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FF v. Y Matches

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  • FF v. Y Matches

    My father in law has thousands of 12 marker matches but very few FF matches. I have very few Y matches but 200 FF matches. Does this make sense?

  • #2
    Absolutely - they're two completely different types of DNA, and you're presumably two completely unrelated people "by blood". Why would you compare your results to his?

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    • #3
      Thanks. I am not comparing my results to his. I was wondering why if you have a rare (or common) Y haplogroup you wouldn't have corresponding matches on FF. But you are right - just because my Y group is rare, the autosomal is not.

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      • #4
        Autosomal (aDNA) doesn't have haplogroups like yDNA and mtDNA. yDNA and mtDNA test only direct paternal and maternal lineages, respectively. aDNA occurs across all family lines. It's possible for a single person to have a lot of matches on aDNA and not a single one on either y or mt, or vice versa. For all three of these, what results you have is to some degree a function of how many people have tested that share it with you, and what database(s) you and they are in. However, there do seem to be some relatively rare y and mt haplogroups, but given the relatively small number of people in the world who have tested, those haplogroups may or may not be as rare as they seem to be.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by JoeDublin View Post
          Thanks. I am not comparing my results to his. I was wondering why if you have a rare (or common) Y haplogroup you wouldn't have corresponding matches on FF. But you are right - just because my Y group is rare, the autosomal is not.
          It may depend on your historical and national background. People from the British Isles tend to have many Y dna matches but fewer FF matches unless they have colonial American histories. Ashkenazi Jews have more FF than Y dna matches.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by JoeDublin View Post
            My father in law has thousands of 12 marker matches but very few FF matches. I have very few Y matches but 200 FF matches. Does this make sense?
            With all due respect, a 12-marker match strains the definition of the term match. My paternal haplogroup is R-L150, updated from R-M269 by Geno 2.0. I have 240 exact 12-marker matches. Not a single one of them shares my surname. These men are natives of such diverse countries as the United States, Saudi Arabia, Germany, Portugal, Lebanon, and Grenada. Except for those in the Americas, these matches have given names and surnames that are indigenous to their homelands. Of the 240 only six remain at 67 markers. Only 1 survives at 111 markers. [His surname is Smith.] It appears that none of my 67-marker matches took the Family Finder test. If they had done so, then they would have been immeasurably more useful in helping me to identify members of my family tree.

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            • #7
              I agree. I have literally tens of thousands of exact 12-marker YDNA matches, and zip beyond that. If it weren't for autosomal testing, I'd be completely stuck, not knowing if its the Kazakh match outlier I should pay attention to or not.

              A guy needs as many ROBUST data points as possible. Some people will just never get there with YDNA, although autosomal DNA is a helluvalot more work. But it seems the only chance to get anywhere for me.

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