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What is the difference?

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  • What is the difference?

    I've just received my 37-marker results, and I'm R1b1. If I want to do further testing I can do the deep clade, or I can go for the 59-marker test. Is the 59-marker test inclusive of the deep clade test? Other than the number of markers tested, will one test provide any information the other test will not?

  • #2
    The deep-clade test is an SNP test, while the 59-marker is an STR test.

    From what I've read, the bulk of R1b1s cannot be assigned to any of FTDNA's deep clades. There is an 80% chance that you are classified as R1b1c*. You might want to wait until R1b1 is better resolved before you take a one time deep clade test. Otherwise you might have to test again at a later time.

    The 59-marker test is an STR upgrade from your 37 markers, which further narrows down the number of R1b1s that share a common mutation history with your ancestor. As there might be some correlation between STR clusters and possible R1b1-subgroups (for which a corresponding SNP has yet to be discovered), the 59-marker upgrade is probably the best testing alternative for R1b1 members at the moment.

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    • #3
      Alternative to FTDNA for R1b SNP test

      Originally posted by anka
      From what I've read, the bulk of R1b1s cannot be assigned to any of FTDNA's deep clades. There is an 80% chance that you are classified as R1b1c*. You might want to wait until R1b1 is better resolved before you take a one time deep clade test. Otherwise you might have to test again at a later time.
      I do appreciate all the great work that FTDNA has done in making DNA testing available at an affordable price to people and the great services they provide to various projects that their website hosts. However, there is an alternative for SNP testing that is especially a good alternative for R1b's.

      I'm referring to EthnoAncestry (www.ethnoancestry.com) which mostly does SNP testing, although they have just introduced an 18 marker STR test, which shares 6 markers in common with the new 22 marker panel that FTDNA has just started offering. Ethnoancestry is not as cheap as FTDNA for SNP testing but the company is oriented to cutting edge testing and finding new SNPs. In the last year they have discovered many new SNPs in the R1b, J and I haplogroups.

      I know mainly about their new R1b SNPs, since that's my haplogroup. They have discovered 5 new R1b SNPs - S21, S25, S26, S28 and S29. Before the discovery of these SNPs in the second half of last year, the vast majority of R1b's could only be classified as R1b1c (M269+), as you mention above. This does not give you much information about your deep ancestry when 40% of those of European descent are of that haplogroup. Now with these 5 new R1b SNPs, there is much more that is able to be said about R1b and its subclades and how they fit into pre-historic and ancient historic period migrations in Europe. I have tested S21+ and the fact that my paternal line is Sicilian and that another FTDNA customer who tested S21+ is from an Italian line is leading to some interesting theories about where R1b/S21+ may have spent the Ice Age and where it moved when the Ice Age ended to repopulate northern Europe.

      So, if you are R1b and very interested in your deep ancestry and how it fits into migrations throughout Europe over millenia, I suggest you seriously consider SNP testing at EthnoAncestry.

      Mike Maddi

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