Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

number of Y67 matches

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • number of Y67 matches

    I have about a dozen kits on FTDNA. I have a good many of them tested to Y67. Most kits have several matches at this level and a couple do not have any. However I have one ( tested my mothers brother) who has 205 Y67 matches. His last name is Stewart and his closest matches are Stewart's but then there are dozens of other surnames. Does this mean he had a male ancestor that had a LOT of children with different women hundreds of years ago?

  • #2
    It can mean that. But it can also mean that there weren't many changes in the STRs for this paternal line. Or that there was a convergence in STR values with other paternal lines. Meaning some matches can be false matches that appear to be more closely related than they really are.

    In such cases, doing some SNP testing can help. Some will belong to one SNP branch and others to a different one. The ones in a different one are then the false matches. If SNP testing is of interest, seek out a haplogroup project admin for that kit. They might advice on which SNPs to test for. Or just go for Big Y.

    Comment


    • #3
      "Does this mean he had a male ancestor that had a LOT of children with different women hundreds of years ago?"

      The number of wives and partners has nothing to do with YDNA. You are still dealing with a single YDNA male lineage.

      My feeling (and I am no scholar on Scottish surnames or genealogy) is that your YDNA matches go back to a common ancestor prior to the advent of surnames.

      I have also seen issues like this connected to Western Atlantic Modal Haplotype and you might want to pursue that perspective.

      Comment


      • #4
        "Does this mean he had a male ancestor that had a LOT of children with different women hundreds of years ago?"

        The number of wives and partners has nothing to do with YDNA.

        My feeling (and I am no scholar on Scottish surnames or genealogy) is that your YDNA matches go back to a common ancestor prior to the advent of surnames.

        I have also seen issues like this (hundreds of Y67 matches) connected to Western Atlantic Modal Haplotype and you might want to pursue that perspective.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by LarryBurford View Post
          I have one (tested my mothers brother) who has 205 Y67 matches. His last name is Stewart and his closest matches are Stewart's but then there are dozens of other surnames.
          How many GD's are the matches?

          The closest matches could be descendants of a Stewart from let's say 1500.

          The dozens of other names (not so close) could be from men living before 1000.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Yde View Post
            How many GD's are the matches?

            The closest matches could be descendants of a Stewart from let's say 1500.

            The dozens of other names (not so close) could be from men living before 1000.
            He has 14 matches that are between 1 and 4 GD. The rest are 5,6 or 7 genetic distance. He has a Stewart with GD of 1, two Stewart's with a GD of 2 and another Stewart with a GD of 4. He has several other Stewart's that have only tested to Y37. At GD of 3 he has 3 surnames other than Stewart. At a GD of 4 he has 8 additional surnames names other that Stewart. At GD of 5,6, and 7 there are dozens of different surnames.

            I would think an ancestor with a lot of wives could make a big difference in how many Y matches you have. Lets say hypothetically he had 100 wives and had sons with all of them. Every one of those males would pass on his Y dna.

            Comment


            • #7
              .


              Originally posted by LarryBurford View Post
              At GD of 5,6, and 7 there are dozens of different surnames.

              I would think an ancestor with a lot of wives could make a big difference in how many Y matches you have. Lets say hypothetically he had 100 wives and had sons with all of them. Every one of those males would pass on his Y dna.
              Yes, 100 wives would likely produce lots of sons, but not dozens of different surnames. Unless this MRCA predates the advent of Scottish surnames.

              Comment


              • #8
                To get lots of surnames, you need to look for a man who had lots of sons by other men's wives or unmarried women!

                Joking aside, here are some names associated with Clan Stewart, but you would have to read a good history of the clan to determine how many of them might be related by blood (DNA):

                Septs of Clan Stewart:

                Stewart: Boyd, Denniston, France, Francis, Lennox, Lisle, Lombard, Lyle, Mentieth, Moodie, Stuart, Young.

                Stewart of Atholl: Conacher, Crookshank(s), Cruickshank(s), Duilach, Garrow, Gray, Larnach, MacGarrow, MacGlashan

                Stewart of Appin: Carmichael, Clay, Combich, Combie, Conlay, Donlevy, Leay, Levac, Livingston(e), Lorne, MacColl, MacCombe, McCombich, MacDonLeavy, MacLeay, MacLew, MacMichael, MacNairn, MacNucator, MacRob, Mitchell, Mitchelson, Robb, Walker

                Stuart of Bute: Bannatyne, Caw, Fullerton, Glass, Hunter, Jamieson/Jamison/Jameson/Jimerson, Lewis, Loy, MacCamie, MacCaw, MacCloy, MacKirdie/McCurdie/McCurdy/McKirdie/McKirdy, MacElheran, MacKerron, MacLewis, MacLoy, MacMunn, MacMurtrie, Malloy, Milloy, Munn, Neilson, Sharpe, Sharp

                Stewart of Galloway: Carmichael, MacMichael

                Comment

                Working...
                X