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Y DNA and the number against a particular country

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  • Y DNA and the number against a particular country

    Could someone please tell me, when clicking on the map icon in respect of a haplogroup, what the number means in regard to a particular country ? Thank you.

  • #2
    On what page are you seeing a map icon? Perhaps you are referring to the Y-DNA Haplotree, where round "flags" in the "Countries" column are shown for each of the SNPs? If so, I think the numbers there represent the number of participants for each country (you can see the full list for each SNP by clicking on the "+" number, or the three vertical dots to see a country or surname report.

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    • #3
      Thank you, KATM. I would like to come back later with another question.

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      • #4
        1. How likely is it for a DNA testing company to make an error in its Ydna classification?
        2. Where the classification is rare, can it be influenced somehow by autosomal data, although of course it should not?
        3. Does predominance of a classification in one area on current data suggest that it is unique to that region or that it has just not been tested in other areas?
        4. Does the testing in a region take into account the ethnicity of those being tested, e.g. where the population tested is of mixed ancestry?

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        • #5
          I would like to repost my questions, just in case someone can offer any answers. Thank you.
          1. How likely is it for a DNA testing company to make an error in its Ydna classification?
          2. Where the classification is rare, can it be influenced somehow by autosomal data, although of course it should not?
          3. Does predominance of a classification in one area on current data suggest that it is unique to that region or that it has just not been tested in other areas?
          4. Does the testing in a region take into account the ethnicity of those being tested, e.g. where the population tested is of mixed ancestry?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by KMC1 View Post
            I would like to repost my questions, just in case someone can offer any answers. Thank you.
            1. How likely is it for a DNA testing company to make an error in its Ydna classification?
            2. Where the classification is rare, can it be influenced somehow by autosomal data, although of course it should not?
            3. Does predominance of a classification in one area on current data suggest that it is unique to that region or that it has just not been tested in other areas?
            4. Does the testing in a region take into account the ethnicity of those being tested, e.g. where the population tested is of mixed ancestry?
            1. Occasionally there have been reports of some type of glitch in the system to display results, but FTDNA usually has corrected those problems when they are brought to the attention of Customer Support. I believe it would be a very rare occurrence. FTDNA offers a "backbone test" (SNP Assurance Program) if initial Y-DNA testing is unclear and they can't predict a haplogroup.
            2. Since Y-DNA and autosomal DNA are different types of DNA, plus the tests for each use different processes, no - Y-DNA results can't be influenced by atDNA. The YouTube video, "The Ideal Life of a Family Tree DNA Kit" details the testing process for each type of test.
            3. What data? Do you mean for Y-DNA results? I don't understand this question. If for Y-DNA, FTDNA gives a haplogroup and/or subclade of that group, and a Migration Map, but does not predict regions of origin otherwise. Any specific countries or regions you see, such as in FTDNA's Y-DNA Haplotree, or in your Y-DNA Ancestral Origins or Y-DNA Haplogroup Origins have been provided by your matches, not FTDNA.
            4. As far as I know, the reference populations used for autosomal DNA admixture results are based on specific populations that have been in one region for a long time (many generations). The paths and origins of Y-DNA or mtDNA haplogroups are based on scientific research, including use of ancient DNA samples.
            Are you asking these questions because there is a difference in what your Y-DNA results show, compared with what you know of your ancestors? Keep in mind that Y-DNA haplogroups go back many thousands of years, before a genealogical time frame, which FTDNA's Learning Center glossary defines as:
            The genealogical time frame is the most recent one to fifteen generations. Recent genealogical times are the last one to five generations.
            Which Y-DNA test(s) have you done? You may want to read over the following:(all the above are from FTDNA's Learning Center)

            Additionally, Roberta Estes has gathered all her Y-DNA posts into a Y DNA Resources and Repository, which you may find helpful.





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            • #7
              Thank you, KATM for your very detailed reply, which was much appreciated. I would like to discuss this further ‘off-line’, if that is possible? Could you email me on [email protected]? Thank you.

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              • #8
                KMC1, I sent you a private message - check your forum user account.

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