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Asia Minor DNA

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  • #16
    I'm new to all this but was surprised to find Iberia 13% and Asia Minor 6% in my origins results. I would have expected a larger percentage of British isles but it was only 23%. But given that I know extremely little about my paternal grandfathers background who knows. As a newbie I admit I was like who has Turkish ancestry in my family ??

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Carrielwb View Post
      As a newbie I admit I was like who has Turkish ancestry in my family ??
      Does it relate to modern-day Anatolian Turks?If i'm not wrong its reference population is Armenians.Except Azeris and Anatolian Turks Georgians,Armenians,Chechens (even Mountain Jews) get high percentage Asia Minor as well.
      Last edited by musayev; 5th August 2017, 10:32 AM.

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      • #18
        Greetings.
        I joined the forum looking for an answer for the very same questions that created this thread. My recent results included 14% middle eastern, with an 8% anatolian and a 4% north African. I am of hispanic ancestry and my Y-DNA is R1B (R-M269).
        My curiosity about the Anatolian part concerns a "window of time". Is my 8% from the hunter-gatherer period? Hittite? Lydian? Bithynian? Carian? Greek? Turkish? a combination of all?
        Reading the posts I see that the question remains unanswered.
        I am completely new to the genealogical DNA world and my knowledge is so far very limited.
        Ceasar
        Last edited by keisar; 19th August 2017, 12:17 AM.

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        • #19
          Before taking origins 2 seriously..

          Have a look at my results (11% Sephardic) and my father (Carl) and mother's results (Blanche) (no Jewish to speak of). My father is half Iranian and half european, my mother 100% Europe, mostly Italy and France.

          There is a technical issue here with the algorithms. Clearly my Sephardic results should be Asia Minor, as they WERE (17%) in origins 1. I would not want someone to waste too much time chasing down something that is not even there to begin with.
          Attached Files
          Last edited by JamesBianco; 24th August 2017, 10:52 AM.

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          • #20
            Im 34% asia minor.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by keisar View Post
              Greetings.
              I joined the forum looking for an answer for the very same questions that created this thread. My recent results included 14% middle eastern, with an 8% anatolian and a 4% north African. I am of hispanic ancestry and my Y-DNA is R1B (R-M269).
              My curiosity about the Anatolian part concerns a "window of time". Is my 8% from the hunter-gatherer period? Hittite? Lydian? Bithynian? Carian? Greek? Turkish? a combination of all?
              Reading the posts I see that the question remains unanswered.
              I am completely new to the genealogical DNA world and my knowledge is so far very limited.
              Ceasar
              I am also Hispanic with 12% Middle Eastern (Asia Minor). I have not taken a Y-DNA test, but I have a first cousin (once removed) who has, and he is J-M267.

              His "father's, father's, father's.... line" goes back to my maternal 7th great grandfather, so I'm assuming the Middle Eastern in us comes, in part, from that ancestor. But I have no Sephardic in my results, and I don't think my cousin has any either (although we have a lot of Spanish surnames in our genealogies that were supposedly associated Jewish/Converso colonists that came to the New World fleeing the Spanish Inquisition.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Tomero View Post
                I am also Hispanic with 12% Middle Eastern (Asia Minor). [...] But I have no Sephardic in my results, and I don't think my cousin has any either (although we have a lot of Spanish surnames in our genealogies that were supposedly associated Jewish/Converso colonists that came to the New World fleeing the Spanish Inquisition.
                You may still have a small amount of Sephardic DNA, even though you don't score any in this company's Sephardi or Ashkenazi reference populations. The lower reaches of your Family Finder match list could provide clues.

                Jewish DNA segments have been found in some Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, Dominicans, Panamanians, Costa Ricans, Colombians, Ecuadorians, and elsewhere in the Spanish Americas. What kind of Hispanic are you?

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by khazaria View Post
                  You may still have a small amount of Sephardic DNA, even though you don't score any in this company's Sephardi or Ashkenazi reference populations. The lower reaches of your Family Finder match list could provide clues.

