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  • R-M222 at 23 and Me.

    Back in April I did a 67 marker test. Still waiting for results. I also tested at 23 and me and I was assigned to R-M222. My question is, What are the chances of it being that here? I have seen several posts where everyone is lumped into M269 here and told they will need to test more. Thanks

  • #2
    Originally posted by Txhsker View Post
    Back in April I did a 67 marker test. Still waiting for results. I also tested at 23 and me and I was assigned to R-M222. My question is, What are the chances of it being that here? I have seen several posts where everyone is lumped into M269 here and told they will need to test more. Thanks
    23andMe tested your SNPs, so you are R-M222 or on one of the further branches. Y-DNA67 is testing STRs, so SNPs can only be guessed
    (predicted).

    Due to the way STRs change their values, it is not (and it will not) be possible to predict your SNPs more accurately than R-M269 based on 67 markers.

    When testing STRs you can easily compare yourself to your recent relatives.

    When testing SNPs, like R-M222, you can gain some information about your ancient ancestry thousands of years ago.

    W. (Mr.)

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    • #3
      Thank you for the info. I am an adoptee searching for my bio father. I have hopes of getting a surname, that is why I am testing.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by dna View Post
        [----] Due to the way STRs change their values, it is not (and it will not) be possible to predict your SNPs more accurately than R-M269 based on 67 markers. [----]
        I was referring to a general case. When additional information is available, sometimes it is possible to refine the haplogroup prediction.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by dna View Post
          23andMe tested your SNPs, so you are R-M222 or on one of the further branches. Y-DNA67 is testing STRs, so SNPs can only be guessed
          (predicted).

          Due to the way STRs change their values, it is not (and it will not) be possible to predict your SNPs more accurately than R-M269 based on 67 markers.

          When testing STRs you can easily compare yourself to your recent relatives.

          When testing SNPs, like R-M222, you can gain some information about your ancient ancestry thousands of years ago.

          W. (Mr.)
          If I test on 23&me and my haplogroup is refined to one more recent one than my current 13,000 year old R-M269 on that is assigned on FTDNA will FTDNA accept the 23&me data and change my haplogroup? I am betting not since they want to sell Big Y?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by LarryBurford View Post
            If I test on 23&me and my haplogroup is refined to one more recent one than my current 13,000 year old R-M269 on that is assigned on FTDNA will FTDNA accept the 23&me data and change my haplogroup? I am betting not since they want to sell Big Y?
            As far I understand FTDNA will not transfer your SNPs from 23andMe. However, people use that knowledge to order tests at FTDNA to further refine their haplogroup.

            For example, the original poster would know that M222 panel is for him.

            W. (Mr.)

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            • #7
              Originally posted by LarryBurford View Post
              If I test on 23&me and my haplogroup is refined to one more recent one than my current 13,000 year old R-M269 on that is assigned on FTDNA will FTDNA accept the 23&me data and change my haplogroup? I am betting not since they want to sell Big Y?
              FTDNA does accept the autosomal results from a test at Ancesetry.com or a test using the v3 testing chip at 23andMe. However, they disregard any yDNA or mtDNA results in the raw data file.

              They only consider the autosomal results and find matches for you in the Family Finder database. That's their business model, as you alluded to. They offer deeper testing for yDNA and mtDNA than 23andMe does, so won't count yDNA and mtDNA results from another company.

              However, if you were to test at 23andMe, you would almost certainly (except in a few cases where the person is actually R-M269 or close to it) get a deeper yDNA haplogroup/subclade than FTDNA has given you. Once you have that deeper assignment, you can request to join the appropriate haplogroup project at FTDNA, even though FTDNA still will only predict you as R-M269. Haplogroup projects are run by volunteer administrators, not FTDNA, and they're generally happy to add new members of their haplogroup to the project.

              Many haplogroup projects will accept a 23andMe haplogroup assignment. In the R1b-U106 Project, all we ask is that the person provide a screenshot of the haplogroup assignment that 23andMe has given him. Once the person's in the project, we can then advise him on what further SNP testing he might want to do. We do advise those who can afford to to order the Big Y test, but are willing to advise others on individual SNP testing, if that's their choice.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Txhsker View Post
                Thank you for the info. I am an adoptee searching for my bio father. I have hopes of getting a surname, that is why I am testing.
                Looking at your close matches at 67 markers (64/67 or closer) will give you much better clues about the surname of your birth father than confirming your haplogroup. Haplogroups like M222 are over 1,000 years old, so matching someone in haplogroup isn't necessarily going to connect you to someone with the surname of your birth father. But a close match at 67 markers is more likely to be useful in your search.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Txhsker View Post
                  Thank you for the info. I am an adoptee searching for my bio father. I have hopes of getting a surname, that is why I am testing.
                  When I tested my dad on the Y-67 test he had 4 or 5 close matches at the 67 level and all of them had the last name Willis not Burford. The people he matched had their oldest know male Willis ancestors in the mid to late 1700's. I found a Burford cousin that was a 7th cousin and had him tested. Our most recent common ancestor with this Burford man was Daniel Burford born in 1684 in Virginia. He and my dad matched with a genetic distance of 3 at Y-67.

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                  • #10
                    Thank you to everyone who replied to this post. Lots of good advice and it is much appreciated.

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                    • #11
                      Just an update to my original post. I finally got the results of my 67 marker test and had a match of 67/67 with a person whose surname was kind of what I thought I might find. Most of my other matches have done some snp testing as they are R-M222 which is what I tested out as at 23 and me. I went ahead and ordered the M222 panel to confirm.

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