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  • Confirmation Requested

    Hello,

    I recently contacted a match (let’s call her K) who is adopted and a transfer from AncestryDNA and sent her daughter the GEDCOM for the kit (let’s call him J) that I manage. She noticed that K had A LOT of matches at AncestryDNA who share ancestors from J’s maternal side. The longest matching block for K and J is on chromosome 1 as follows:

    Start Location: 162870746
    End Location: 204406197
    cM: 41.48
    Matching SNPs: 10297

    The snag is that J has a confirmed match here at FTDNA from his maternal side (let’s call her M) who is NOT a match to K. M and J share a longest block on chromosome 1 as follows:

    Start Location: 171384394
    End Location: 200235705
    cM: 23.6
    Matching SNPs: 6200

    I’m seeking to confirm that K and M are matching J on different strands of chromosome 1 and as such K’s shared segment with J comes from J’s paternal side and not his maternal side since FTDNA did not match K to M.

    Please let me know if any further clarification is needed. Thank you in advance!!
    Last edited by phje; 4 October 2014, 04:58 PM.

  • #3
    The FAQ's posted don't really apply to phje's situation. Yes it would be safe to assume that K and J are related through J's paternal side. I do agree it can't be said 100% though as I've had many "confirmed" autosomal matches through the various DNA testing companies where I assume they are related to either my father's paternal or maternal side based on shared ancestors from that side only to find the DNA in actuality is coming from the opposite side. I found this out when I did DNA testing on my father and grandmother. So if J and M share a common maternal ancestor(s) but the shared DNA is actually coming from J's paternal side (through another unknown shared ancestor) than K and J could still be related through J's maternal side.

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    • #4
      Originally posted by travers View Post
      The FAQ's posted don't really apply to phje's situation. Yes it would be safe to assume that K and J are related through J's paternal side. I do agree it can't be said 100% though as I've had many "confirmed" autosomal matches through the various DNA testing companies where I assume they are related to either my father's paternal or maternal side based on shared ancestors from that side only to find the DNA in actuality is coming from the opposite side. I found this out when I did DNA testing on my father and grandmother. So if J and M share a common maternal ancestor(s) but the shared DNA is actually coming from J's paternal side (through another unknown shared ancestor) than K and J could still be related through J's maternal side.
      I meant to point out that since for distant relationships one deals with low probabilities, one cannot make definitive statements of that type. For all we know about DNA inheritance, the values presented by the original poster are too small to guarantee such definitive claims.

      Family Finder is a tool that points out likely relationships and their expected range. Family Finder, beyond the immediate and close family, is not a tool that would prove any relationship or determine its nature (let's say for a nephew, Family Finder would offer all of these: half sibling, grandparent/grandchild, aunt/uncle, niece/nephew).

      So instead of a statement
      it would be safe to assume that K and J are related through J's paternal side
      your next one
      it can't be said 100%
      should be used. And since it is not 100% (and in this case nowhere close to 100%) the claim cannot be substantiated... Back to paper...

      Comment


      • #5
        Originally posted by travers View Post
        So if J and M share a common maternal ancestor(s) but the shared DNA is actually coming from J's paternal side (through another unknown shared ancestor) than K and J could still be related through J's maternal side.
        I do agree with what you are saying.

        I neglected to mention in my first post that J's paternal ancestry is German. His paternal grandmother immigrated to the United States as a girl and spoke with a heavy accent all her life. His paternal grandfather was the son of German immigrants. M has no known, at least according her paper trail, German ancestors. I think this is why I didn't give that scenario much weight.

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