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So am I Scots-Irish or not?

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  • So am I Scots-Irish or not?

    My known genealogy traces to a Scots-Irish source in 1740. Shared results on Ancestry and other sites seem to show a northern Irish connection, which is consistent with Scotland-to-Ireland migrations. Especially with a name like "Campbell" I think that's a valid assumption. However, my FTDNA shows only 8% British Isles and 67% central Europe, centering around Switzerland, east France, and southwest Germany. How is that?

    (I seriously doubt that the German origin is my mother's. She comes from a long line of Mexicans, which shows up as 19% New World.)

    Do FTDNA results go far enough back to show ancient Celtic origins (hence, central Europe)? Even if so, how can the British Isles show up as a meager 8%?
    Last edited by campbellum; 24th November 2017, 12:40 PM.

  • #2
    Originally posted by campbellum View Post
    My known genealogy traces to a Scots-Irish source in 1740. Shared results on Ancestry and other sites seem to show a northern Irish connection, which is consistent with Scotland-to-Ireland migrations. Especially with a name like "Campbell" I think that's a valid assumption. However, my FTDNA shows only 8% British Isles and 67% central Europe, centering around Switzerland, east France, and southwest Germany. How is that?

    (I seriously doubt that the German origin is my mother's. She comes from a long line of Mexicans, which shows up as 19% New World.)

    Do FTDNA results go far enough back to show ancient Celtic origins (hence, central Europe)? Even if so, how can the British Isles show up as a meager 8%?
    You seem to be making the assumption that the so-called Scots-Irish were Celtic. Maybe some were but that doesn't meant that they all were. Some could have been Germanic.

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    • #3
      Mexico has been heavily influenced by Europeans, some states more than others. I just had my 90 year old Uncle's DNA done (he has two Mexican parents) and he's 52% European and only 33% AmerIndian.

      Before the test results came in, I speculated and I didn't think the Europeans could get to (his Mother) my Grandmother in the high Sierra Madre mountains, but they surely did get to her there too. Otherwise, my Uncle's DNA would have at least been 50% native AmerIndian or even higher.

      Europeans. Europeans everywhere!

      My Mother says that some towns in Mexico that she went to, the whole town had blue eyes.

      I had to tell my family that there's no "Where's Waldo?" meaning that I won't find the German, French, Italian or Greek person in our family tree to make up for those percentages in our (my Uncle's) ethnicity estimate. We are all part of Waldo now.

      *I just checked one of our close matches who still lives in Mexico (they have a Mexican email address, and their tree is filled out on WikiTree with all Mexican ancestry.) On GEDMatch, they too are only 30% AmerIndian and more than half European.

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      • #4
        I honestly think way too much weight has been placed in ethnicity estimations and interpretations.

        Each company has different terminology, reference populations and the like. The Scots-Irish also known as Ulster-Scots have roots not exclusive to Scottish settlers in Ulster, but also with Northern English people and Anglo-Scottish Borderers. All areas that saw mixing between Celts and Germanics.
        Last edited by spruithean; 25th November 2017, 08:01 PM.

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        • #5
          Unfortunately, the current version of myOrigins is problematic for a lot of people. Have you uploaded your raw data to Gedmatch.com ? If not, you may want to do that, and then use the different calculators there to get other opinions for your ethnicity estimate.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by campbellum View Post
            My known genealogy traces to a Scots-Irish source in 1740. Shared results on Ancestry and other sites seem to show a northern Irish connection, which is consistent with Scotland-to-Ireland migrations. Especially with a name like "Campbell" I think that's a valid assumption. However, my FTDNA shows only 8% British Isles and 67% central Europe, centering around Switzerland, east France, and southwest Germany. How is that?
            Because the ethnicity report is only an estimate and I really wouldn't take it literally. While it's fairly accurate on a continental level, sub-continental groups have been intermixing for so long that neighboring regions will always share some DNA and therefore be difficult, if not impossible, to tell apart. Different companies will likely give you different results because they are using different sample groups and analyses.

            For example, take a look at the different results for myself and my family members across different companies:

            https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...sW3Et4/pubhtml

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