Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

no exact matches with the family assumed to be ours past 5th gen

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Okay, that makes sense. I'll try to talk more family members into getting tested.

    Comment


    • #17
      I don't know if anyone mentioned this in the current thread, but the history of surnames even in England is complicated. It may be that multiple (and genetically unrelated) families ended up with the surname Austin, at some point in the distant past. So, when you encounter Austin families whose Y DNA is way, way different from your father's, you can probably rule out a connection. What you're really looking for, are Austins that DO match your family. Some of the discussion here has to do with how close a match needs to be in order to be sure it really is a meaningful one, and that's quite difficult to answer in many cases, because the data are not conclusive. The best test available for that purpose would be the Big Y, for the reason that it places the Y DNA on a distinct branch of the Y haplotree, where you can easily see whether your family's Y DNA is plausibly connected with that of any other Austin family that has been tested with something resembling Big Y. Even if there are as yet no Austins who are on your particular twig of the Y haplotree, at least that information would tell you which Austins you are NOT directly related to! It has to be said, too, that a lot of this depends on waiting patiently until just the right person happens to take the test!

      Comment


      • #18
        You eventually are going to get to Big Y, so you might as well go ahead and go for it.

        Comment


        • #19
          Our Austins were from Ireland. The dna does seem to have a lot of Irish in it, which matches up with the family stories. It is the genetic signature inherited from a 5th century Irish warlord, but it doesn't match the line it's supposed to. I've talked this over with several people and am still trying to figure out what the most logical explanation is. A fellow researcher suggested today that the times surrounding the American Revolution were pretty lawless and there were roving bands of "bad men." A lot of things happened that families didn't talk about.

          There appear to be no Austins in the familytreedna database which match us. I do want to eventually upgrade to the Big Y, but think I'll wait and see what kind of results we get from the 111 marker first.

          Comment


          • #20
            But yes, the surname Austin sprang up in various parts of the British Isles around the same time, because it was originally a first name. There are completely different strains from England, Scotland, and Ireland, at least.

            Comment


            • #21
              Okay, a dna test done by a female cousin in this line is linking us to at least one of the parents of the man who doesn't match, which would imply that at least his mother was biologically related. That seems to knock down the possibility of adoption, unless his mother adopted a relative.

              Comment


              • #22
                But actually, it looks like no one who's matched us on YDNA besides our known distant cousin is related within the last 99 generations. :/
                Last edited by angelaka; 15th February 2020, 03:49 PM.

                Comment


                • #23
                  So all of these Austin cousins match each other on the Y-DNA or am I missing something? Small genetic distances are to be expected between distant and not so distant relatives, it's a luck of the draw. There is a branch of my male-line which has a distinguishing mutation that helps to differentiate them from the other lineages with the same common ancestor.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    In the Austin project, descendants of the family we're supposed to be related to match each other on YDNA, but the line of one of the sons (from which my father and another cousin are descended) doesn't match up with the others. Here in the familytreedna site, none of our matches besides the one cousin are projected to be related to us within 99 generations. A female descendant of the man whose YDNA doesn't match has been shown to be related to the family, so I'm assuming that's through the maternal DNA.

                    The problem with it possibly being a mutation is that there are 3 markers that are different, and one of them is a couple of steps off. The total mutations would be 4. I'm not sure how likely that is.
                    Last edited by angelaka; 18th February 2020, 12:00 PM.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X