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Chromosome Browser

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  • Chromosome Browser

    I am new to Family Finder and genetic genealogy, but I do know a lot about my family tree. There are several people who I am a distant cousin to (known) and I noticed that their chromosome matches are on chromosome #1. I know that two of the three share a specific ancestor with me. The third match has a long sequence that matches me on chromosome #1. We were in touch before I got tested because we believe we share a fairly close common ancestor. If correct, he and I are 6th cousins. I am about a 17th cousin to the other two. Do all 4 of us share a common ancestor and does this mean that the 6th cousin and I also share that common (distant) ancestor with the other two?

    Related to this, on chromosome #7, two people share nearly the exact same area with me, and they have common surnames in their profile, so I assume that they are cousins of each other. They are also Romanian and I know my Ashkenazi family moved West to East from Spain/France/Italy/Germany into Eastern Europe, ending up in Lithuania. It seems like I have a lot of Romanian matches too. Will it turn out that #7 represents a common ancestor also? I assume so. Now I need to figure out why so many Romanians match me!

  • #2
    Sorry, NOT Chromosome #7

    The Romanian match is a long sequence on #12 and a shorter sequence on #13. The two match each other on both those chromosomes. I'm sure they know that they are cousins!

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    • #3
      http://www.familytreedna.com/faq/answers.aspx?id=17#845

      If these segments you are referring to are your longest segment matches it is possible.

      All of you would need to see the other two in your match lists. If they see each other and you, and you see them then yes as long as its all by the longest segment.

      If they don't see each other but you see them then they are not related by a common ancestor to each other, just you are in common to them. As an example your father might be related to one and your mother the other making you the common relative yet not related by a common ancestor.

      Matt

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      • #4
        Makes sense

        That makes perfect sense Matt. Thanks. The two with the perfect overlap are father and daughter and we are exploring shared ancestors - we have the name of someone both our families descend from.

        I will query the others, on Chromosome #1, if they see each other. Excellent point.

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