Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Possible NON paternity?when?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Possible NON paternity?when?

    Hi, am from eastern europe Bulgaria. On my mothers line are coming from the territory of river Don. They are coussaks. On my fathers line i have one green grand grand father and one family line that originaleske from Montenegro. Somehow i get 9% british islands in mu DNA. And i find it too much to be ancient. And What does it mean acient? English people are not exactly konen to visit balkans. Except for the crusaders in 10-12th
    Century. I checked my percentage with geno 2.0 it says 11%. Even more. The results are consistent with DNA land and gedmatch. What does this mean? If there is NON paternity event with 11% DNA that is forreighn. When has it happened? Also i carry on my fathers line R1b-U106 haplogroup Which is not common for the theritory of Bulgaria. Does this mean this 9-11% are coming from my fathers line?

  • #2
    Originally posted by palex82 View Post
    Hi, am from eastern europe Bulgaria. On my mothers line are coming from the territory of river Don. They are coussaks. On my fathers line i have one green grand grand father and one family line that originaleske from Montenegro. Somehow i get 9% british islands in mu DNA. And i find it too much to be ancient. And What does it mean acient? English people are not exactly konen to visit balkans. Except for the crusaders in 10-12th
    Century. I checked my percentage with geno 2.0 it says 11%. Even more. The results are consistent with DNA land and gedmatch. What does this mean? If there is NON paternity event with 11% DNA that is forreighn. When has it happened? Also i carry on my fathers line R1b-U106 haplogroup Which is not common for the theritory of Bulgaria. Does this mean this 9-11% are coming from my fathers line?
    You're right. U106 is mainly a northern European haplogroup. It's not very common in southern Europe, including the Balkans and Italy. My U106 paternal line is from Sicily, so I know how uncommon it is there.

    If you've tested your yDNA at FTDNA and not yet joined the R1b-U106 Project - at https://www.familytreedna.com/groups/u106/about - please do so. There's a join button near the top right of the page, although it may not show up using Firefox. If so, use Chrome instead.

    We definitely need more members with eastern European, including Balkan, ancestry. One of the co-administrators is Romanian, but we need more members with uncommon ancestries.

    It's hard to say if your paternal line is where the British ancestry is. All the ethnicity estimators have trouble distinguishing German from British Isles. So, it may be that you have some German ancestry but its being misread. You would know Bulgaria's history better than me, but perhaps there has been some settlement by Germans in Bulgaria.

    Comment


    • #3
      About your U106

      Originally posted by MMaddi View Post
      [----] It's hard to say if your paternal line is where the British ancestry is. All the ethnicity estimators have trouble distinguishing German from British Isles. So, it may be that you have some German ancestry but its being misread. You would know Bulgaria's history better than me, but perhaps there has been some settlement by Germans in Bulgaria.
      A single man could have travelled far away, for example as a merchant, an artisan, a craftsman, a scientist, an envoy or being their servant.

      Another possibility is that of a soldier from Germany (centuries ago). You have to take into account that Janissaries ( Еничари ) of the Ottoman Empire were initially partially recruited from prisoners of war. And some Janissaries had children. There are very many other possibilities, another one is that German mercenaries took part in the Battle of Varna in 1444 ( в Битка при Варна на 10 ноември 1444 г. ). Has one of them escaped after or before the battle and settled in Bulgaria?


      Mr. W

      P.S.
      Yes, your 9-11% of British Islands ancestry could be related to your father line. However, you would probably know about that. More likely your father line alone did not give you that much of autosomal DNA.

      You can count yourself:
      • 50% of your autosomal DNA came from your father
      • 25% of your autosomal DNA came from your father's father (paternal grandfather)
      • 12.5% of your autosomal DNA came from the father of your paternal grandfather (paternal great-grandfather)

      So the father of your paternal grandfather would need to be British or German...

      Here is a picture showing those percentages for a maternal line (but it works the same way)



      The above percentages are only approximations. An explanation can be found in
      https://isogg.org/wiki/Autosomal_DNA_statistics
      (the above picture comes from there).

      Comment


      • #4
        Many Saxons settled in the Balkans, though I think they were more centrally located in Transylvania. Anyhow, Saxons in Germany & Saxon in England are basically the same genetically. Perhaps you could be descended from a Saxon settler to Southeast Europe?

        Comment

        Working...
        X