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Understanding why/how matches change after upgrading from Y-37 to Y-111

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  • Understanding why/how matches change after upgrading from Y-37 to Y-111

    Sorry, this is probably a dumb newbie question, but I would like to understand this better.

    I tested at the Y-37 level and was matched to another person who had tested at the Y-111 level with an estimated genetic distance of 1.

    I then upgraded to Y-111 in the hope of confirming a close relationship to that other person. But the estimated genetic distance has now gone out to 4.

    I assume this means that out Y-DNA profile is less similar than previously appeared to be the case, because of differences found on the additional markers tested?

    Another person with whom I matched more closely still at the Y-37 level (genetic distance 0), is not listed at the Y-111 level, but I assume that would be because that person has only done a Y-37 test?

    What is the best way forward for me? Would it be to persuade the person with whom I matched at genetic distance 0 at the Y-37 level to do a Y-111 test?

    I am also puzzled by the suggested genetic distance 0 match, because, judging from the GEDCOMs, there cannot possibly be a common male ancestor within the last 200 years - one family being in Wales, the other in the US. Any comments?

    Thanks for any clarification anyone can offer.

    Pete








  • #2
    See https://www.familytreedna.com/learn/...s-interpreted/ and https://www.familytreedna.com/learn/y-dna-testing/y-str/two-men-share-surname-genetic-distance-37-y-chromosome-str-markers-interpreted/

    Your Y-DNA 111 match list only shows others who have tested 111 markers.

    In your last question you don't tell us how many markers you are talking about. We test more and more markers to get rid of false markers. My wife's cousin has over 1,000 12 marker matches, but zero 37 marker matches. Also remember Y-DNA finds matches from over 200 years and trees can be wrong. Events we don't know about may have happened and documented records may be wrong.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Forefathers View Post

      I am also puzzled by the suggested genetic distance 0 match, because, judging from the GEDCOMs, there cannot possibly be a common male ancestor within the last 200 years - one family being in Wales, the other in the US. Any comments?

      Thanks for any clarification anyone can offer.

      Pete
      DNA trumps paper. Maybe you had a sailor in your patrilineal line, or a British soldier who fought against the rebelling American colonists.

      I am a bit curious about your haplogroup assignment.

      Jack

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