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37 to 67 upgrade. Is it worth it?

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  • 37 to 67 upgrade. Is it worth it?

    The reason I'm asking is:
    I got 193 matches at 12 markers.
    I got 54 matches at 25 markers.
    I got 0 matches at 37 markers.

    So I suppose at 67 markers I will also have 0 matches, right?

    On the other hand: I recently found a match on ysearch with someone who had a GD of 6 at 37 markers and his most distant parental ancestor was also from the same area as mine. He was my best score at ysearch. But at FTDNA he only shows up in the 12 markers test.
    This person was tested with 67 markers, so i wonder if it might be worthwhile to compare with 67 markers as well?

  • #2
    Originally posted by Hneel View Post
    I got 0 matches at 37 markers.

    So I suppose at 67 markers I will also have 0 matches, right?
    Not necessarily. FTDNA's matching limit at 37 markers is 4, but at 67 markers, 7. Thus, someone's genetic distance from you may be 5 at 37 markers but 6 at 67 markers; that person will show up as a 67-marker match but not a 37-marker match.

    I have even seen the most extreme case: My cousin has a 67-marker match at distance 7 who at 37 markers is also distance 7. In other words, they appeared to be far apart at 37 markers, but then exactly matched on the next 30 markers.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Hneel View Post
      The reason I'm asking is:
      I got 193 matches at 12 markers.
      I got 54 matches at 25 markers.
      I got 0 matches at 37 markers.

      So I suppose at 67 markers I will also have 0 matches, right?

      On the other hand: I recently found a match on ysearch with someone who had a GD of 6 at 37 markers and his most distant parental ancestor was also from the same area as mine. He was my best score at ysearch. But at FTDNA he only shows up in the 12 markers test.
      This person was tested with 67 markers, so i wonder if it might be worthwhile to compare with 67 markers as well?

      A 67 marker test is ideal and one can learn a lot from it. There is a sale on at present.

      Comment


      • #4
        Is it worth upgrading from 37-67 markers?

        Hneel, are you in a rare haplogroup. If so then you'll have to play the waiting game, and it'll be worth it to have the additional markers when a better match comes along.

        If you're not in a rare group, and maybe even if you are, do you know if there is any recLOH mutations in your results? They can make close matches appear much farther away than they should be. This happened to me.

        Comment


        • #5
          I have a 60/67 and he is 30/37 I got the 67 before I knew about the 37 though!

          In fact we are also 21/25
          13 24 14 11 11 14 12 12 12 13 13 29 16 9 10 11 11 27 15 19 29 15 15 16 18

          13 24 14 11 11 14 12 12 12 12 13 28 16 9 10 11 11 27 15 19 27 15 15 16 17

          We are both U152+ S20550+
          Solothurn
          FTDNA Customer
          Last edited by Solothurn; 6 September 2014, 01:20 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Solothurn View Post
            I have a 60/67 and he is 30/37 I got the 67 before I knew about the 37 though!

            In fact we are also 21/25
            13 24 14 11 11 14 12 12 12 13 13 29 16 9 10 11 11 27 15 19 29 15 15 16 18

            13 24 14 11 11 14 12 12 12 12 13 28 16 9 10 11 11 27 15 19 27 15 15 16 17

            We are both U152+ S20550+
            If you go to ysearch and use your first 12 markers plus 492=12 you may find more men in your subgroup. When you do find them you can check out the rest of their markers and see where they match. That will help you define the group.

            Comment


            • #7
              Well, I decided to add the 67 marker test.
              I noticed that on ysearch it was easier to get results. At 37 markers I found someone who had a GD of only 6. (Most were 10+). He was even from roughly the same geographical area as my ancestor.
              On FTDNA this same person only showed up in the 12 marker test. And he didn't stand out in any way. He was just one of the many.
              Also, with 67 markers I hope it might be easier to predict a subclade.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by John View Post
                Hneel, are you in a rare haplogroup. If so then you'll have to play the waiting game, and it'll be worth it to have the additional markers when a better match comes along.

                If you're not in a rare group, and maybe even if you are, do you know if there is any recLOH mutations in your results? They can make close matches appear much farther away than they should be. This happened to me.
                I've been wondering about the mutations too. I've heard that getting children at higher ages increases the chance of mutations. My most distant parental ancestor is 10 generations away. And 4 of those ancestors were 40+ fathers. I know that my most distant ancestor had 3 sons. All of those 3 branches have living (paternal line) offspring to this day. I wonder how much their y dna differs from mine. Perhaps I should ask one of them to take a test too.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Hneel View Post
                  Well, I decided to add the 67 marker test.
                  I noticed that on ysearch it was easier to get results. At 37 markers I found someone who had a GD of only 6. (Most were 10+). He was even from roughly the same geographical area as my ancestor.
                  On FTDNA this same person only showed up in the 12 marker test. And he didn't stand out in any way. He was just one of the many.
                  Also, with 67 markers I hope it might be easier to predict a subclade.
                  A lot of testers who match at 57 out of 67 have the same terminal SNP. If you look at the 67 marker modal that you are closest to it will also help you find your subgroup.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks 1798

                    I will give this a go. I also have a rare DYS511=9 in my subgroup, so I will include that

                    Originally posted by 1798 View Post
                    If you go to ysearch and use your first 12 markers plus 492=12 you may find more men in your subgroup. When you do find them you can check out the rest of their markers and see where they match. That will help you define the group.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I did the 14 markers and only one came up. I have emailed him but I wouldn't blame him if he declined. not everybody is a test junky like me

                      Originally posted by 1798 View Post
                      If you go to ysearch and use your first 12 markers plus 492=12 you may find more men in your subgroup. When you do find them you can check out the rest of their markers and see where they match. That will help you define the group.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Solothurn View Post
                        I did the 14 markers and only one came up. I have emailed him but I wouldn't blame him if he declined. not everybody is a test junky like me
                        You can use more than 14 markers or any markers that you see fit. Some of the men with the same terminal SNP as mine are a GD of 30 but they have specific markers within the 67 that identify the group. Once you find the markers then it is so simple.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          A few markers that are in your group which will help are 458=16, 447=27, YCAIIb+22, 511+9 and 714=24 which you probably know already.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Hneel View Post
                            I've been wondering about the mutations too. I've heard that getting children at higher ages increases the chance of mutations. My most distant parental ancestor is 10 generations away. And 4 of those ancestors were 40+ fathers. I know that my most distant ancestor had 3 sons. All of those 3 branches have living (paternal line) offspring to this day. I wonder how much their y dna differs from mine. Perhaps I should ask one of them to take a test too.
                            My half-brother was born when our father was 24 and I was born when he was 40. My brother and I are separated by 2 markers at 37 markers and he has about 3 times as many matches as I do at 12 markers. So, I would say this leads credence to what you said.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Hneel View Post
                              I've been wondering about the mutations too. I've heard that getting children at higher ages increases the chance of mutations. My most distant parental ancestor is 10 generations away. And 4 of those ancestors were 40+ fathers. I know that my most distant ancestor had 3 sons. All of those 3 branches have living (paternal line) offspring to this day. I wonder how much their y dna differs from mine. Perhaps I should ask one of them to take a test too.
                              There is no need to. It will be money wasted. If you have money to spare spend it on YSNP tests. We are all related more closely by SNPs than haplotypes.
                              I or anyone can use their haplotype as modal for family and cousins. If you look at the M222 group and see how close they all are to the modal haplotype you will understand.They are very distant cousins.

                              Comment

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