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How It Works 3 - for Newbies

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  • #16
    Thank you, Matt. That's very clear. I hadn't realized SNPs were composed of pairs, and that a match was declared if either half of the SNP matched.

    Cheers,

    Rob
    Last edited by robdrew7; 22 June 2011, 02:38 PM. Reason: used a wrong term

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    • #17
      pushed my paternal lineage to Northern Ireland

      [QUOTE=mkdexter;324437]Now think about this. If she, the grandchild here, happens to have any person match in the blue area who also matches her father, that person is related to grandpa (father's father). If she happens to have any person match in the orange area who also matches her father, that person is related to grandma (father's mother).QUOTE]

      It is important to know then, considering all matches would then be grouped according to Paternal or Maternal lines. My own chromosomes are 22 solid dark bars (no Parents), but I did notice two matches, which I know one to be Maternal and the other Paternal according to matching lineages. The Maternal on the top as indicated by the orange matches and the Paternal on the bottom as indicated by the blue matches. Odly enough in orange and blue respectively.

      Is this telling me to organize the rest of the matches?

      I'm not even familiar with which chromosome is is what or anything else. I have however pushed my paternal lineage to Northern Ireland by help interpreting a mutation in my YDNA.

      Bob

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      • #18
        Great explanation, Although I understand but didn't remember the exact concept so I saved it whenever I'll have the chance to make a initiative to find family I'll surely recall this. Thanks you guys. !!!!

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        • #19
          Thank you Matt! A brilliant guide!

          -Kai

          PS: you're missing a word on page 10 as it starts with "Here the same brother".

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          • #20
            This attachment in PDF format has a few updates to the other ones on this thread.

            Matt.
            Attached Files

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            • #21
              Dont forget to also click the download to excell link as it often shows more shared segments.

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              • #22
                Interesting document Matt. Thanks for sharing.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by mkdexter View Post
                  This attachment in PDF format has a few updates to the other ones on this thread.

                  Matt.

                  Bravo.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by mkdexter
                    Please see attached PDF for information about the X chromosome and some sample comparisons to my family's tests.

                    Matt Dexter.
                    ditto Bravo.

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                    • #25
                      Thank you,

                      Matt.

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                      • #26
                        Great job, Matt! I have a decent of understanding of X inheritance, in theory. But seeing actual examples makes it much clearer.

                        Do you know if John Olson or anyone else has a tally of (anonymous) X chromosome comparisons and their actual relationships? It would be incredibly helpful if there was a public database, so good statistics on recombination could be computed.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by nathanm View Post
                          Great job, Matt! I have a decent of understanding of X inheritance, in theory. But seeing actual examples makes it much clearer.

                          Do you know if John Olson or anyone else has a tally of (anonymous) X chromosome comparisons and their actual relationships? It would be incredibly helpful if there was a public database, so good statistics on recombination could be computed.
                          John had an interest the other day and I would not be surprised if he's trying to find some now.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by nathanm View Post
                            Do you know if John Olson or anyone else has a tally of (anonymous) X chromosome comparisons and their actual relationships? It would be incredibly helpful if there was a public database, so good statistics on recombination could be computed.
                            Unfortunately, I don't track actual relationships, so I don't have any way of correlating that with X matches. That's one reason I was glad to see Matt publish the comparison of his family. I would encourage others who have had their family tested for several generations to do the same.

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                            • #29
                              X-Chromosome Sharing from my kits

                              corrected a table that stated 100% when I meant 50%. The wording is right, the text in the table had a typo.. Corrected here...
                              Attached Files

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by JOlson View Post
                                Unfortunately, I don't track actual relationships, so I don't have any way of correlating that with X matches. That's one reason I was glad to see Matt publish the comparison of his family. I would encourage others who have had their family tested for several generations to do the same.
                                Would it be possible to do the next best thing, and estimate the relationship based on the amount of shared autosomal DNA? Parent-child relationships should be fairly consistent. Then determine whether it's maternal or paternal depending on the sex of the parent, which you could tell based on whether they have one or two alleles for each bp on the X chromosome. Would something like that even be feasible, or do I assume too much? I'm not trying to make more work for you; just thinking out loud.

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