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  • Father's Y Haplogroup Different?

    Hello,

    My dad had a 67-marker Y DNA cheek swab test from FTDNA about a dozen years ago. His paternal haplogroup was reported as R-L21. He is now deceased.

    A few months ago, I did 23andme's ancestry test, but it reported my paternal haplogroup as I-L126.

    I am confused by these results as I thought they would match. I have no evidence to believe my dad was not my biological father.

    Was this difference due to test error, mutation, different testing companies or an "extra paternal event", as they euphemistically call it? Or, are these haplogroups related in a way that explains it?

    FTNDA graciously offered me a 12-marker Y test so I could compare it to dad's archived DNA. Hopefully this will shed more light, but I am interested in anyone who can comment on the above.

    Thanks,

    BD

  • #2
    Yes, they should match! It would be very surprising if 23andMe reported such a glaring error to you, but I would wait for FTDNA's 12 marker test of your own DNA before taking any further action.

    If there are additional close relatives who would be willing to test, and if you still don't match your father, autosomal DNA would probably give you the clearest view of the situation. Autosomal DNA testing (such as FTDNA's Family Finder or the 23andMe test) can easily distinguish full siblings from half siblings, full aunt/uncle from half aunt/uncle, and a few other very close relationships, and it can easily distinguish first cousins from unrelated individuals.

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    • #3
      The FTDNA and 23andme tests are different, but closely related men such as a father and son would belong to the same haplogroup no matter the test. The 23andme test is mostly an autosomal DNA test that also tests some YDNA SNPs. The FTDNA STR tests (Y12, Y37, etc) look at YDNA STRs only. These STR tests give you a prediction of a haplogroup such as R-M269. It will be a very safe and generic (old) haplogroup. After that you can take SNP tests. There are different ones including more expensive and more comprehensive options.

      However, you should have the same major haplogroup letter (the R for example). There is also possibilities of errors though. If possible, have a brother of your father or a male cousin who descends from a brother of your father, take a Y12. You all should match up or be very close but with the same generic haplogroup. Though some would suggest going for Y37 to rule out being false matches at the Y12 level. You could upgrade at a later date if desired anyways.

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      • #4
        I have little confidence in any service for Y analysis other than FTDNA, because Y appears to be the red-headed stepchild everywhere but FTDNA. Even the very expensive European tests offered at iGenea only treat Y analysis as a sideline, because it is simply not as marketable to a gullible public on TV. I was not aware that 23andme offered haplo prediction for men, so wait for FTDNA analysis and take The Contemplator's advice. At least at FTDNA, you can use expand Y12 later. 23andme has no interest in your Y analysis.
        Last edited by clintonslayton76; 28th September 2018, 06:18 PM. Reason: spell check

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        • #5
          23andMe's results does include SNP testing for both paternal and maternal Haplogroups. Their paternal Haplogroup will be deeper than the predicted paternal Haplogroup from FTDNA.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Jim Barrett View Post
            23andMe's results does include SNP testing for both paternal and maternal Haplogroups. Their paternal Haplogroup will be deeper than the predicted paternal Haplogroup from FTDNA.
            That's true, but I-L126 does not appear to be a subclade of R-L21?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Germanica View Post
              That's true, but I-L126 does not appear to be a subclade of R-L21?
              You are correct. A R-L21 man will not have an I-L126 son. The father in question must have done some SNP testing to be shown as R-L21. BD, the OP, will not be predicted to be R-L21. IF BD's predicted Haplogroup doesn't come back as R-something he'll know the person he believes to be his father isn't. I hope his Y-DNA results comes back soon.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Jim Barrett View Post

                You are correct. A R-L21 man will not have an I-L126 son. The father in question must have done some SNP testing to be shown as R-L21. BD, the OP, will not be predicted to be R-L21. IF BD's predicted Haplogroup doesn't come back as R-something he'll know the person he believes to be his father isn't. I hope his Y-DNA results comes back soon.
                This is a fairly glaring discrepancy from 23andMe and FTDNA in terms of predicting a haplogroup (especially with R-L21 and I-L126) if it turns out to just be an error and not something else at play.

                I hope OP gets his results soon.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by spruithean View Post
                  This is a fairly glaring discrepancy from 23andMe and FTDNA in terms of predicting a haplogroup (especially with R-L21 and I-L126) if it turns out to just be an error and not something else at play. I hope OP gets his results soon.
                  The value from 23andMe is based on SNP testing and is NOT a prediction.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Jim Barrett View Post

                    The value from 23andMe is based on SNP testing and is NOT a prediction.
                    I am aware of that.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by spruithean View Post
                      I am aware of that.
                      Good. I wanted everyone to be aware of it.

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                      • #12
                        I am the OP. Thanks to everyone with replies above.

                        Sadly, there was no test error with my 23andme test. I ordered a 12 marker kit from FTDNA and compared it to my dad's archived test at FTNDA. We only match on a few of the 12 markers and were indeed in different haplogroups. He is dead now and died thinking I was his biological son. My mother revealed the sad truth to me when the results came in -- my father was cuckolded. She lied to both of us. I am 46 -- my prior life was a sham.

                        This is desperate, but I am assuming if my dad's first 12 Y markers were:
                        13 24 14 11 11-13 12 12 11 13 13 29

                        ...and mine were:

                        15 24 15 11 15-16 11 13 13 13 12 30

                        ...it means we were not related, correct?

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                        • #13
                          It means you were not genetically related, but he was still family!

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                          • #14
                            Not a close male line only relative, only a family finder test would show if you are related on other lines at all. It is still a nature vs. nurture thing though. The same as adoptees and step children who just say this is my dad or mom when the biological tie is not there. Family members that raise and care for you are still family, because they helped to shape you into the person you are by giving you the experiences that you have had. DNA shapes the way you look, as long as there haven't been disfiguring accidents, and predisposition towards some things including health. Life experiences can override or modify some genetic predispositions. Would your mom having an abortion, putting you up for adoption, or getting a divorce and raising you as a single mom have been any better? Without DNA testing, your mom could have waited to tell you on her death bed. You are upset about the situation being what it is, which is quite understandable. You can still say that your dad is your dad, since he is the only dad you have ever known. Where you go from here is what you make of your life, you can let this define you or not. Use resources available: family, friends, confidants, and/or professionals, as needed to help you get through this difficult time. Nobody knows just the right thing to say and there isn't a Hallmark card for it.

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                            • #15
                              I was not aware that 23andme had a "deeper" haplogroup analysis than FTDNA because of SNP, I appreciate knowing that and thank Mr Barrett for pointing that out. I was accustomed to thinking of 23andme as the more heavily oriented towards medical results (from their previous advertising) than genetic genealogy.

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