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What is I1cSTR1?

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  • What is I1cSTR1?

    There seems to be a change going on. On the devices to measure your sub clade I seem to be very close to what is called I1cSTR1 ( maybe 3 off). This group seems to be changing over to I1b2a because of new discoveries of markers and where they fit. I can not figure out which I1b2a group I belong in. I1b2a1, I1b2a2, I1b2a3, or I1b2a4 which one? Who are all these groups?

  • #2
    check Nortvedt's tree...

    On his site northwestanalysis.net

    This shows how I breaks down, including "old" I1C

    http://www.northwestanalysis.net/Iweb.jpg

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    • #3
      I1cSTR1

      Thanks for the help.

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      • #4
        I1cSTR1

        Thanks for the help. I am still not sure which group I1cSTR1 is equal to. In what parts of Britain do you find this group?

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        • #5
          see this paper for more...

          http://www.familytreedna.com/pdf/capelli2_CB.pdf

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          • #6
            I1cSTR1 is I1b2a1?

            If I understand the paper which was good. My Y ancestor was most probably in Britain in the stone age along with other non-I haplogroups.

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            • #7
              I think I would recognize you?

              why england during the stone-age?

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              • #8
                I am curious about all these HGs and subgroups, since I don't know my own yet.

                They're all fascinating to me.

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                • #9
                  Hi Stevo...

                  I caught these "I" people trying to stake a claim in my R1B Western Atlantic Stone-Age Europe..

                  Maybe they are Viking Invaders!...
                  Last edited by M.O'Connor; 21 April 2006, 05:29 PM.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by M.O'Connor
                    Hi Stevo...

                    I caught these "I" people trying to stake a claim in my R1B Western Atlantic Stone-Age Europe..

                    Maybe they are Viking Invaders!...
                    Lol.

                    I'll have to keep quiet until I know my own Stone Age situation.

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                    • #11
                      hehe...well one way or another people end up moving around.

                      There were some Graves found not far from Stonehenge. Perhaps 4300 yrs old if my memory is with me. As teeth develope they have traces within of the water they drank growing up. this can be matched with water from different areas.

                      One person is thought to be from the Alps area. Somehow he got to England during a time when Stone Henge was active.

                      An occupant of another grave near was believed to possibly be his son. They shared a skeletal deformity that pointed to association. This persons teeth indicated he grew up in England.

                      Be sure to look under "FINDS" to see the grave good, including the oldest
                      gold items found in England. Copper knives. flint knives, Boar tusks and
                      flint arrowheads...and more.

                      Other graves nearby contained people from the area in Wales where the Blue Stones for Stone Henge were quarried.

                      http://www.wessexarch.co.uk/projects...ry/archer.html
                      Last edited by M.O'Connor; 22 April 2006, 05:17 PM.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by The Article Linked Above
                        The Archer may have spoken an early form of Celtic.
                        The "Amesbury Archer" finds are extremely interesting. The beaker pottery associated with the burials seems to tie the archer to the advance of the Celts into Britain. The fact that he came from Switzerland would support the idea that Celtic language and culture were imported into Britain, at least in part.

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