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  • Stevo
    replied
    Originally posted by 1798 View Post
    This map shows the "Germanic" tribes coming from Scandinavia. Scandinavia is not the origin place of U106. Get your facts right and stop fantasizing.
    Please respond with actual arguments instead of pointless blather and extreme language (e.g., "stop fantasizing").

    That map shows the expansion of Germanic-speaking peoples. The red zone of their earliest places of habitation is not limited to Scandinavia, which anyone the least bit familiar with geography would know right away. It includes northern Germany.

    That map is also not supposed to be the map of the origin of U106 or of the Germanic branch of Indo-European. It is a map of the expansion of the Germans during the historical period. It does not cover the likely creation of Proto-Germanic among the people of the Corded Ware-Battle Axe Culture, or their movements from eastern Europe toward northern and central Europe.

    Leave a comment:


  • N21163
    replied
    Originally posted by 1798 View Post
    If you think that I am out to prove some people wrong.Then you are right.
    "Some people", it seems that you are out to prove genetic scientists wrong. If you are able to back your theories and methods with peer-reviewed journal articles, your statements would hold more weight.

    Originally posted by 1798 View Post
    You say you are interested in other branches of the Y-Tree but your interest in my branch is unusual.
    You consider my interest unusual because I make comment?

    Originally posted by 1798 View Post
    If you say that your branch originated in Scotland or England etc., I don't care.
    So inadvertently you feel I should not care where you believe your branch to be from?

    I can see why you would say this, as statements about the origin of my branch have no impact on yours.

    I do not share your sentiments. If you proposed a different opinion to the origins of my subclade I would ask you to provide sources to support your statements and consider your position. I would not dismiss it outright if it didn't fit with my views or beliefs.

    You stated you were interested in the truth. Your statements, so far, do not appear to be backed by plausible research, and I don't see how you find this approach to be credible.

    Leave a comment:


  • 1798
    replied
    If you think that I am out to prove some people wrong.Then you are right. You say you are interested in other branches of the Y-Tree but your interest in my branch is unusual. If you say that your branch originated in Scotland or England etc., I don't care.

    Leave a comment:


  • N21163
    replied
    Originally posted by 1798 View Post
    You stated that your paternal ancestor was L21. Why are you interested in U106?
    You and I covered this in previous posts:

    http://forums.familytreedna.com/show...81&postcount=8

    http://forums.familytreedna.com/show...6&postcount=11

    Originally posted by 1798 View Post
    I did not say that U106 originated in Ireland.
    Correction to my previous post:

    "Instead, you seem determined to convince yourself, and attempt to convince others, that your Y-DNA haplogroup subclade originated in Ireland.

    You appear determined to "prove" that you patrilineal ancestry has no association with any germanic, anglo-saxon or even viking peoples or historical invasions."

    Is this not the case?

    Originally posted by 1798 View Post
    If a subclade of U106, S5520 did originate in Ireland what is the problem? Does that not fit in with your ideology or what?
    There is no problem with this scenario, however, it appears to be the ONLY scenario you are willing to consider as a possibility.

    Is that not the case? Or would you consider that your SNP S5520 may not have originated in Ireland?

    Originally posted by 1798 View Post
    What straws are you clutching?
    I am clutching at no straws.
    As I previously stated:

    "As you feel that everyone else is wrong and you are right, please write a book or submit a journal article so that your theories and methods can be analyzed and scrutinised by genetic scientists.

    If this is too difficult, then please submit your theories and methods to genetic scientists so that they may publish your findings on your behalf."

    Leave a comment:


  • 1798
    replied
    Originally posted by N21163 View Post
    Fantasizing? Are you stating that There were no migrations from Scandanavia into central europe?

    You discuss in another thread that you "want the truth": http://forums.familytreedna.com/show...&postcount=306

    I don't see how you think that you your theories and methods prove anything.

    It does seem like you are clutching at straws. You claim that you "don't want U106 to originate in any particular region" but I find this hard to believe.

    Instead, you seem determined to convince yourself, and attempt to convince others, that your Y-DNA haplogroup originated in Ireland.

    You appear determined to "prove" that you patrilineal ancestry has no association with any germanic, anglo-saxon or even viking peoples or historical invasions.

    You have stated that numerous peer-reviewed studies, written by genetic scientists, archaeologists, anthropologists are wrong and you are not willing to accept that any of your methods, theories or beliefs are wrong.

    You continue to put forward circular arguments and straw man logical fallacies.

    As you feel that everyone else is wrong and you are right, please write a book or submit a journal article so that your theories and methods can be analyzed and scrutinised by genetic scientists.

    If this is too difficult, then please submit your theories and methods to genetic scientists so that they may publish your findings on your behalf.
    You stated that your paternal ancestor was L21. Why are you interested in U106? I did not say that U106 originated in Ireland. If a subclade of U106, S5520 did originate in Ireland what is the problem? Does that not fit in with your ideology or what? What straws are you clutching?

