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  • Y111

    Newbie here
    I have a dna natch to me that is male and has done a Y111 test. I am female does that mean this meatch is on my paternal line or not ?
    thanks

  • #2
    It does not mean he is a paternal match.
    Y-DNA is used for patrilineal matches, not just paternal, and is a separate test to autosmal DNA (Family Finder).
    As a female, you do not have Y-DNA.
    If you wanted to test patrilineal matches, you can have your father, a brother, father's brother, etc, tested for Y-DNA.

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    • #3
      On the family finder matching list, that is "additional information" that if you have done the relevant tests(or somebody else you know has done those tests), you can use that information to try to figure out how they relate.

      But a FamilyFinder test is autosomal(atDNA). It is letting you know you have an autosomal match who also has done Y-DNA testing, but that doesn't mean you are a Y-DNA match with them. Given that you are evidently female, the probability of you having anybody match you on a Y-DNA test is astronomically bad, as you don't have any to match with.

      If you have a brother, living father/grandfather, uncles, or even cousins related to you on their male (only) line, you can Y-DNA test them to see if they match that person who has Y111 tested. But in your particular case, I might verify your male relative also is an atDNA match with that person as well first.

      But it should also be noted that an autosomal match can be anywhere on your family tree. Y-DNA matches will only match on their respective male-only lines. Given the cost of good quality Y-DNA tests(for genealogical use), you might want to do some further research before jumping straight to doing Y-DNA tests on random male relatives. While the information from those tests may be useful in some form, testing them (at random) may not be helpful for the specific thing you were trying to get an answer to.

      So for example, the autosomal match in question might be on your mother side, in which case Y-DNA testing a brother, your father, or any of your father's relatives isn't likely to be helpful. You would need to fine a male relative on your mother's side, and try to determine if their relationship with the person is maternal or paternal too. Obviously just testing them is easier, but as I said, that can get to be expensive.
      Last edited by bartarl260; 3 April 2019, 02:58 AM.

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