cluster name or otherwise
              • Ability to choose a Confidence Level (conservative to speculative)
              • Inclusion of the X chromosome in the Chromosome Painter display, and the data in the downloaded .csv file
              • The ability to view segments contributed individually by each parent, labeled as such (this would require one or both parents to have been tested, and linked to the child). They determine the non-tested parent's data by "subtracting" the tested parent's data from the child's total data. 23andMe has this feature now, but it is separate from the Chromosome Painting. It is accessed via a link in their Ancestry Composition Overview, and displays the paternal and maternal inheritance data in two columns, even if only one parent had tested at 23andMe. It is not as interactive as it was a few years ago, though (pre- "New Experience"), when it was actually part of the Chromosome Painting tool as a drop menu choice as "Split View" vs. "Chromosome View."
              FTDNA's beta Chromosome Painter, as I experienced it using the link from Septem27, already has the following features that 23andMe does not have currently:
              • Ability to choose between Continent or Super Population to view the chromosomes (although 23andMe used to give the equivalent of those in FTDNA's beta, they also had the additional choice of Sub-Regional, equivalent to myOrigins 3.0 Population Clusters, which the FTDNA beta Chromosome Painter did not offer; 23andMe simply provides this Sub-Regional/Population Cluster-type level now, with no other options)
              • Ability to view chromosomes in vertical or horizontal layout
              • Includes the segment size in cM in the downloaded .csv file
              I hope FTDNA releases the chromosome painter soon, but, as much as I really like the company, they usually release new features long after (sometimes many months after) the time period that they originally announced the release. I use 23andMe's chromosome painting tool a great deal.

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              • #22
                I was so excited about this, then I found out that GedMatch admixture tools have a feature to show you chromosome paintings, I satisfied my curiosity with that for now.

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                • #23
                  Chromosome painting can be applied to cross-species comparisons as well as to the study of chromosomal rearrangements in animal models of human diseases.

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