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y-K haplotype?????????????

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  • Nagelfar
    replied
    Originally posted by Duke
    I belong to hg K2 same as Thomas Jefferson and we probably have the same haplotype.
    Well, check it out for yourself, this is the haplotype of Jefferson;

    DYS393=13, DYS390=12, DYS19=15, DYS391=10, DYS426=12, DYS388=12, DYS389I=12, DYS389II=27, DYS392=15, DYS156Y=7

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  • vineviz
    replied
    Originally posted by lgmayka
    The 'alternative' hypothesis is that ancient haplogroups like K2, E3b, F, and Q populated Paleolithic Europe before the R1b men came and took over the place, killing or outcompeting the earlier men except for a few rare survivors.
    K2 amounts to only about 4% of the Italy DNA Project results, but the haplotype diversity for this haplogroup in Italy is very high which suggests a relatively ancient population - quite possibly Paleolithic or Mesolithic.

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  • Kathleen Carrow
    replied
    Originally posted by Pleroma
    This is a link to a page on the Phoenician tin trade in Britain. I wouldn't know if it is accurate, but it's interesting:

    http://phoenicia.org/britmines.html
    I am just finishing Facing The Ocean by Barry Cunliffe and he believes that the Tin Trade and the pathways that it took replicated other movements like Celtic Tribes..
    and he thinks that "Celtic" per se involves more than one group with common or similar language and cultures..that came south from Germany/Bohemia due to population stress and followed the Meditereanean and the Phoenicians also..
    Interestingly for me the Atlantic Fringe groups that this encompasses includes my Maternal line's I1b1b who are found in Sardinia and my mtDNA haplogroup J2

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  • Pleroma
    replied
    This is a link to a page on the Phoenician tin trade in Britain. I wouldn't know if it is accurate, but it's interesting:

    http://phoenicia.org/britmines.html

    Leave a comment:


  • lgmayka
    replied
    The 'alternative' hypothesis is that ancient haplogroups like K2, E3b, F, and Q populated Paleolithic Europe before the R1b men came and took over the place, killing or outcompeting the earlier men except for a few rare survivors.

    Leave a comment:


  • cacio
    replied
    Or may be he's an Egyptian, since apparently a relatively close match was found in Egypt... I don't think Jefferson owned any slaves from Somalia and Tanzania, where K2 is also quite common - otherwise it would have been, even genetically, quite an interesting situation.

    Anyway, I'd go for a Mediterranean guy who moved north at some point, may be even during the Roman empire. K2 is found throughout the Mediterranean, including Italy and Spain. In Italy I believe it's something like 1-2%, a small but non-negligible fraction.

    cacio

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  • Kaiser
    replied
    Thomas Jefferson a Phoenician?

    DNA tests carried out on two British men have shed light on a mystery surrounding the ancestry of Thomas Jefferson, America's third president. This DNA type has now been found in two Britons with the Jefferson surname. Thomas Jefferson's haplogroup - shared with the two men from Britain - is known as K2.

    K2 is relatively common in Lebanon, from where Phoenicians, an ancient maritime trading culture, spread out across the Mediterranean leading to suggestions that European K2s may be descendents of these ancient traders.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/6332545.stm

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Jambalaia32
    I oftimes misspell.I guess my test scores will just have to be lower.And I don't always do spell check ,either,but thanks for mentioning it.
    I did not mean to make you angry. I see it spelled wrong all the time. You were closer than most people.

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  • Jambalaia32
    replied
    I know how to spell Lebanon-hit wrong key I guess.

    Originally posted by Kristin
    It is Lebanese. Not Labanese. I am always amazed no one can spell this right. With them being in the news as often as they are you would think people could remember.
    I oftimes misspell.I guess my test scores will just have to be lower.And I don't always do spell check ,either,but thanks for mentioning it.

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  • Jambalaia32
    replied
    Surname

    Originally posted by ragnar
    Why don't you read a book on how surnames have been acquired over time, in different countries & amongst different peoples. The same surname can be acquired from different origins. No surname is a "fraud", unless maybe someone was avoiding the "LAW" or trying to tie onto an "illustrious" family tree. And how do you know if the surname is a so-you-say "fraud" unless you have traced that family tree ? Yes, yes, I know you are not saying those surnames are frauds, but just don't fling that type of wording around so indiscriminately. It leaves a bad taste in one's mouth to read it. (Course maybe I need to go brush my teeth---)
    I was speaking of myself.People tend to latch onto something mobile you have and think it's bonafide yours and from what I found my gFathers name isn't his name ,but of someone who helped him-so our surname isn't actually what it is currently called.That might be further revealed if and when I get the paternal side tested and then we can see which surnames match his genes.That might then be our "real" name. He might have been a bad dude?

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  • Stevo
    replied
    Originally posted by lgmayka
    The Genographic Project only looks at the first 12 markers, plus the haplogroup. They probably tell every R1b member that he is Basque and descended from the Cro-Magnon.
    I think you're right.

    I should move to the Pyrenees.

    Maybe they'll give me a bota bag full of red wine and a flock of sheep to herd.

    Sounds like a good life!

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  • lgmayka
    replied
    Originally posted by Downer101
    My DNA test at the Genographic Project states that I am descended from the Cro-Magnons in Southern France and I am Basque.
    The Genographic Project only looks at the first 12 markers, plus the haplogroup. They probably tell every R1b member that he is Basque and descended from the Cro-Magnon.

    Do you have a Ysearch entry? How many markers have you tested? Just 12?

    Leave a comment:


  • Downer101
    replied
    All I know is that my name is ancient Saxon, from northwest Germany.. at about 550CE and pre-Germanic from 550CE and before.. Although, I must ask.. Stevo, I was told by the North-Sea Baltic Group that my ancestors are like the R1bF3, and came from central asia long ago.. He said about 9000 years ago and moved through the Baltic states.. Not that of the Ancient Britons that came into Albion 9000 yrs ago.. My DNA test at the Genographic Project states that I am descended from the Cro-Magnons in Southern France and I am Basque.. Even though I am R1b 23/11, which I heard is strong Germanic ancestry.. Which one is true?

    Leave a comment:


  • ragnar
    replied
    Originally posted by Jambalaia32
    Is everyone's surname their real,authentic,from God name or just an adopted or made up/aquired name? I think it's about 50/50.I'm not saying unrelated people with your name are frauds,but that everyone doesn't take a name so seriously.Maybe they /or someone just names themselves that to fit it or emulate a local.
    Why don't you read a book on how surnames have been acquired over time, in different countries & amongst different peoples. The same surname can be acquired from different origins. No surname is a "fraud", unless maybe someone was avoiding the "LAW" or trying to tie onto an "illustrious" family tree. And how do you know if the surname is a so-you-say "fraud" unless you have traced that family tree ? Yes, yes, I know you are not saying those surnames are frauds, but just don't fling that type of wording around so indiscriminately. It leaves a bad taste in one's mouth to read it. (Course maybe I need to go brush my teeth---)

    Leave a comment:


  • Stevo
    replied
    Originally posted by Kristin
    It is Lebanese. Not Labanese. I am always amazed no one can spell this right. With them being in the news as often as they are you would think people could remember.
    Maybe she was referring to Rachel and Leah?

    (Bible humor: they were the daughters of Laban, so they were "Labanese.")

    Sorry.

    Carry on.

    Leave a comment:

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