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y-dna 37 no match founds

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  • lgmayka
    replied
    Originally posted by Ruthen View Post
    Therefore, I decided that I will take it Y-Big, I hope that this will help at least somehow.
    If you haven't already ordered the Big Y, this coupon should reduce the price down to $425:
    RAMBigY2017

    Leave a comment:


  • Ruthen
    replied
    Originally posted by KATM View Post
    Have you considered taking the Family Finder test? Although it reflects ancestry and matches from both your maternal and paternal sides, you may have a match with someone from the great-grandfather's relatives, who may be able to provide the surname.

    The myOrigins tool could indicate a population group for the great-grandfather, as well. You could also upload your raw Family Finder file to GEDmatch.com, to see more matches, and try the other tools there for ethnicity predictions.

    Also, I believe that many Swedes are interested in genetic genealogy, and have taken autosomal DNA testing for that purpose. I don't know if other Scandinavian countries, or Germans, have done the same.
    Thank you for information. But, I also passed FF and uploaded my database to gedmatch.com. But nowhere are there any close relatives, unfortunately. Therefore, I decided that I will take it Y-Big, I hope that this will help at least somehow.

    Leave a comment:


  • KATM
    replied
    You also may want to join the N1C1 Y-DNA Project. Perhaps they can help you if you are considering any Y-DNA SNP testing, to refine your haplogroup further. It says on that page (I have bolded one sentence):
    SNP L550+ is typical for South-Baltic and Scandinavian II branches of haplogroup N1c1 L550.
    The mutations that define the subclade N1c1 are M178 and P298. This is the most frequent subclade of haplogroup N M231.
    Haplogroup N1c1 is approximately 10 000 years old and has higher average frequency in Northern Europe than in Siberia, reaching frequencies of approximately 60% among finns and approximately 40% among latvians and lithuanians. N1c1 haplogroup has Southern Siberian origin, but it's very ancient migration to Europe (mostly around the Baltic Sea) and Volga region from Siberia and the Urals.
    Also check the Haplogroup N1c page at Eupedia, and there is some information on the Wikipedia page for Haplogroup N-M231.

    There may be a sale on some Y-DNA tests soon, for the Father's Day holiday, so keep an eye out for that if you are interested.
    Last edited by KATM; 1 June 2017, 03:32 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • KATM
    replied
    Have you considered taking the Family Finder test? Although it reflects ancestry and matches from both your maternal and paternal sides, you may have a match with someone from the great-grandfather's relatives, who may be able to provide the surname.

    The myOrigins tool could indicate a population group for the great-grandfather, as well. You could also upload your raw Family Finder file to GEDmatch.com, to see more matches, and try the other tools there for ethnicity predictions.

    Also, I believe that many Swedes are interested in genetic genealogy, and have taken autosomal DNA testing for that purpose. I don't know if other Scandinavian countries, or Germans, have done the same.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ruthen
    replied
    I have an ambiguous situation. My grandfather's mother was exiled to Kolyma camp, where my grandfather was born in 1944. My father had long suspected that my grandfather's father was not native to us, and most likely my grandfather's mother was exiled to Kolyma for relations with a German or Scandinavian man, because we are completely different from the outside with their relatives, we wear someone else's surname and do not know their true family tree. We just want to know who we are and to return our real name. So I'm a little bit disappointed..
    Last edited by Ruthen; 1 June 2017, 02:38 PM.

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  • MoberlyDrake
    replied
    My father is Italian and he has no matches at either 25 or 37 markers. I believe that few Italians have tested. Most people who test are from America and the UK. I believe this is why my father has no matches, and depending on your country, you may have the same problem.

    Leave a comment:


  • John McCoy
    replied
    Finding no matches can be helpful: this result indicates that you are not closely related to any of the people who have already taken this test, including those who have the same family name. However, the reason for the lack of matches may simply be that the Y chromosome relatives whom you hope to find have not taken the test yet. If any of them will take the test in the future, they will see you as a match and will probably contact you.

    The Big-Y test will show your position very exactly in the Y "haplotree". For me, this was useful. I discovered that I am all alone at the end of a little branch of the "haplotree", and therefore not related within the past several centuries through the Y chromosome to anyone who has taken the Big-Y test. In effect, the test gives me permission to pay no attention to everyone else in the database!

    Leave a comment:


  • Ruthen
    started a topic y-dna 37 no match founds

    y-dna 37 no match founds

    Greetings to all.

    I apologize for your English in advance. Situation is as follows.

    I handed over 37 markers. For 12 markers - Norway, Finland, Turkey.

    Haplogroup n-m231.

    But, there is not a single match for 25 and 37 markers. Also there are no coincidences.

    Can this be and is there any sense in taking Y-67/Y-BIG?

    Thanks.
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