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Arriving ancestor 1580

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  • Arriving ancestor 1580

    A careful paper trail of my MGM line has “ended” in a quiet coastal corner of Norrth Lincolnshire in c.1580
    They were Sears in London but Sirre back then.
    Sirre is not English
    would a FF test help to pin down which continental country they originated? And if so who should test?

  • #2
    I don't know when you were born, but using 1950 as "the present", and 30 years as the average generation, 1580 was roughly 12 generations ago (more, if your date of birth is thirty years or more later than 1950). I'm not sure what you mean by "MGM line", but 12 generations back you had 4,096 ancestors. Only 19% of them contributed DNA to you, so 81% did not, and we don't know which ones did and which ones didn't, aside from your most recent ancestors, like your parents and grandparents, etc.. It's easier to tell with more recent ancestors, thanks to matching and the analysis of shared autosomal DNA segments.

    What I am trying to say is that autosomal DNA testing, like Family Finder, won't help you much with an ancestor as far back as 1580. The odds are 81% that you don't carry any autosomal DNA from that ancestor. If that ancestor was a Y-DNA ancestor, then you still carry his Y-chromosome. If that ancestor was a mtDNA ancestor, then you still carry her mtDNA. Thus Y-DNA and mtDNA are the only sure ways to connect genetically with an ancestor born in 1580.

    Of course, you could get lucky. That would mean getting a decent autosomal match to someone who shares with you as MRCA (Most Recent Common Ancestor) the ancestor born in 1580. The odds against that are great, and it would be difficult to know for sure, because you could have other ancestors in common that you just don't know about.
    Last edited by Stevo; 25 April 2021, 08:50 AM. Reason: Clarity

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    • #3
      Lansleyd, try other spellings from the Colchester area: Sayer, Sayers, Sayre, which are phonetic spellings. Supposedly, there was a Richard Sears who was exiled to Holland for religious reasons in 1537 and died there. A good website to explore the different spellings: https://www.genealogics.org/inde






      Last edited by Biblioteque; 11 April 2021, 09:16 AM.

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      • #4
        https://www.fabpedigree.com/

        Plug in Sears, Sayre, Sayer
        Last edited by Biblioteque; 11 April 2021, 09:22 AM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Stevo View Post
          but 12 generations back you had 4,096 ancestors. Only 19% of them contributed DNA to you, so 81% did not, and we don't know which ones did and which ones didn't.
          Hi, can you give me a link or other explanation which leads you to that statement of 19%-81%? Don't you have a little bit of DNA of absolutely every ancestor?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by lc0 View Post
            Hi, can you give me a link or other explanation which leads you to that statement of 19%-81%? Don't you have a little bit of DNA of absolutely every ancestor?
            Read pages 10-14 in David Reich's book, Who We Are and How We Got Here. There's an excellent explanation there, and the rest of the book is great, too. There is a handy graphic (Figure 4) on page 12 that is very helpful.

            Our genomes are just not large enough to accommodate genetic contributions from each of our ancestors, so much of their genetic material just kind of washes out over time. Here's a quote from page 11 of Reich's book:

            Originally posted by David Reich
            Ten generations back, for example, the number of ancestral stretches of DNA is around 757 but the number of ancestors is 1,024, guaranteeing that each person has several hundred ancestors from whom he or she has received no DNA whatsoever. Twenty generations in the past, the number of ancestors is almost a thousand times greater than the number of ancestral stretches of DNA in a person's genome, so it is a certainty that each person has not inherited any DNA from the great majority of his or her actual ancestors.

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            • #7
              I continue the theme above of a Sirre ( now revised to Sur/Surr) family arriving c.1580.
              My mother's FF FTDNA results are in and so far my impression is of many matches with people of German ancestry.
              The English/Irish/Welsh I can account for, but with so many German I starting to setlle on a German origin for the Sur/Sirre family.
              Does anyone disagree with this and knock down my hypothesis ?

              I am starting the mammoth task of e-mailing the 3000 matches but already I think the answer to my question Dutch/French/German is there

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