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What if I'm female and want to know paternal ancestors?

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  • What if I'm female and want to know paternal ancestors?

    Is there a test for females that tell paternal ancestors? Does the Mito test only reveal mothers ancestors? I don't need to know that, Already know that.

  • #2
    FTDNA tests the Y-Chromosome for the paternal line. A sample would need to come from a brother, your father, a brother to your dad, or a a son of one of your dad's brothers. You could move back a generation and follow the same approach.

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    • #3
      Paternal

      Through my genealogy research, I found we are probably Melungeon descent. However, my Dad left 3 GIRLS when he died last month. I have items that may contain his DNA. Can this be used for testing and how would I do that? Thanks Denise Wood

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      • #4
        Originally posted by deniseobx
        Through my genealogy research, I found we are probably Melungeon descent. However, my Dad left 3 GIRLS when he died last month. I have items that may contain his DNA. Can this be used for testing and how would I do that? Thanks Denise Wood

        DA Fingerprint and Trace Genetics offer "DNA retrieval" on their websites, there are doubtless other labs as well. Google it. (if you could retrieve a medical lab sample that would be best!) Or you could test a brother of your father if available. Or you could test all three daughters via an autosomal test (DNAPrint or Ethnoancestrsy) that registers the DNA contribution of both your parents - you would test all three to get a range of values because the autosomal DNA gets resorted at every birth - and the more that you have establish about your mother's ancestry the better you will be able to factor her ancestry out of the autosomal results.

        Good Luck!
        tom

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        • #5
          Originally posted by ruflaura3
          Is there a test for females that tell paternal ancestors? Does the Mito test only reveal mothers ancestors? I don't need to know that, Already know that.
          Give Birth to a Boy baby then test his DNA !!! and you can keep the boy and play with him!!!
          Last edited by Jambalaia32; 13 June 2006, 05:55 AM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Jambalaia32
            Give Birth to a Boy baby then test his DNA !!!
            Interesting idea but technically incorrect. The boy will have his own father's Y chromosome, not his mother's father's.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by ruflaura3
              Is there a test for females that tell paternal ancestors? Does the Mito test only reveal mothers ancestors? I don't need to know that, Already know that.
              What Jim said is correct: It has to be a male sample. Did your father have any brothers? Is your father's father still around and did he have any sons besides your father?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by deniseobx
                Through my genealogy research, I found we are probably Melungeon descent. However, my Dad left 3 GIRLS when he died last month. I have items that may contain his DNA. Can this be used for testing and how would I do that? Thanks Denise Wood
                Denise, A while ago I saw this flyer at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas that said they do DNA testing. I didn't know enough about Genealogy DNA testing, at the time, to be able to ask them if their tests give you the same results, so I don't know if they could take your dad's "DNA items" and give you what they would if he could give them a cheek scraping or a blood sample. And I'm still not sure if they could give you marker numbers like FamilyTreeDNA can. Their prices seemed unbeatable, though ($10 + $0.30/allele or something). I would suggest asking FamilyTreeDNA if they can do something like that. It may be against their policy to test on someone who can't give approval, though.

                P.S. Just out of curiosity, what are these "items" that may contain your dad's DNA?

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                • #9
                  melungeon

                  I thought I had thing straighten out.........I'm still a little confused about my husband Hvr1 test that came back Le3b2.

                  He went to his new general Practitioner this past Wednesday for his yearly physical and during the examination the doctor examine his ears, neck head and throat area. He rub the back of his head and felt what he called a bump. He stop and flip through his pages and called a nurse in and asked if my husband has further medical records. The nurse implied yes left the room and came back with some folders. The doctor took a few moments to go through them and then look toward my husband and asked him if he was aware that he had a bump in the back of his head. My husband response was yes. I've been aware of it since childhood.The other kids and adults was always rubbing my head". His doctor proceded to say that passed doctor had identified the bump as being what is called an "Anatolian Bump" found mostly in people in the mediterrean area known as the Anatolian region of Turkey.They indicated that some of his ancestry's had been from mediterranean area. I often felt the bump while combing his hair and at first was alarm (however his physicians informed us everything was fine-yet never indicated this term). Have anyone every heard of this term "Anatolian Bump -It is also said to be found in some native American people.

                  So if this finding is present in my husband why does he registed as L3e2b -African descent in the HVR1 testing. Does the term african completely refer to a person with full original african feature or does it include those individual with mixed African descent. TomCat help -you resolved the sub-sarahan and sub- equatioral issuE... Do you or anyone out there have knowledge of this "Anatolian Bump"(here iIN american it is said to be affiliate with the melungeon people.........HELP! I'm cofused again

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                  • #10
                    tcarter952:

                    I don't know much about anatolian bump. However, L3e2b is the mitochondrial DNA. The mitochondrial DNA is passed on from mothers to the children, so, as such, it only tells you about the female lineage (mother-maternal grandmother-maternal ggmother etc.). This is only one of the many ancestors. In principle, all of your ancestors could be from somewhere else except this one female ancestor along the purely female line.

                    Most of your DNA comes from other ancestors. And also remember that the mtDNA does not code for any physical trait at all. These depend on other genes, which, as said, could come from other ancestors.

