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  • #16
    I took a trip to Ireland a few years ago, and it was frustrating how difficult it is to do genealogical research there. It's easier to just go to the LDS library in Salt Lake and use http://www.rootsireland.ie/ which has most of the Church records digitized. They are now offering subscriptions rather than paying per record.

    Each of the Counties in Ireland set up Family History Centres, but they aren't open to do free research. I think all they really are for is selling expensive printouts of their records. I had research done by one of the Family History center on my (adoptive) mom's family and it took 5 years for them to get to it due to the backlog and there are so many missing church records they couldn't really conclude much of anything nor would they look in adjacent counties for any records. It was pretty much $600 for nothing and I found out way more in Salt Lake with Irish records they didn't have there.

    http://www.irishgenealogy.ie/en/ is free and has the more recent 1901 and 1911 censuses which could help anyone looking for more recent family members and they also have a lot of the Dublin church record that aren't on RootsIreland.
    Last edited by CuriousAdoptee; 24th November 2014, 08:56 PM.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by CuriousAdoptee View Post
      I took a trip to Ireland a few years ago, and it was frustrating how difficult it is to do genealogical research there. It's easier to just go to the LDS library in Salt Lake and use http://www.rootsireland.ie/ which has most of the Church records digitized. They are now offering subscriptions rather than paying per record.

      Each of the Counties in Ireland set up Family History Centres, but they aren't open to do free research. I think all they really are for is selling expensive printouts of their records. I had research done by one of the Family History center on my (adoptive) mom's family and it took 5 years for them to get to it due to the backlog and there are so many missing church records they couldn't really conclude much of anything nor would they look in adjacent counties for any records. It was pretty much $600 for nothing and I found out way more in Salt Lake with Irish records they didn't have there.

      http://www.irishgenealogy.ie/en/ is free and has the more recent 1901 and 1911 censuses which could help anyone looking for more recent family members and they also have a lot of the Dublin church record that aren't on RootsIreland.
      The http://www.irish-genealogy-toolkit.com/ site is the best site for advice about Irish records.

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      • #18
        Don't forget Ireland doesn't always mean Republic of Ireland - there are the six counties of Northern Ireland to check too.

        Most of my relatives were from these six counties and there are plenty of really good websites for precise info.

        Good ones to use are GRONI online - this is website of general registry office of NI - contains every birth from registration began in 1864 to 1914, plus marriages 1845-1940 and deaths 1864-1964. An extra month's records are added every month. You can confirm dates of birth for free or purchase online records for UK£2 each.

        Another is the website of PRONI where wills etc can be found and info on what Church records survive.

        Also there is Emerald Ancestors (subscription) - lists most marriages from 1864 to about 1914 - useful to do searches under both surnames of bride and groom.

        Northern Ireland records are held separately from other Irish records as it is part of the United Kingdom. The person on here who mentioned they couldn't find a birth date for Ellen Kelly listed may not have checked Northern Irish records?

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Lucky View Post
          Don't forget Ireland doesn't always mean Republic of Ireland - there are the six counties of Northern Ireland to check too.

          Most of my relatives were from these six counties and there are plenty of really good websites for precise info.

          Good ones to use are GRONI online - this is website of general registry office of NI - contains every birth from registration began in 1864 to 1914, plus marriages 1845-1940 and deaths 1864-1964. An extra month's records are added every month. You can confirm dates of birth for free or purchase online records for UK£2 each.

          Another is the website of PRONI where wills etc can be found and info on what Church records survive.

          Also there is Emerald Ancestors (subscription) - lists most marriages from 1864 to about 1914 - useful to do searches under both surnames of bride and groom.

          Northern Ireland records are held separately from other Irish records as it is part of the United Kingdom. The person on here who mentioned they couldn't find a birth date for Ellen Kelly listed may not have checked Northern Irish records?
          A lot of records relating to NI before 1922 can be found in the NAI, http://www.nationalarchives.ie/

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          • #20
            My story pertaining to some of the Irish sites already mentioned in this thread:

            IrelandXO.com - went there a couple of years ago, to the county page for some of my Irish ancestors. Saw a post there mentioning these ancestors of mine, which turned out to be from a relative I didn't know (2nd cousin). I contacted the person, and it evolved into us helping each other out with some gaps in our mutual traditional genealogy. Leading to. . .

            rootsireland.ie - I had used their database, but never ordered records. It turned out that both my aforementioned cousin and I had paid a Heritage center to do some genealogy research (we were doing parallel research before we knew of each other). Although they did find information for our common maternal ancestor, they could not find records for our common paternal ancestor. It turned out he had changed his name to a variant, after coming to the U.S. Their reply to my cousin (but not in their reply to me) said they'd also checked for this original surname, as well as the variant he changed to, but couldn't find him or his family. Later, she used their database, and found the baptism and marriage for this paternal ancestor, and his parents' marriage, all with the original surname! So that was disappointing, with both of us paying for research, neither getting that particular information, and then her paying afterward for records in the database to solve it.

            I also was able to check the church records on FHL microfilm for these common ancestors, which fortunately go back to the late 1700s, and although very hard to read, they do verify what is in the rootsireland.ie database. I give credit to the Heritage Center for being able to interpret the handwriting better than I could.

            Lucky - thanks for your tips. I have other Irish ancestors that may have come from Northern Ireland (separately, and married in U.S.), but so far have no clues about what counties, most parents' names, etc. If I ever figure that out, I will use your advice.

            I'm also checking out the irish-genealogy-toolkit.com site.
            Last edited by KATM; 25th November 2014, 09:20 AM.

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            • #21
              The National Library of Ireland (NLI) has today unveiled details of its most ambitious digitisation project to date. The project will see the Library’s entire collection of Catholic parish register microfilms made available online – for free – by summer 2015. - See more at: http://www.irishgenealogynews.com/#sthash.lIQgQ5gE.dpuf

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              • #22
                Originally posted by 1798 View Post
                The National Library of Ireland (NLI) has today unveiled details of its most ambitious digitisation project to date. The project will see the Library’s entire collection of Catholic parish register microfilms made available online – for free – by summer 2015. - See more at: http://www.irishgenealogynews.com/#sthash.lIQgQ5gE.dpuf
                Since the they will not be transcribed or indexed by the NLI I'm wondering if there will be a genealogical group that will work towards making an index. You would think that with the Internet and the number of people of Irish descent around the world that there should be enough people willing to work together to index the records.

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