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  • Irish Genealogy Help

    For those with Irish ancestry -Just wanted to share an interesting Irish
    genealogy site I recently found. Irelandxo.com is a free site for those like myself who are searching for info on their Irish roots. Once you register, you can then post a query on their message boards. They have a group of volunteer genealogists from that county, parrish or town review the messages and help you in your search.They also offer a unique DNA testing program ( with 23&me ), to identify Irish cousins

  • #2
    Hmm, their DNA page and the idea of telling someone what parish their ancestors are from is very misleading.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Naughtius View Post
      Hmm, their DNA page and the idea of telling someone what parish their ancestors are from is very misleading.
      I think I agree, although I'm not against the general idea of making some sort of effort.

      My thought is that the Irish population--and the Irish Diaspora population even more so--has always been a great deal more diverse and mobile than some people may like to think. In short, they're wayyyyyyyyyyyyy over simplifying.

      But I suspect that's just what the business world calls "puffery", a supposedly harmless indifference to precision in advertising claims. It may not be the most ethically rigorous approach, yet it's so common that any objections are likely to be met with laughter or indifference.

      Do you have another take on this?

      Comment


      • #4
        I think this is the company they are using, going by his methodology i wouldn't be Irish. Then there is the whole male line daughtering out issue. But a good data base of irish DNA can be a good thing (autosomnal I hope).

        http://www.irishorigenes.com/

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Naughtius View Post
          I think this is the company they are using, going by his methodology i wouldn't be Irish. Then there is the whole male line daughtering out issue. But a good data base of irish DNA can be a good thing (autosomnal I hope).

          http://www.irishorigenes.com/
          Yes, the claims on that site do seem a little bold.

          Comment


          • #6
            Bold - yes

            Originally posted by Frederator View Post
            Yes, the claims on that site do seem a little bold.


            But that is called marketing. One ALWAYS has to take these types of claims with the proverbial " grain of salt"; I do however remember reading about a study by Brian Sykes about Irish clans DNA. (Y DNA I suppose)

            Comment


            • #7
              I am not sure about the coment of the "male line daughtering out issue" since the company they are using is 23&me which cover Y, X and autosomal SNPs.

              I know the location of my paternal Irish great parents who were born in the mid 1800s. Both pair are married in the 1901 census and living in the same townland consisting of 13 households. Some of the other households were also relatives. The Griffiths Valuation (1850), Tithe Applotments (1827), Baptisms, and Marriages put most of these families in the same RC Parish back to around 1800. However, for someone whose relatives left Ireland without documentation of where they were born, this maybe beneficial. For some people I think this program will help them make connections with others who do know their ancestors or at least give them a location to start their search. As some one said, if nothing else this will expand the Irish DNA database.

              My reason for DNA testing is mainly my English mother's family from London where there are people not in some censuses, missing marriage certificates, and perhaps NPEs in the 1800s that are causing stone walls. I have tested with FTDNA and I now awaiting my 23&me results.

              Comment


              • #8
                Irish DNA

                Originally posted by Mike McG View Post
                I am not sure about the coment of the "male line daughtering out issue" since the company they are using is 23&me which cover Y, X and autosomal SNPs.

                I know the location of my paternal Irish great parents who were born in the mid 1800s. Both pair are married in the 1901 census and living in the same townland consisting of 13 households. Some of the other households were also relatives. The Griffiths Valuation (1850), Tithe Applotments (1827), Baptisms, and Marriages put most of these families in the same RC Parish back to around 1800. However, for someone whose relatives left Ireland without documentation of where they were born, this maybe beneficial. For some people I think this program will help them make connections with others who do know their ancestors or at least give them a location to start their search. As some one said, if nothing else this will expand the Irish DNA database.

                My reason for DNA testing is mainly my English mother's family from London where there are people not in some censuses, missing marriage certificates, and perhaps NPEs in the 1800s that are causing stone walls. I have tested with FTDNA and I now awaiting my 23&me results.
                Mike, thats precisely why I tested with FTDNA and Ancestry. My maternal Irish grandmothers life before 1920 is a complete brick wall.No parents names, brothers or sisters or where they were from in Ireland. I have tried every resource available and yet she is a total brick wall. All I know is her name and birth date.She claimed ( on every census) that she was born in New York but there is no record to be found. I do however, have quite a few DNA matches with ancestors in Roscommon Ireland area. I knowto find a match with a common ancestor there would be like hitting the 500 mil lottery, but thats all I have to go on at this point.
                My maternal grandfathers line goes back to England to about the 1100's and is so well documented I feel like I know them like my immediate family.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Mike McG View Post
                  I am not sure about the coment of the "male line daughtering out issue" since the company they are using is 23&me which cover Y, X and autosomal SNPs.

