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whopping 41% BI, not a british ancestor in sight?

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  • whopping 41% BI, not a british ancestor in sight?

    hello dear people, i am new to the forum and totally new to dna geneology in general.

    my origins gives me a whopping 41% british isles ancestry and yet there isn't a single such ancestor on my family tree back to ca 1700 on both maternal and paternal sides.

    can someone please help me to understand?

  • #2
    Originally posted by Kohlehydrat View Post
    hello dear people, i am new to the forum and totally new to dna geneology in general.

    my origins gives me a whopping 41% british isles ancestry and yet there isn't a single such ancestor on my family tree back to ca 1700 on both maternal and paternal sides.

    can someone please help me to understand?
    What do you believe are the major components of your ethnicity?

    Have you uploaded your Family Finder data to GEDmatch to try some of the admixture calculators there?

    Comment


    • #3
      thank you for your reply!
      the known components back to 1680-1700 are austrian/german, czech, italian, armenian and a spot of polish.
      i have just received my first results ever here, i haven't proceeded to GEDmatch yet. i am trying to understand what constitutes as british isles. from my mother's side, all ancestors back to 1680 are germans who had settled in the banat. are germans and british isles a possible mixup?

      editing to add: these are my origin results
      European 95%
      British Isles 41%
      Southeast Europe 41%
      East Europe 13%
      --------------------
      Trace Results
      Ashkenazi < 2%
      East Central Africa < 1%
      Finland < 2%
      West Middle East < 1%
      Last edited by Kohlehydrat; 9th November 2017, 09:39 AM.

      Comment


      • #4
        I wasn't familiar with the banat. I had to do a little research. It sounds like a little melting pot with room for some other ethnicities to slip in.

        I think I would proceed with uploading your kit to GEDmatch.

        Did you get any close matches on Family Finder which you do not know the common ancestor for?

        Jack Wyatt

        Comment


        • #5
          Basically, these tests can't differentiate western European populations because the peoples of western Europe have been moving around and mixing for thousands of years. They are a little better at differentiating Southern Europeans from Western Europeans. There was less mixing because of the mountain barrier.

          The tests are good at differentiating populations who lived on different continents.

          FTDNA says my mother is 8% Western European when in reality, she's over 75%. They give her 56% British Isles, when she's less than 25%. The rest they say is Eastern Europe and she doesn't have any Eastern European at all. On this latest version of the test, they seem to have decided that everyone who was western European should be changed to eastern.

          Comment


          • #6
            I'd also suggest that you upload your raw data to My Heritage and DNAland as well. You can never have too much information.

            Comment


            • #7
              thank you, Frank, Jack and MoberlyDrake for your replies!

              i will certainly be uploading my data in other places. before i do that i would like to get a firmer grip on what it all means and what i am doing. for me this is fun and an adventure.

              i don't have any close matches on family finder, the closest was a 4th or so cousin who i would like to contact but i did also take note of someone whose ancestry i am sure, when we follow it up, is also going to lead into the banat.

              jack, yes, the banat might seem like a melting pot but among the settlers (at least in some areas) it was not. the so-called danube swabians, settlers from several different german regions who were sent to the devastated region to make it agriculturally viable, had a tenacious tendency to marry among themselves. all of the many, many branches of that part of my heritage are intricate and interwoven and a solid block of german settlers. of course, you never know, where the odd cuckoldry or otherwise unfortunate instance might have happened but officially those lines are all german.

              either way, nothing british, not even french.
              my mtDNA on the other hand (distance 2-3) shows lots of connections up in sweden in finland.

              Comment


              • #8
                Another factor is that DNA is passed on in a random way and you may by chance get more than is proportionate from one ancestor and none at all from another ancestor.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Have you contacted FTDNA about the result? I'd be interested in hearing their explanation. Also, I'd test at least one of your closest relatives; if possible, one from each side of your family.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I do not think there is any need to contact FTDNA.

                    Originally posted by MoberlyDrake View Post
                    Basically, these tests can't differentiate western European populations because the peoples of western Europe have been moving around and mixing for thousands of years. They are a little better at differentiating Southern Europeans from Western Europeans. There was less mixing because of the mountain barrier.

                    The tests are good at differentiating populations who lived on different continents.
                    [----]
                    Originally posted by MoberlyDrake View Post
                    Another factor is that DNA is passed on in a random way and you may by chance get more than is proportionate from one ancestor and none at all from another ancestor.

