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Haplotupe G - why does it need "refinement"

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  • Haplotupe G - why does it need "refinement"

    Working on my brother's G haplo and it was suggested the I upgrade to do further refinement on it. Why is it difficult to determine? Are all make hapletype that way? I have mtDNA done and haplogroup was pretty clear.

  • #2
    Originally posted by radio1
    Working on my brother's G haplo and it was suggested the I upgrade to do further refinement on it. Why is it difficult to determine? Are all make hapletype that way? I have mtDNA done and haplogroup was pretty clear.
    There is a Y- haplogroup G web site here: http://home.comcast.net/~whitathey/indexg.htm

    Maybe it can help answer your questions.

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    • #3
      What I don't understand yet...

      I am a female. My haplogroup is "HV1". That is, in theory my mother's mother's mother's, etc. And the research I've done corroberates the approximate geographic location I would have expected them to come from. No surprise there. When I asked my brother got contribue to the yDNA at ftDNA he did so. He got 25 markers (currently upgrading to 37) and they determined his haplotype was "G". We had the same mother. Why would his be different? I thought a man's yDNA was his father's father's fathers' etc but that his mother's mtDNA continued to the son for just the one generation and after that would be replaced (theoretically) in his son by the man's wife. I'm not sure I'm making myself clear. I'm clearly new at this. But I'm reading everything I can get my hands on and still there are just some things that make no sense to me at all.
      I can't seem to find someone will to put this into terminology that makes it less mysticism and more pedestrian.
      Basically I guess I'm asking why my brother and I don't have the same haplogroup if we had the same mother. Who's does he have?

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      • #4
        yDNA versus mtDNA

        Originally posted by radio1
        I am a female. My haplogroup is "HV1". That is, in theory my mother's mother's mother's, etc. And the research I've done corroberates the approximate geographic location I would have expected them to come from. No surprise there. When I asked my brother got contribue to the yDNA at ftDNA he did so. He got 25 markers (currently upgrading to 37) and they determined his haplotype was "G". We had the same mother. Why would his be different?
        You stated the reason yourself in your post quote above - "When I asked my brother got contribue to the yDNA at ftDNA he did so." FTDNA was testing your brother's yDNA, not his mtDNA. So the results show the haplogroup of your brother's and father's paternal line. If they had tested your brother's mtDNA, it would have matched yours, since you both received it from your mother.

        Mike Maddi

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        • #5
          Brother's ydna

          So, if my brother, who did a ydna test - 25 marker being upgraded to 37 - had done an mtdna test, would it have been identical to my own knowing that we have the same mother? I made the incorrect assumption that because we had the same mother that his haplogroup would have been the same as mine. I mistakenly thought that a haplogroup was a strickly "female" division. So, since my brother's haplogroup is "G" then does that mean that he inherited it from his father? And father's fathers', etc. Or are ther combinations of haplotypes from both parents? So then, is it correct that a man can have 2 haplotypes? One from his mtdna and one from his ydna?

          I appreciate any light you can shine of the subject. I'm desperately trying to learn.
          Thanks for your generous attention.

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          • #6
            Haplogroups - yDNA and mtDNA

            Originally posted by radio1
            So, if my brother, who did a ydna test - 25 marker being upgraded to 37 - had done an mtdna test, would it have been identical to my own knowing that we have the same mother? I made the incorrect assumption that because we had the same mother that his haplogroup would have been the same as mine. I mistakenly thought that a haplogroup was a strickly "female" division. So, since my brother's haplogroup is "G" then does that mean that he inherited it from his father? And father's fathers', etc. Or are ther combinations of haplotypes from both parents? So then, is it correct that a man can have 2 haplotypes? One from his mtdna and one from his ydna?

            I appreciate any light you can shine of the subject. I'm desperately trying to learn.
            Thanks for your generous attention.
            You have to remember that haplogroup can refer either to a man's yDNA, inherited along the paternal line, or a man or woman's mtDNA, inherited along the maternal line. So, a man has both a yDNA haplogroup, inherited from his father, and an mtDNA haplogroup, inherited from his mother. They are apples and oranges - yDNA haplogroup J has nothing to do with mtDNA haplogroup J, even though they have the same name.

            The only way there is a combination of haplotypes is in the 22 pairs of chromosomes called autosomal. These are the non-sex determining chromosomes. One of each pair comes from the mother and the other from the father, who in turn got each of their 22 pair of autosomal chromosomes from each of their parents, etc. So the autosomal chromosomes represent a little bit from all your ancestors' lines. The yDNA only represents the y chromosome a man inherits from his father and the paternal line beyond his father. What your brother had was a yDNA test which measured the various repeats at the markers tested - this is his haplotype for his paternal line.

            There are autosomal chromosome tests, but these are not exact in their interpretation, since they are testing a combination of all your ancestors' DNA that you received - the test can't say which of your ancestors gave you a certain marker or physical trait. That test can only speak in generalities about your genetic background, including ethnic makeup.

            Mike

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            • #7
              A thousand thanks

              Mike;
              I cannot thank you enough for your post in response to my plea. I've been wandering around here for weeks trying to put it all together.
              At the beginning of your response you said "You have to remember that a haplogroup can refer either to a man's yDNA.... or woman's mtDNA." Well, actually I couldn't "remember" that because no one ever told me. I didn't find it on any of the documents I received or on my web pages. I don't mean to sound like I'm suffering from a case of being literal, but I've found that the site operators are taking for granted that I know what I'm doing. I read up on the mtDNA for weeks before requested my test. I thought it might give me a running start. Then I decided to do the HVR2 test upgrade and comprehension became more of a challenge. But when my brother's results came in I realized that I didn't have a clue. And I couldn't find the information I needed in the right terminology. It was either too simplistic and didn't answer my questions or it was out of my league.
              This is like learning another language by total immersion. I will make mistakes, that is a given... but it's feels like I'm in a foreign city and suddenly I find myself, in public, without any clothes on, so to speak, and I don't know the language well enough to ask for some.

              So thanks for taking a leap and explaining the difference. I appreciate it.

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              • #8
                For a good introduction to the field try Steven Oppenheimer's "The Real Eve" or Spencer Well's "The Journey Of Man".

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