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Shared dna - percentage ranges?

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  • dna
    replied
    Originally posted by tlgarrison View Post
    Here are a few pages:
    Genomic variation in sharing between siblings
    http://gcbias.org/2014/01/26/genomic...ween-siblings/

    Autosomal DNA statistics
    http://www.isogg.org/wiki/Autosomal_DNA_statistics

    How much of your genome do you inherit from a particular grandparent?
    http://gcbias.org/2013/10/20/how-muc...r-grandparent/
    Thank you tlgarrison! These links with some comments should be a sticky in this forum and may be even in Family Finder Advanced Topics too.

    W.

    Leave a comment:


  • tlgarrison
    replied
    Originally posted by Haggis View Post
    Full siblings each inherit half their dna from each parent prior to recombination. After recombination their shared dna, as identified in an autosomal test, will be in some range around 50%. I suspect the distribution of shared dna among siblings over a large population would resemble a bell curve. But has anyone established just what that range might be in more practical terms? Would it be 30%-70%? 40% to 60%? Obviously if it gets close to 25% FTDNA would probably no longer identify them as full siblings.

    And taking it a step further - what kind of range might be expected for half siblings. The target would be 25% but could it go as high as 40%?

    Has any research been done in this area?
    Here are a few pages:
    Genomic variation in sharing between siblings
    http://gcbias.org/2014/01/26/genomic...ween-siblings/

    Autosomal DNA statistics
    http://www.isogg.org/wiki/Autosomal_DNA_statistics

    How much of your genome do you inherit from a particular grandparent?
    http://gcbias.org/2013/10/20/how-muc...r-grandparent/

    Leave a comment:


  • Haggis
    started a topic Shared dna - percentage ranges?

    Shared dna - percentage ranges?

    Full siblings each inherit half their dna from each parent prior to recombination. After recombination their shared dna, as identified in an autosomal test, will be in some range around 50%. I suspect the distribution of shared dna among siblings over a large population would resemble a bell curve. But has anyone established just what that range might be in more practical terms? Would it be 30%-70%? 40% to 60%? Obviously if it gets close to 25% FTDNA would probably no longer identify them as full siblings.

    And taking it a step further - what kind of range might be expected for half siblings. The target would be 25% but could it go as high as 40%?

    Has any research been done in this area?
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