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  • Family Finder SNPs

    MC1R SNPs in the FF raw data.
    rs3212361
    rs885479
    rs2228478
    rs2228479
    rs1805005
    rs1805006
    rs1805008
    rs1110400
    Neanderthal SNPs at Family Finder!!!!
    rs10800485*T T
    rs6670818*A A*
    rs16845098*T C
    rs17503834*T C
    rs4692788*T T
    rs963660* TC
    rs17254301*C C
    rs10484939* A G
    rs17226291*C T
    rs11792454*C T
    rs17324630*T T
    rs1330692* TC
    rs16918958*C C
    rs16917040*T T
    rs12416000*G G
    rs11252810*TC
    rs11815066*G G
    rs10852939*C C
    rs16965666*T T
    rs4794826* CC
    rs9609421*A A
    rs17745316*G G
    rs7536180*C C
    rs10494778*A A
    rs17430552*T T
    rs332951*TC

    I am not sure what this SNP is for, rs11584700GG.

  • #2
    If anyone matches me in these SNPs they are my cousins.
    My SNPs in the Family Finder raw data.
    rs10800485*T T
    rs6670818*A A*
    rs16845098*T C
    rs17503834*T C
    rs4692788*T T
    rs963660* TC
    rs17254301*C C
    rs10484939* A G
    rs17226291*C T
    rs11792454*C T
    rs17324630*T T
    rs1330692* TC
    rs16918958*C C
    rs16917040*T T
    rs12416000*G G
    rs11252810*TC
    rs11815066*G G
    rs10852939*C C
    rs16965666*T T
    rs4794826* CC
    rs9609421*A A
    rs17745316*G G
    rs7536180*C C
    rs10494778*A A
    rs17430552*T T
    rs332951*TC

    Comment


    • #3
      red hair SNPs

      MC1R SNPs in the FF raw data.
      rs3212361
      rs885479
      rs2228478
      rs2228479
      rs1805005
      rs1805006
      rs1805008
      rs1110400
      I looked these SNPs up at SNPedia.com and this is what it says about rs1805008;

      "rs1805008, known as Arg160Trp or R160W, is one of several SNPs in the MC1R gene associated with red hair color (redheads), in this case in an Irish population [PMID 9665397] although this has also been reported in Icelandic and Dutch populations [PMID 18488028].
      The risk allele is rs1805008(T), compared with the wild-type rs1805008(C) allele."


      From Wilipedia;
      "The term "wild type" allele is sometimes used to describe an allele that is thought to contribute to the typical phenotypic character as seen in "wild" populations of organisms, such as fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster). Such a "wild type" allele was historically regarded as dominant, common, and normal, in contrast to "mutant" alleles regarded as recessive, rare, and frequently deleterious. It was commonly thought that most individuals were homozygous for the "wild type" allele at most gene loci, and that any alternative "mutant" allele was found in homozygous form in a small minority of "affected" individuals, often as*genetic diseases, and more frequently in heterozygous form in "carriers" for the mutant allele. It is now appreciated that most or all gene loci are highly polymorphic, with multiple alleles, whose frequencies vary from population to population, and that a great deal of genetic variation is hidden in the form of alleles that do not produce obvious phenotypic differences."
      Last edited by 1798; 9 March 2014, 02:22 PM. Reason: mistake

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by 1798 View Post
        If anyone matches me in these SNPs they are my cousins.
        If you define cousins as a common ancestor many tens of thousands years ago then yes. A few SNPs matching does not mean you are genealogical cousins which is generally what the term cousins means at genealogical forum.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by thetick View Post
          If you define cousins as a common ancestor many tens of thousands years ago then yes. A few SNPs matching does not mean you are genealogical cousins which is generally what the term cousins means at genealogical forum.
          I wanted to know whether or not everyone who took the FF test matched me in those SNPs that I posted. I didn't get any answers yet. I know also that if a person has a unique SNP then that one SNP is enough to identify him and all his cousins.
          Last edited by 1798; 9 March 2014, 04:43 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by 1798 View Post
            I know also that if a person has a unique SNP then that one SNP is enough to identify him and all his cousins.
            Well you can believe what you want but the science of genetics does not back the above statement. FTDNA and 23andme require huge regions of matching factoring in recombination frequency (measured in centimorgans) with minimal error to identify matches.

            To test your (I know ...) theory go to gedmatch and run the rare SNP utility on yourself and cousins. I think you will be quite surprised.
            Last edited by thetick; 9 March 2014, 05:33 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by thetick View Post
              Well you can believe what you want but the science of genetics does not back the above statement. FTDNA and 23andme require huge regions of matching factoring in recombination frequency (measured in centimorgans) with minimal error to identify matches.

              To test your (I know ...) theory go to gedmatch and run the rare SNP utility on yourself and cousins. I think you will be quite surprised.
              Some of the experts say that a Y SNP happens every three to five generations so my family and I have a SNP that no-one else has. I dont know what the rate is for autosomal dna.
              All I am saying is that once that SNP is found then those that have it will be my closest relatives.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by 1798 View Post
                Some of the experts say that a Y SNP happens every three to five generations so my family and I have a SNP that no-one else has. I dont know what the rate is for autosomal dna.
                All I am saying is that once that SNP is found then those that have it will be my closest relatives.
                Family Finder single SNP's should be looked at a little differently then YDNA due to the recombination of parents maternal and paternal chromosomes when they are passed onto children generation to generation.
                Where as Y DNA does not recombine it is passed on virtually unchanged generation to generation.

