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My Origins Results......

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  • dna
    replied
    Originally posted by anksil View Post
    Getting 100.0% of one particular subcomponent is pretty impressive. [----]
    It might be impressive, but it is not uncommon.

    For example, 100% would always occur if you happen to come from one of the reference populations.

    Leave a comment:


  • Matt62
    replied
    Originally posted by anksil View Post
    Getting 100.0% of one particular subcomponent is pretty impressive.
    I reckon it is because the vast majority of my ancestors are Irish and Scottish, the latter mostly from places like Fife and Dumfries, so this would certainly lead the calculator/algorithm to see me as quite firmly placed in the British Isles. I've heard that Irish tends to lead to a very high BI and I assume Scottish is likely the same.

    Not to say that I am unhappy, merely that the result was so predictable for me and I do feel some disappointment at the German not showing any trace

    Leave a comment:


  • anksil
    replied
    Originally posted by Matt62 View Post
    As stated in the other thread, MyOrigin results put me as "100% British Isles" cluster. I was hoping for even just a smidgeon of West-Central Europe given that I do have a German line but nah...100% BI.
    Getting 100.0% of one particular subcomponent is pretty impressive. On another forum where we compared myOrigins results, the resident Norwegian was surprised by my Scandinavian percentage, evidently greater than his.

    I've noticed I have a very solid match from England, so perhaps there is something to that British component after all.

    Leave a comment:


  • Matt62
    replied
    As stated in the other thread, MyOrigin results put me as "100% British Isles" cluster. I was hoping for even just a smidgeon of West-Central Europe given that I do have a German line but nah...100% BI.

    Leave a comment:


  • anksil
    replied
    Swedish results

    Here are my results. I have no known non-Swedish admixture apart from one Belgian ancestor in the 1600s.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • junior
    replied
    Northeastern Brazilian results

    Here are my results:



    77% European
    - 70% Southern Europe
    - 7% Scandinavia
    10% African
    - 9% West Africa
    - 1% East Central Africa
    6% New World
    - 6% Native American
    5% Middle Eastern
    - 4% North Africa
    - 1% Eastern Middle East
    2% East Asian
    - 2% Northeast Asia

    Leave a comment:


  • Aperipatetic1
    replied
    Originally posted by MeteorMan View Post

    On the archeological side of things, there are many cases of unusually large skulls and bones found in mounds associated with Southern and Eastern Indians, a lot reported with double rows of teeth. They were excavated from the earthworks of the Moundbuilders.

    In terms of who populated the region, the North Eastern area is a known trade route of the Hopwell culture, including the Moundbuilders, and many tribes speak of battling with giants.

    These were all popular tales during the 19th and early 20th century, and you had a lot of private newspapers (many more than today) that were trying to increase circulation by promoting and publishing a lot of sensational stories intended to increase their readership. There were also early newspaper accounts commonly claiming that Bigfoot creatures had attacked hunting parties that were conveniently not from that town, and similar sensational claims.

    I think these stories are similar in many cases to the finding of genuinely old dinosaur bones by ancient peoples, eventually leading to tales of giant winged dragons or serpents. In modern cases there is often a profit motive to promote these sort of tales, and most often there is not preserved or extant bone or skeletal material to support the claims of finding any of these 'giants' or excavated populations whose remains exhibit a 'double-row of teeth' skull.

    I am not saying that some tribal populations may not have had some legends or stories about 'giants' etc.. but they also had stories about Skinwalkers that would turn into man/wolves and all this in my opinion falls into the same category of Mythology. I really would not waste much consideration of this as relates to population genetics given the absence of any valid reason to do so.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Yet again there has been an unusual looking cloud directly over where I live in Norwich. There has to be some type of meteorologist in the area noticing what is happening. The cloud spread very quickly beneath thick white clouds and had a dark consistency. Now the sun is beaming in between an area once full of clouds. Does this sound familiar?

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Consider that Agent Orange was classified as Top Secret, during Vietnam, now it is known as a mutagen. That was a long time ago, and technology has advanced by several orders of magnitude.

    Yes, it may be paranoia, but is backed up with accurate information.

    Leave a comment:


  • gatty
    replied
    Originally posted by MeteorMan View Post
    My health seems to be rapidly deteriorating, since posting here and I think someone has poisoned me. Let it be known that my name is Marcus Howard Aaron Dodd, son of William Howard Dodd, a Vietnam War Veteran, descended from slaves and American Indians.

    Marcus,your last two posts are worrying and indicate a high level of paranoia. Are you currently receiving psychiatric treatment and gone off medication, or if on medication finding it is not working as well? Even if such symptoms are new to you i think you should consider seeing a specialist in such matters ie a psychiatrist.
    If you want somewhere to talk that is more appropriate than here i recommend http://www.mentalhealthforum.net/ or if you are diagnosed with a schizophrenia illness http://forum.schizophrenia.com/

    Tim (Coming out of the closet as a chronic mental illness sufferer)

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Health

    My health seems to be rapidly deteriorating, since posting here and I think someone has poisoned me. Let it be known that my name is Marcus Howard Aaron Dodd, son of William Howard Dodd, a Vietnam War Veteran, descended from slaves and American Indians.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied

    I have noticed many strange things happening, around my home country, and city of Norwich, England. There is an unusually high amount of trails in the atmosphere. I know that they have been speculated to contain Nano-particles, so if anyone else has seen the same, know that it has been observed by myself as well.

    It may strike people as paranoia, what has been said, so if there are scientists who frequent these forums - specifically from City College Norwich, University of East Anglia or even hobbyist's, that have unusual readings, it has to be noted this could be related to what I have exposed on these forums.

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  • Armando
    replied
    Originally posted by thetick View Post
    Because of the lack of Native American samples for the reference population is clearly the reason.
    That is only part of the reason, which I included in my previous comments. It is not the only reason.
    Last edited by Armando; 15 July 2014, 12:16 PM.

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  • thetick
    replied
    Originally posted by Armando View Post
    None of that has anything to do with why people with supposed Native American ancestry are not getting Native American in their DNA results.
    Because of the lack of Native American samples for the reference population is clearly the reason.

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  • Armando
    replied
    Originally posted by MeteorMan View Post
    If you would like to use evolutionary terms, then you missed out the part about Bottle Necking due to external factors. And what about archaic humans? The ones that according to current Evolutionary Biology Theory, evolved and left Africa along with anatomically modern humans. Neanderthals (~250,000 yrs), Denisovans (>40,000 yrs), Cro-Magnon (43,000 yrs).

    What is particularly relevant about Cro-Magnon, is that he is theorised as being a hybrid of modern humans with Neanderthal. Polynesians and Australasians share a significant amount of DNA with Denisovans, and I believe also Neanderthal. Native Americans also have significant levels of archaic human DNA, most from Neanderthals, with a little contribution from Denisovans, according to current analysis.
    None of that has anything to do with why people with supposed Native American ancestry are not getting Native American in their DNA results.

    Leave a comment:

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