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When you can't contact the surname group administrator

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  • When you can't contact the surname group administrator

    My father ( who's surname will not be shared for his privacy's sake ) is a member of a Y-DNA group for a relatively less common but none the less well researched surname which is said to have originated in Germany. Most people with this surname ( at the group, anyways ) are related and have haplogroup R-M269 or at least a subgroup of it, all except one German who has a variant of the surname, currently lives in Germany and his haplogroup is I-M170. Here's where it gets interesting.
    My father took Y-DNA 37 marker test, and none of the people in the group for his surname are matches to him: not even the one weird German guy. His Y-DNA haplogroup is I-M253, his matches range from Germany, Scandinavia and Eastern Europe all the way to the British Isles, some of his matches have a relatively rare Huguenot French surname, but none of them have a surname even close to his. His group's admin is in poor health right now and hasn't replied to my e-mail, one of his matches with the weird Huguenot surname replied to his e-mail and said to determine whether he had his mother's name or his father's name and then check for someone with their surname ( or one of the several variants of it ) in our family history. Of all the people with our name living in the United States, so far my father isn't related to any of them.
    Any thoughts on this, anyone?

  • #2
    Your genealogical research will help a lot with this situation. Maybe many generations ago an ancestor was given his mother's surname. If however you find that your research should match with those in that surname project, then you got in your hands an NPE case. NPE being non-paternal event or some variation of that. Basically any situation that would explain why an ancestor of yours was not the biological son of his documented father. If this is what you are seeing, you will need others from a similar line from you to take the test.

    This way you can triangulate at which generation this NPE happened. For example if you had a first cousin with the same paternal grandfather take a YDNA test (can even be a Y12), and he matches your father, then you know your grandfather would match them both as well. That would rule out your recent generations after your grandfather. So it helps to find a more distant cousin to rule out even more generations.

    If you had your father take an autosomal DNA test (Family Finder), you can look for potential YDNA test candidates in his autosomal match list if they share the same surname as him or maybe as his YDNA matches. Which reminds me, do any of his YDNA matches also match him through autosomal DNA? If they do not, it would mean that either they have not taken that test or that the connection is a lot more distant.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by The_Contemplator View Post
      Your genealogical research will help a lot with this situation. Maybe many generations ago an ancestor was given his mother's surname. If however you find that your research should match with those in that surname project, then you got in your hands an NPE case. NPE being non-paternal event or some variation of that. Basically any situation that would explain why an ancestor of yours was not the biological son of his documented father. If this is what you are seeing, you will need others from a similar line from you to take the test.

      This way you can triangulate at which generation this NPE happened. For example if you had a first cousin with the same paternal grandfather take a YDNA test (can even be a Y12), and he matches your father, then you know your grandfather would match them both as well. That would rule out your recent generations after your grandfather. So it helps to find a more distant cousin to rule out even more generations.

      If you had your father take an autosomal DNA test (Family Finder), you can look for potential YDNA test candidates in his autosomal match list if they share the same surname as him or maybe as his YDNA matches. Which reminds me, do any of his YDNA matches also match him through autosomal DNA? If they do not, it would mean that either they have not taken that test or that the connection is a lot more distant.
      I haven't checked that yet, but I will, and thank you for the suggestion! Also, thank you for replying to this post!

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      • #4
        Rhonda, if you aren't already familiar with it, you could use the Advanced Matches page to compare matches from more than one type of test, plus X matching. The link to the Advanced Matches page is shown under the buttons/icons in each section of the home page of your account (Family Finder, Y-DNA, mtDNA).

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