                  Jewish DNA segments have been found in some Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, Dominicans, Panamanians, Costa Ricans, Colombians, Ecuadorians, and elsewhere in the Spanish Americas. What kind of Hispanic are you?
                  I'm a New Mexico Hispano. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hispanos_of_New_Mexico
                  The leader of the expedition into New Mexico (1598) was Juan de Onate, and his mother was from a Jewish family in Spain. There were single soldiers that came with him, but there were also some families with him that came from Spain, as well as from Mexico, and it is speculated that some of these soldiers and especially the families were Conversos/Sephardic Jews.

                  The New Mexico colony was relatively isolated from the rest of New Spain, so the soldiers married and inter-married into the families that came with Onate, or married Native Pueblo women. As a result, most New Mexico Hispanos that can trace their ancestry to 1598 have common ancestors.

                  My 7th great grandfather that I mentioned in my original post did not come in 1598. His son came to New Mexico from Mexico City in 1693, during the reconquest of New Mexico, after the Pueblo People revolted in 1680 and drove out the Spanish.
                  Last edited by Tomero; 2nd September 2017, 02:03 AM.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Tomero View Post
                    I'm a New Mexico Hispano. [...] The leader of the expedition into New Mexico (1598) was Juan de Onate, and his mother was from a Jewish family in Spain. There were single soldiers that came with him, but there were also some families with him that came from Spain, as well as from Mexico, and it is speculated that some of these soldiers and especially the families were Conversos/Sephardic Jews.
                    I've found Jewish DNA segments in some Hispanos from New Mexico and Colorado. This has turned it from speculation to fact.

                    Originally posted by Tomero View Post
                    The New Mexico colony was relatively isolated from the rest of New Spain, so the soldiers married and inter-married into the families that came with Onate, or married Native Pueblo women. As a result, most New Mexico Hispanos that can trace their ancestry to 1598 have common ancestors.
                    Indeed, I've seen Hispanos form a matching cluster of their own, with less connections to northeastern Mexico and south Texas Hispanics than I had been expecting. They became two distinct endogamous clusters, to a large extent.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by MMaddi View Post
                      However, it is the case that FTDNA has explained in public presentations that they've designed myOrigins to pick up ancient ancestry, on the order of 1,000 to several thousand years ago. 23andMe, on the other hand, designed their Ancestry Composition feature to hone in on the last 500 years of ancestry. That's one reason why 23andMe's admixture estimates more accurately reflect the paper trail ancestry of their customers.

                      Given that those with Italian ancestry are consistently given significantly higher percentages of Asia Minor than those with northern European ancestry, this probably reflects the strong genetic influence in Italy from the Neolithic to as recently as 1,000 years ago from Middle Eastern populations, including from Asia Minor. So, it's certainly plausible that the percentages of Asia Minor given my myOrigins does reflect someone's ancestry, but very deep ancestry. Still, it is a problem that it's misleading to people who take it at face value and begin looking for mystery Middle Eastern ancestry in their tree.
                      I'm just revisiting this thread, and the fact that FTDNA has designed myOrigins for ancient ancestry does not make sense to me. Many people do commercial genealogical DNA tests to find relatives, with hopes of breaking down brick walls and finding out more about their ancestors. With autosomal testing, I've seen estimates that it can be used to show familial connections back 250-500 years. What could be the reasoning for designing the ethnicity estimates in myOrigins to pick up 1,000 year old ancestry? Few people can find records to match that timeframe.

                      It's apparent that most people want, and expect, to see estimates which reflect their ethnicities for a genealogical timeframe. FTDNA already has "ancientOrigins" for the 1,000+ year timeframe, so of what use is a similar timeframe to genealogists who are trying to prove (or ascertain) their more recent ancestral ethnicities? Obviously showing 1,000 year ancestral origins in myOrigins has created a lot of discrepancies with testers' known ancestries. IMHO, FTDNA should seriously consider calculating future versions of myOrigins to more closely show the last 500 years, as 23andMe (and probably Ancestry.com) does. It would be beneficial to their bottom line.

