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  • snp question

    I have (3) snps that were discovered in Big Y testing, in which my 9th cousin also has. These (3) snps are in sequence with one another, their positions are 8675561, 8675562, 8675563. I am wondering if this is an example of a "Haplotype Block", snps that are close enough to one another to be inherited together ultimately indicating degrees of common ancestry. These (3) snps have been given "BY" names, but that is not important to know, as their adjacent positions seem more significant. I looked at all of my other "BY" named snps and none of them are in sequence like these three.

    Best regards, Doug

  • #2
    Answering my own question

    Originally posted by DWFlineage View Post
    I have (3) snps that were discovered in Big Y testing, in which my 9th cousin also has. These (3) snps are in sequence with one another, their positions are 8675561, 8675562, 8675563. I am wondering if this is an example of a "Haplotype Block", snps that are close enough to one another to be inherited together ultimately indicating degrees of common ancestry. These (3) snps have been given "BY" names, but that is not important to know, as their adjacent positions seem more significant. I looked at all of my other "BY" named snps and none of them are in sequence like these three.

    Best regards, Doug
    I asked a project person and this is what this is:

    "This is what is known as an MNP, or multi-nucleotide polymorphism. In this case, it should really be styled as a single mutation, 8675561 (TTA->AAT). All Y-chromosome mutations are inherited father to son, indicating common ancestry.

    MNPs aren't very well researched in terms of their frequency. We don't know very much about how often they occur, what their stability is, or even whether they can occur piece-wise in successive generations. We do know that they are relatively rare."

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