                    Yes, your German population could be seen as British.

                    Your Polish input could be from Scottish families that migrated to Poland, as it happens in the genealogical research, during the period just before your paper trail runs out. (Yes, that migration did happen.)

                    Although Austria and Bohemia are separated from Germany by mountains, there are established R1b-U106 Y-DNA lines there, while R1b-U106 is normally associated with the British Isles. Origin of those lines there is unknown as of yet.

                    Also the populations used by Family Finder predate the populations you know from your genealogy by hundreds of years.


                    Mr. W


                    P.S.
                    Eastern Europe in myOrigins is really Central Europe, and not Eastern part of Europe. Thus it covers Austrian, Czech and Polish ancestry. myOrigins Eastern Europe shows in results of many people of German ancestry...
                    Last edited by dna; 10th November 2017, 12:27 AM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      very interesting, thank you all for your input and information!
                      the bit about scots migrating to poland is also quite fascinating.
                      in my case there are only 3 close relatives left to test, 2 estranged on the one side and my father who is resisting.


                      edited to add: i hadn't realized how long and widespread scottish migration has actually been.
                      http://www.genealogical.com/products...1850/9815.html
                      http://www.scottishdiasporatapestry.org/germany
                      https://flemish.wp.st-andrews.ac.uk/...d-before-1700/
                      Last edited by Kohlehydrat; 10th November 2017, 09:41 AM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by MoberlyDrake View Post
                        Basically, these tests can't differentiate western European populations because the peoples of western Europe have been moving around and mixing for thousands of years. They are a little better at differentiating Southern Europeans from Western Europeans. There was less mixing because of the mountain barrier.

                        The tests are good at differentiating populations who lived on different continents.

                        FTDNA says my mother is 8% Western European when in reality, she's over 75%. They give her 56% British Isles, when she's less than 25%. The rest they say is Eastern Europe and she doesn't have any Eastern European at all. On this latest version of the test, they seem to have decided that everyone who was western European should be changed to eastern.


                        My mother & Uncle also received BI % & they are 50 % Jewish w/Balkan & Abruzzi, Spanish/Turkish & German Ancestry. I think the BI = German

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          FTDNA gives me 40% British Isles, and 29% Scandinavian. My dad was 3/4 Norwegian. So I would think my Scandi would be higher. But there is that recombination with Meiosis that does things with a mind of its own, ha ha.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Kohlehydrat View Post
                            very interesting, thank you all for your input and information!
                            the bit about scots migrating to poland is also quite fascinating.
                            in my case there are only 3 close relatives left to test, 2 estranged on the one side and my father who is resisting.


                            edited to add: i hadn't realized how long and widespread scottish migration has actually been.
                            http://www.genealogical.com/products...1850/9815.html
                            http://www.scottishdiasporatapestry.org/germany
                            https://flemish.wp.st-andrews.ac.uk/...d-before-1700/

                            Yeah, we were shocked to find the Barclay surname eventually turn up way back on one branch of my mom's Baltic German lines and then we saw that some other side branches somewhat more recently had a marriage with someone from Scotland. So just two cases right there all tied to just the going on of a single family in the Baltics. The former case we can't manage to trace back or connect anywhere yet, all we know is she was born around 1770, not even sure in what country so unfortunately we are not sure exactly what Barclay family they tie back to (or how to really even try to manage to figure it out). In the latter case we were surprised to get a hit to some trees from people in the U.S. and Scotland and have it traced back some from that (I bet they were even more shocked since most of their trees were 100% Scottish and were traced all over the place, some even guessed that the guy she married was Scottish, apparently they had a second marriage also back in Scotland as well as the one in Riga and some of them noticed that one, none seem to have had the remotest clue the guy was actually Baltic German and that they went back to Latvia and had kids there, heck FamilySearch hint suggestion was that he was Scottish and that they never had any kids! None of them had a clue she actually went off to Latvia.)


                            Then we read that apparently tens of thousands of Scottish went to Poland and the Baltics between 1600 and 1900.
                            Last edited by wombat; 17th November 2017, 11:33 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Also do keep in mind that MyOrigins 2.0 also seems a bit unstable. Also that Germany sort of splits into four main types, UK-type Germans, Scandinavian-type, Eastern Europeanish-type and more French-type. It's one of the trickiest regions to specifically pick out, so much mixing, practically every war went through there, so many migrations, etc.

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