                  I know the location of my paternal Irish great parents who were born in the mid 1800s. Both pair are married in the 1901 census and living in the same townland consisting of 13 households. Some of the other households were also relatives. The Griffiths Valuation (1850), Tithe Applotments (1827), Baptisms, and Marriages put most of these families in the same RC Parish back to around 1800. However, for someone whose relatives left Ireland without documentation of where they were born, this maybe beneficial. For some people I think this program will help them make connections with others who do know their ancestors or at least give them a location to start their search. As some one said, if nothing else this will expand the Irish DNA database.

                  My reason for DNA testing is mainly my English mother's family from London where there are people not in some censuses, missing marriage certificates, and perhaps NPEs in the 1800s that are causing stone walls. I have tested with FTDNA and I now awaiting my 23&me results.
                  It looks like the company is using screen shots of Y matches from FTDNA on its website which suggests they are defining where you are from based on Y lineages. What I meant with the daughtering out comment is that if a male line dies out in a region then their test will miss out on heir version of someones ancestry.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by SCnMD View Post
                    Mike, thats precisely why I tested with FTDNA and Ancestry. My maternal Irish grandmothers life before 1920 is a complete brick wall.No parents names, brothers or sisters or where they were from in Ireland. I have tried every resource available and yet she is a total brick wall. All I know is her name and birth date.She claimed ( on every census) that she was born in New York but there is no record to be found. I do however, have quite a few DNA matches with ancestors in Roscommon Ireland area. I knowto find a match with a common ancestor there would be like hitting the 500 mil lottery, but thats all I have to go on at this point.
                    My maternal grandfathers line goes back to England to about the 1100's and is so well documented I feel like I know them like my immediate family.
                    If you have the name and birth date of your maternal Irish grandmother then you could look in the Irish records.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Naughtius View Post
                      It looks like the company is using screen shots of Y matches from FTDNA on its website which suggests they are defining where you are from based on Y lineages. What I meant with the daughtering out comment is that if a male line dies out in a region then their test will miss out on heir version of someones ancestry.
                      Naughtius

                      The link to the DNA page on the site that SCnMD refered to, Irelandxo.com, is http://www.irelandxo.com/trace-your-irish-roots-dna . I agree with the comments that their claims are "Bold", especially since they are referring to only testing one individual from each Civil Parish without regard to religion or age (although "most local" could be intended to include age). They really need a much greater number of samples to do this, but every bit of data may help.

                      I see you showed a link for Irishorigenes which does appear to use FTDNA YDNA37 data but I think he is only trying to identify where the male line originated.

                      Mike McG

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by SCnMD View Post
                        For those with Irish ancestry -Just wanted to share an interesting Irish
                        genealogy site I recently found. Irelandxo.com is a free site for those like myself who are searching for info on their Irish roots. Once you register, you can then post a query on their message boards. They have a group of volunteer genealogists from that county, parrish or town review the messages and help you in your search.They also offer a unique DNA testing program ( with 23&me ), to identify Irish cousins
                        How are they going to identify Irish cousins when the Irish living in Ireland dont want to test?
                        FTDNA has 14,064 Y lines of Irish descent in their records.I think that they represent all of the lines of the Irish people in Ireland today, as they are all descended from people whose ancestors left within the last 300 years.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I registered

                          I registered with their site, and emailed them. They replied to me, and explained that they are in their infancy, so when their database gets larger, they can compare my dna results and help me better. My ydna 12-25 markers show Scotland roots, and my mtdna results show Northern Ireland roots, so maybe when their database is larger, they can be of more help to me.



                          Best Regards, Douglas W. Fisher-Kit#122883
                          Paternal: R1b-U106+Z18+Z14+Z372+
                          Maternal: V19

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by 1798 View Post
                            If you have the name and birth date of your maternal Irish grandmother then you could look in the Irish records.
                            Yes, I tried using her name and date of birth and came up empty handed. LOTS of Ellen Kellys in Ireland ! If I could just narrow it down to a couple of general areas it would be easier. Not even sure she was ever in Ireland. She claimed she was born in New York City to parents from Ireland Free State. (New York Vital records has no record of her being born there )

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              irishorigenes

                              I used Dr. Tyrone Bowes service over a year ago. I didn't go in blind but also did not have a lot of info regarding my Irish ancestors. We had one clue on a grave marker in Canada for someone who might be related which said, “Native of County Tyrone”. I have never paid for any genealogy service in the past. I am also dealing with a very common surname for Ireland, "HENRY". After providing the limited info I had along with links to a HENRY surname project with 100s of donors Dr. Bowes provided a report that supported some of my ideas on my ancestor's possible locations. Problem again is the common surname but, analysing Dr. Bowes report I confirmed some of my original genealogy thinking regarding where my ancestors may have originated. Utilizing maps provided by Dr. Bowes was also interesting and educational. One of my cousins hired a researcher in Ireland a couple of years ago and we have collectively focused on a specific county and a couple of parishes. We may never find documentation to support or research but it has been worth the expense and efforts.
                              You need to have some initial ideas of where your ancestors may have lived in Ireland, some additional supporting DNA such as found in larger surname projects and any other hints that may help before ordering a project from Dr. Bowes.

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