                    Said that, I don't know in which populations the Anatolian bump is found, and I would not be surprised if it were found also in parts of Subsaharan Africa.

                    cacio

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                    • #11
                      [QUOTE=tcarter952...
                      TomCat help -you resolved the sub-sarahan and sub- equatioral issuE... Do you or anyone out there have knowledge of this "Anatolian Bump"(here iIN american it is said to be affiliate with the melungeon people ... [/QUOTE]

                      The Melungeon are often referred to as tri-racial, African-European-Native American, so I guess the 'bump' might have come from any of those lines. Google 'Melungeon' and you will find sites treating with this topic. The Melungeon had a geographically specific history and range and there are only a handful of families identified as Melungeon when they were identifiably 'different' and the term Melungeon was in use.

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                      • #12
                        Melungeon

                        Originally posted by tcarter952
                        I thought I had thing straighten out.........I'm still a little confused about my husband Hvr1 test that came back Le3b2.

                        He went to his new general Practitioner this past Wednesday for his yearly physical and during the examination the doctor examine his ears, neck head and throat area. He rub the back of his head and felt what he called a bump. He stop and flip through his pages and called a nurse in and asked if my husband has further medical records. The nurse implied yes left the room and came back with some folders. The doctor took a few moments to go through them and then look toward my husband and asked him if he was aware that he had a bump in the back of his head. My husband response was yes. I've been aware of it since childhood.The other kids and adults was always rubbing my head". His doctor proceded to say that passed doctor had identified the bump as being what is called an "Anatolian Bump" found mostly in people in the mediterrean area known as the Anatolian region of Turkey.They indicated that some of his ancestry's had been from mediterranean area. I often felt the bump while combing his hair and at first was alarm (however his physicians informed us everything was fine-yet never indicated this term). Have anyone every heard of this term "Anatolian Bump -It is also said to be found in some native American people.

                        So if this finding is present in my husband why does he registed as L3e2b -African descent in the HVR1 testing. Does the term african completely refer to a person with full original african feature or does it include those individual with mixed African descent. TomCat help -you resolved the sub-sarahan and sub- equatioral issuE... Do you or anyone out there have knowledge of this "Anatolian Bump"(here iIN american it is said to be affiliate with the melungeon people.........HELP! I'm cofused again

                        http://www.jgoins.com/ Jack Goins is an excellent source for Melungeon research. There is not one specific trait. These people that were called Melungeon came from a certain area. DNA on these people have come up with many different backrounds. It is till a work in progress finding out who these people were.

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                        • #13
                          This is the most commonly asked question of me from you ladies, "there are no male descendants left to DNA test"
                          My reply is always the same, you are wrong! You haven't looked at your family tree back far enough to find living male cousins to your father.

                          He doesn't even really need to be a real close cousin to your father, he only needs to share the same surname with a solid paper trail showing that cousin is related to your father.

                          Some where back in your family tree, is a branch who does have living male descendants who could DNA test in place of your father, you just need to start searching the family tree to find your cousins is all.
                          What many of you ladies are failing to understand is, all the male family members of the same surname all share the exact same or near exact same Y chromosome, so even if your father and brothers and uncles are deceased, a distant male cousin can test in place of your father.

                          So get to digging in the paper records and find your living male cousins and ask them to DNA test in place of your father. If needed, offer to help pay for his test!

                          There is no such thing as no living male ancestors alive to DNA test, other wise we would be extinct! lol.
                          And who knows, you may enjoy working on the family tree and become the next genealogist!

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                          • #14
                            Donald is RIGHT, ladies!
                            I did not grow up with my bio Dad, & when I decided to test & knew I needed to track down a male family member, I just got online & looked up my bio Dad's brother (who I had never talked to) & called him.
                            He was very nice about it & gave me the sample. Of course, I paid for it.
                            Yes, it WAS uncomfortable, but well worth it!
                            FTDNA stores the sample for 20 years, so I don't ever have to ask again, Thank goodness!
                            Good luck ladies!
                            Cinda

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Cinda
                              Donald is RIGHT, ladies!
                              I did not grow up with my bio Dad, & when I decided to test & knew I needed to track down a male family member, I just got online & looked up my bio Dad's brother (who I had never talked to) & called him.
                              He was very nice about it & gave me the sample. Of course, I paid for it.
                              Yes, it WAS uncomfortable, but well worth it!
                              FTDNA stores the sample for 20 years, so I don't ever have to ask again, Thank goodness!
                              Good luck ladies!
                              Cinda
                              In your case I hope your bio dad's brother is his brother thru the same father and not just the mother.

                              In my case, my bio father has one sister. And he has 3 brothers and 2 more sisters, but they are my fathers half siblings. They have the same mother but not the same father. It would be interesting to me what their admixture test results would be, if they have Native American on their mothers side.
                              My fathers father had brothers that had sons, I thought they knew of me because I had been corresponding with a great aunt for years, but it turns out she never told anyone about me, just as my grandmother never told her family about me either. My fathers cousins have an online family forum, but I was quickly banned. That was years ago. So...I doubt they'd do the Y-dna test for me, and I couldn't care less anymore. Besides, if there was a non-paternal event somewhere, it wouldn't be accurate anyway.
                              At least I managed to get the paternity test done years ago.
                              Last edited by rainbow; 18 September 2007, 09:33 PM.

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