                If you where able to view yDNA in Family Finder chromosome browser, you would probably see someone who is R-L165 and R-L176.2(L165-) as pretty much a full match across the y chromosome. Genetic code of A,C,T and G for each SNP/position will be the same except for at location where L165 is located, it will have its own unique value, while same position in R-L176.2(L165-) person will have ancestral value.

                With Chromosomes 1-22 you need more then just a Single SNP to be considered a genealogical close relative, you need multiple in a row to create a certain accepted length(due to recombination maternal and paternal chromosomes).for example a segment with length of 9cM and 989SNP.

                A single SNP on chromosomes 1-22 ,in most cases may just suggest an ancestral population like Irish over Italian, if you do not have a segment of multiple identical SNP's you will not be in close relationship.
                Last edited by prairielad; 10 March 2014, 06:30 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by prairielad View Post
                  Family Finder single SNP's should be looked at a little differently then YDNA due to the recombination of parents maternal and paternal chromosomes when they are passed onto children generation to generation.
                  Where as Y DNA does not recombine it is passed on virtually unchanged generation to generation.

                  If you where able to view yDNA in Family Finder chromosome browser, you would probably see someone who is R-L165 and R-L176.2(L165-) as pretty much a full match across the y chromosome. Genetic code of A,C,T and G for each SNP/position will be the same except for at location where L165 is located, it will have its own unique value, while same position in R-L176.2(L165-) person will have ancestral value.

                  With Chromosomes 1-22 you need more then just a Single SNP to be considered a genealogical close relative, you need multiple in a row to create a certain accepted length(due to recombination maternal and paternal chromosomes).for example a segment with length of 9cM and 989SNP.

                  A single SNP on chromosomes 1-22 ,in most cases may just suggest an ancestral population like Irish over Italian, if you do not have a segment of multiple identical SNP's you will not be in close relationship.
                  Thanks,I understand.
                  There are 69,3720 in my FF raw data file. How many of these SNPs are specific to me? If there are say 60,000 why does FTDNA send me the whole file instead of those that are specific to me?
                  Autosomal SNPs must happen in every generation so the people whose ancestors have lived in an area for a long period would have different autosomal dna to other regions. I was eligible for the Irish dna atlas project but I didn't take part because they wanted my family details and my dna and they were giving nothing in return.
                  With the FF test for 99 dollars I have my raw data,my population results and a lot of new cousins.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by 1798 View Post
                    Thanks,I understand.
                    There are 69,3720 in my FF raw data file. How many of these SNPs are specific to me? If there are say 60,000 why does FTDNA send me the whole file instead of those that are specific to me?
                    None are absolutely specific to you. Chips are designed using "common" variants, which typically means the minor allele frequency (MAF)is at least 1% to 5% of the population, depending on the size of the chip. But it would indeed be interesting to know which of your SNPs have the less common allele.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Ann Turner View Post
                      None are absolutely specific to you. Chips are designed using "common" variants, which typically means the minor allele frequency (MAF)is at least 1% to 5% of the population, depending on the size of the chip. But it would indeed be interesting to know which of your SNPs have the less common allele.
                      I would like to know as well.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Ann Turner View Post
                        None are absolutely specific to you. Chips are designed using "common" variants, which typically means the minor allele frequency (MAF)is at least 1% to 5% of the population, depending on the size of the chip. But it would indeed be interesting to know which of your SNPs have the less common allele.
                        FTDNA could put in all the major alleles in the raw data and then we could extract those with the minor alleles.
                        I still dont understand why I have a CC at certain SNPs and my son has say TC.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by 1798 View Post
                          FTDNA could put in all the major alleles in the raw data and then we could extract those with the minor alleles.
                          I still dont understand why I have a CC at certain SNPs and my son has say TC.
                          If you have CC, one C is on your paternal chromosome, the other on your maternal chromosome. We have 2 of each chromosome (chromosome 1-22)

                          you would only pass one of them on to your son (maternal and paternal chromosome recombination). So the C son has is from you(on his paternal chromosome) and the T is from his mother(on his maternal chromosome).

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by prairielad View Post
                            If you have CC, one C is on your paternal chromosome, the other on your maternal chromosome. We have 2 of each chromosome (chromosome 1-22)

                            you would only pass one of them on to your son (maternal and paternal chromosome recombination). So the C son has is from you(on his paternal chromosome) and the T is from his mother(on his maternal chromosome).

                            How then did I end up with the CC in the first instance, one each from my father and mother? If I got a FF test for my son it would be a lot of work separating my SNPs from his mothers.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Ann Turner View Post
                              None are absolutely specific to you. Chips are designed using "common" variants, which typically means the minor allele frequency (MAF)is at least 1% to 5% of the population, depending on the size of the chip. But it would indeed be interesting to know which of your SNPs have the less common allele.
                              I got an email from FTDNA saying that all the 69,000 plus SNPs in my FF test are specific to me.

                              Comment

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