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Different surnames on Y-67

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  • Different surnames on Y-67

    My maternal uncle has 11 matches on his Y-67 test, but all of them have different surnames. None match his surname, and none of them match each other. His ancestry is Hungarian/Slavic; his matches' names and MDKOs do seem to be from that part of the world, including Russia.
    In comparison, my father's Y-67 has a similar number of matches and all but 2 share his surname. Those two have proven NPEs which tie them to our family. My father is of British Isles ancestry.
    Is my maternal uncle's result a reflection of eastern Europe's centuries of turmoil? Was it common for men there to change their surnames?

  • #2
    Surnames were adopted and stabilized much later in Eastern Europe than in the British Isles, particularly:

    - Among the Jewish community, who generally used patronymics (e.g., Simon bar Jonah) as long as the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth survived. Only after surrounding empires gobbled up the Commonwealth (in the late 18th century) did Jews have to adopt surnames.

    - Among the serfs, whose status was near the level of plantation slavery, surnames were only slowly considered necessary; and because so many serfs were only borderline-literate, and records were often kept in Latin, surname spellings often changed from one generation to the next.

    Wikipedia on serfdom in Russia:
    ---
    Author David P. Forsythe wrote: "In 1649 up to three-quarters of Muscovy's peasants, or 13 to 14 million people, were serfs whose material lives were barely distinguishable from slaves. Perhaps another 1.5 million were formally enslaved, with Russian slaves serving Russian masters." Russia's more than 23 million privately held serfs were freed from their lords by an edict of Alexander II in 1861. State-owned serfs were emancipated in 1866.
    ---

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    • #3
      Thanks! That's very interesting, and it does help explain the surname difference.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by PennyToo View Post
        My maternal uncle has 11 matches on his Y-67 test, but all of them have different surnames. None match his surname, and none of them match each other. His ancestry is Hungarian/Slavic; his matches' names and MDKOs do seem to be from that part of the world, including Russia.
        In comparison, my father's Y-67 has a similar number of matches and all but 2 share his surname. Those two have proven NPEs which tie them to our family. My father is of British Isles ancestry.
        Is my maternal uncle's result a reflection of eastern Europe's centuries of turmoil? Was it common for men there to change their surnames?
        Why do you think that men who match at 67 markers should have the same surnames? Some of the men who took the FGC test have 400 markers.So I would like to know are two men who are a close match at 67 markers still a close match at 400?

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