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  • Central South Asian

    My Father was Ukrainian, my Mother NW Europe. I have 3% Central South Asian and only 37% Eastern Europe which is odd. How old is the Central South Asian? Slavs came from that region but so did all Europeans so why do some of my matches show 100% European? I know eastern Europeans can have recent ancestry from Eurasia or Asia. I also have Ashkenazi Jewish matches in Eastern Europe.

  • #2
    Ancestry gives me 1%, or was it <1%, Indian region. I'm clueless as to where that came from; maybe Gypsies?

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    • #3
      My father & his brothers & their maternal first cousins all show about 3% South Asian. I suspect a Gypsy heritage. Maybe my g-g-g-g grandmother, Amelia (_____) (Easton) McCormick (1788-after 1850). Amelia's daughter, Rosanna McCormick was described in her obituary as "a noted fortune teller".

      They lived in Frederick Co., VA.

      Timothy Peterman

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      • #4
        All I can do about my own trace of Gypsy (assuming Gypsy, and not other Indian/So. Asian) is speculate. Gypsies were rounded up and sent as prisoners to tidewater Virginia by the British. But Gypsies were also found all over continental Europe. So a few may have intermingled with Palatine Germans, for example. So mine could be from more than one possible line on my maternal side.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by PDHOTLEN View Post
          All I can do about my own trace of Gypsy (assuming Gypsy, and not other Indian/So. Asian) is speculate. Gypsies were rounded up and sent as prisoners to tidewater Virginia by the British. But Gypsies were also found all over continental Europe. So a few may have intermingled with Palatine Germans, for example. So mine could be from more than one possible line on my maternal side.
          Do you have any sources for that? I'm interested in the general time period that might have happened.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by georgian1950 View Post
            Do you have any sources for that? I'm interested in the general time period that might have happened.
            No, it's just from my browsing around online; Anthrogenica, Historum, or right here. The British were doing that during the early 1700s.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by georgian1950 View Post
              Do you have any sources for that? I'm interested in the general time period that might have happened.
              Look at the Romany project, then click on news. They are mainly interested in Y-DNA. But I requested to join based on my maternal side (at Ancestry). I don't know whether or not Im accepted. They seem rather finicky.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by cokie View Post
                My Father was Ukrainian, my Mother NW Europe. I have 3% Central South Asian and only 37% Eastern Europe which is odd. How old is the Central South Asian?
                IMHO, this is due to FTDNA's oversimplification of Eastern European DNA. FTDNA apparently took some typical research samples of Baltic and Slavic speakers, and defined their DNA to be 100% Balto-Slavic (i.e, Eastern European). The problem in this is that research studies typically take samples from well-traveled urban areas, neglecting rural and mountainous areas. These latter typically harbor remnants of more ancient demographic strata.

                In Poland and Ukraine, in particular, FTDNA's Eastern European category appears to represent the DNA resulting from the Balto-Slavic expansion, but not the earlier populations (Celtic, Iranic, etc.) who inhabited the region prior to that expansion. Thus, a rural southern Pole might see 10% Scandinavian or British Isles on his MyOrigins--not because his ancestors came from those regions, but rather because (some of) the DNA in those regions came from southern Poland!

                In this diagram, note that the Central and Eastern Bell Beaker culture, colored in amber, occupied parts of southern Poland. Many now believe that those Central and Eastern Bell Beaker people expanded westward, eventually reaching the British Isles.

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