                      Getting back to the topic of Asia Minor DNA, my maternal branch has its roots in Greece (Ionian Islands and Peloponnese), and Malta. So far, I have found records going back to the late 1700's, early 1800's for the Maltese branches, but records have not been so forthcoming for the Peloponnese as yet; I do know where they lived since the 1820's, though, and have leads to prior origins from the same region. In this maternal branch, the two eldest descendants still living, A and B, have tested (full siblings, whose parents are from those regions). These are their results:

                      myOrigins 1.0
                      European
                      - Southern Europe: A 63%; B 55%
                      Jewish Diaspora
                      - Ashkenazi : A 0%; B 8%
                      Middle Eastern
                      - Asia Minor: A 34%; B 33% .
                      - Eastern Middle East: A 0%; B 2%
                      - North Africa: A 3%; B 2%

                      myOrigins 2.0
                      European
                      - Western & Central Europe: A <2% (trace); B 11%
                      - Southeast Europe: A 80%; B 51%
                      Jewish Diaspora
                      - Ashkenazi: A <2% (trace); B 3%
                      - Sephardic: A 0%; B 17%
                      Middle Eastern
                      - Asia Minor: A <2% (trace); B 11.00%
                      - Eastern Middle East: A <2% (trace); B 0%
                      - North Africa: A <2% (trace); B 2%
                      - West Middle East: A 13%; B 4%
                      African
                      - West Africa: both <2% (trace)

                      ancientOrigins
                      Metal Age: A 17%; B 18%
                      Farmer: A 62%; B 62%
                      Hunter-Gatherer: A 19%; B 18%
                      Non-European: A 3%; B 2%

                      Neither have shown any matches that are identifiably Ashkenazi, Sephardic or otherwise Jewish, so I think those percentages may be misidentified. The North Africa amounts I believe can be attributed to traces in the Maltese branch. Both get matches of Maltese and Greek descent, some of which actually live in Greece.

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                      • #26
                        I used to have some Asia Minor in My Origins 1. With the update it vanished.
                        Now I got my parents tested, and they both have some of it (8% and 5%).

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Tomero View Post
                          I am also Hispanic with 12% Middle Eastern (Asia Minor). I have not taken a Y-DNA test, but I have a first cousin (once removed) who has, and he is J-M267.

                          His "father's, father's, father's.... line" goes back to my maternal 7th great grandfather, so I'm assuming the Middle Eastern in us comes, in part, from that ancestor. But I have no Sephardic in my results, and I don't think my cousin has any either (although we have a lot of Spanish surnames in our genealogies that were supposedly associated Jewish/Converso colonists that came to the New World fleeing the Spanish Inquisition.
                          I am also Hispanic with 15% Asia Minor. My ancestors are native American and people from Iberia. I know anybody of my ancestors who was from Anatolia.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Marcela Meza View Post
                            I am also Hispanic with 15% Asia Minor. My ancestors are native American and people from Iberia. I know anybody of my ancestors who was from Anatolia.
                            Interesting thread and confusing indeed. I got tested by both Ancestry and FTDNA

                            Ancestry

                            5% Middle East (Low Confidence) Estimate 0-10% range
                            4% Ashkenazi (Low Confidence) Estimate 0-8% range
                            <1% Caucasus (Low Confidence) Estimate 0-4% range

                            FTDNA

                            8% Middle East 4% Asia Minor, 4% East Middle East
                            2% West Middle East ( Trace Region )
                            0% Jewish Diaspora

                            The results were very similar from both testing companies. They might word it different and put specific areas in different categories, but you could make what's being said. In my case I see most of my Markers from that part of the world are in the Turkey, Caucasus/Iran region.

                            I have also uploaded my info to Gedmatch and on some tests my Asia Minor, Caucasus goes as high as 15%. When I think I'm getting somewhere something happens and I get more confused. All this is very entertaining, but I can't see cracking the Asia Minor, Caucasus connection. I too have strong Iberian and Native markers. Iberian is my strongest marker at 43%.

                            My Ancient European Origins has me 35% Non European and My Origins has me at 49% European. So, that 15%-16% that my origins didn't categorized me as European but Ancient Origins did is Asia Minor, Caucasus, Middle East, West Asian, I assume?

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