    Leave a comment:


  • N21163
    replied
    Originally posted by 1798 View Post
    This map shows the "Germanic" tribes coming from Scandinavia. Scandinavia is not the origin place of U106. Get your facts right and stop fantasizing.
    Fantasizing? Are you stating that There were no migrations from Scandanavia into central europe?

    You discuss in another thread that you "want the truth": http://forums.familytreedna.com/show...&postcount=306

    I don't see how you think that you your theories and methods prove anything.

    It does seem like you are clutching at straws. You claim that you "don't want U106 to originate in any particular region" but I find this hard to believe.

    Instead, you seem determined to convince yourself, and attempt to convince others, that your Y-DNA haplogroup originated in Ireland.

    You appear determined to "prove" that you patrilineal ancestry has no association with any germanic, anglo-saxon or even viking peoples or historical invasions.

    You have stated that numerous peer-reviewed studies, written by genetic scientists, archaeologists, anthropologists are wrong and you are not willing to accept that any of your methods, theories or beliefs are wrong.

    You continue to put forward circular arguments and straw man logical fallacies.

    As you feel that everyone else is wrong and you are right, please write a book or submit a journal article so that your theories and methods can be analyzed and scrutinised by genetic scientists.

    If this is too difficult, then please submit your theories and methods to genetic scientists so that they may publish your findings on your behalf.

    Leave a comment:


  • 1798
    replied
    Originally posted by Stevo View Post
    No, that is incorrect. There were Germanic-speakers in what is now southern Germany 2,000 years ago (circa A.D. 1).

    Map of Germanic Settlements

    Note the settlements on the Upper Rhine and along the Danube by 1 A.D.
    This map shows the "Germanic" tribes coming from Scandinavia. Scandinavia is not the origin place of U106. Get your facts right and stop fantasizing.

    Leave a comment:


  • Stevo
    replied
    Originally posted by Bartot View Post
    correct
    No, that is incorrect. There were Germanic-speakers in what is now southern Germany 2,000 years ago (circa A.D. 1).

    Map of Germanic Settlements

    Note the settlements on the Upper Rhine and along the Danube by 1 A.D.

    Leave a comment:


  • Stevo
    replied
    Originally posted by 1798 View Post
    What planet are you on?
    The literate planet.

    Leave a comment:


  • 1798
    replied
    Originally posted by Stevo View Post
    By that time, around 1 A.D., the Germans (meaning Germanic-speaking peoples) had moved into what is now southern Germany, bringing their predominant y haplogroups, R-U106 and I-M253 (among others), with them.

    Earlier, during the 1st millennium BC, they had begun pressing south and west, which was one of the reasons for the disturbances among the Celtic tribes in what are now Switzerland and France, as chronicled by Julius Caesar in his Gallic Wars.
    What planet are you on?

    Leave a comment:


  • Bartot
    replied
    Originally posted by 1798 View Post
    That is funny. There were no Germans living in southern Germany 2000 years ago.
    correct

    Leave a comment:


  • Stevo
    replied
    Originally posted by Stevo View Post
    By that time, around 1 A.D., the Germans (meaning Germanic-speaking peoples) had moved into what is now southern Germany, bringing their predominant y haplogroups, R-U106 and I-M253 (among others), with them.

    Earlier, during the 1st millennium BC, they had begun pressing south and west, which was one of the reasons for the disturbances among the Celtic tribes in what are now Switzerland and France, as chronicled by Julius Caesar in his Gallic Wars.
    In that last sentence I meant to say "during the 1st century BC", not "during the 1st millennium BC", although, obviously, the 1st century BC did occur during the 1st millennium BC.

    Sorry.

    Leave a comment:


  • Stevo
    replied
    Originally posted by 1798 View Post
    That is funny. There were no Germans living in southern Germany 2000 years ago.
    By that time, around 1 A.D., the Germans (meaning Germanic-speaking peoples) had moved into what is now southern Germany, bringing their predominant y haplogroups, R-U106 and I-M253 (among others), with them.

    Earlier, during the 1st millennium BC, they had begun pressing south and west, which was one of the reasons for the disturbances among the Celtic tribes in what are now Switzerland and France, as chronicled by Julius Caesar in his Gallic Wars.

    Leave a comment:


  • ironroad41
    replied
    its worse than you think!

    Originally posted by 1798 View Post
    That is funny. There were no Germans living in southern Germany 2000 years ago.
    There was no Germany, Scotland, Ireland or many of the current named Western European Countries 2000 years ago!!

    Leave a comment:


  • 1798
    replied
    [QUOTE=Bartot;389076



    roman records state no germans where in southern germany while the empire existed, so south germany has only been german less than 2000 years[/QUOTE]

    That is funny. There were no Germans living in southern Germany 2000 years ago.

    Leave a comment:

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