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CMH Question: I was but am I still?

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  • #76
    By these data seems that J's have outnumbered us, poor R1b1c, even in central Italy.
    Then I see that at the end of the day R1b1c is the first haplogroup in Italy and I wonder where those R1b1c guys are (do frequencies of 99.9% in the North give balance to the whole picture? ).
    Anyway Abruzzo (where L'Aquila is), unlike Latium which is central Italy, is traditionally regarded by Italians as southern more than central Italy. Why? History...
    Last edited by F.E.C.; 2 March 2007, 05:48 AM.

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    • #77
      Francesco:

      not really - the data I saw almost always show R1b beat J in S and especially C Italy, with percentages around 30-40%. Only occasionally this may be reversed, eg in Sicily (may be) and in random cities. So that corresponds pretty well with the percentages one sees in the Italy project.

      Mmaddi:
      I believe G2 is found at equally high percentages in Anatolia (may be 10%), so again it may be difficult to distinguish Anatolian versus Arabic contribution (or versus even earlier ones). But I have never looked into G.

      cacio

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      • #78
        Originally posted by cacio
        Francesco:

        not really - the data I saw almost always show R1b beat J in S and especially C Italy, with percentages around 30-40%. Only occasionally this may be reversed, eg in Sicily (may be) and in random cities. So that corresponds pretty well with the percentages one sees in the Italy project.
        Then it's very interesting to see that, despite such "duopolistic" numbers for R1b and J, in Italy there's still room for an outstanding variety of haplogroups.
        Last edited by F.E.C.; 2 March 2007, 12:02 PM.

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        • #79
          I don't think that much is known about the ancient Italian Jews and possible haplotypes. Their history is rather complex. Many moved north, past the Alps into Germany, eventually to become Ashkenazi. A high percentage of Ashkenazi followed this path. I have seen maps where the migratory path went through the midline of Italy not far from Abruzzo.
          Other Jews remained in the Mediterranian region and became part of the Sephardic population. In the Sephardic population are also Jews who fled Iberia and settled in Italy. In addition some Ashkenazi have returned to Italy.
          Consequently, the present Italian Jewish population may not be that representative of the ancient Jews of Rome.

          P.S. At Jewish Genealogy (Jewish Gen) one can find general information on Italian Jews of recent vintage.
          Last edited by josh w.; 2 March 2007, 12:49 PM.

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          • #80
            P.P.S. There is a website, "Jewish Genealogy in Italy" which contains a brief history as well as other info. I didn't see anything on dna but that may be in development.

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            • #81
              Thanks for the tips, Josh. Still, it would be interesting to see a study done on the Roman Jews, given the relatively stable longevity of that community.

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              • #82
                Originally posted by cacio
                Francesco:

                not really - the data I saw almost always show R1b beat J in S and especially C Italy, with percentages around 30-40%. Only occasionally this may be reversed, eg in Sicily (may be) and in random cities. So that corresponds pretty well with the percentages one sees in the Italy project.

                cacio
                In the Sicily Project, it has been very evenly distributed between R1b and J2. They were essentially tied for a few months. Then for some reason in December and January we had several new R1b members, so R1b pulled ahead. Then in February, I think we had 3 new J2 members to make it a little closer.

                Currently, we have 30 R1b paternal lines (27.8%) and 27 J2 paternal lines (25%).

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                • #83
                  By the way, I found this forum through a Google search but I can't figure out how to access forums through FTDNA's homepage. Help!

                  Thanks,

                  Vinnie

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                  • #84
                    Originally posted by vinnie
                    By the way, I found this forum through a Google search but I can't figure out how to access forums through FTDNA's homepage. Help!
                    Left side of the homepage, last link on the list. It's also listed at the top of the FAQ page. Both locations are somewhat inconspicuous -- would be better if the forums were also listed on everyone's myFTDNA page! But you can access the forums directly using the URL http://www.familytreedna.com/forum/

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                    • #85
                      Thank you much. Now I realize I was going to the log-in page, not the homepage...

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