Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Y-DNA match worth atDNA testing?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Y-DNA match worth atDNA testing?

    We don't know the identity of my maternal great-grandfather. I have tested my maternal uncle's Y-DNA and he came back with two matches at the 37 marker level. Both of these matches have the same surname and they match each other with 34/37. They also trace both of their MRCA to the same general region (north and south Carolina) in the 1700's. I match one of them as a 35/37 match and the other as a 33/37 match. 95% TMRCA within the last 6 generations for the 35/37 match and 95% TMRCA within 10 generations for the 33/37 match. I haven't been able to trace anything via the papertrail and I am thinking of recruiting descendents of the earliest known ancestor along the 35/37 match line to do a Family Finder test. Do you think this might be worth while? Any suggestions on where to go from here are welcome.

  • #2
    I suppose you don't share a surname with your Y line matches, and also suppose your aim is to cast a wider net in the hope of finding a match with records that supplement yours and and those of the Y line matches.

    With your maternal uncle at 6 generations distant from his closest Y match you are at or beyond the power of Family Finder to identify, reliably, autosomal segments shared by them. You might still share some segments but you would then need to be able to exclude all other possible lines of descent in order to attribute shared segments to a shared Y line.

    As the Y line seems to be of particular interest why not drill down on that? Are you part of an FTDNA Y geographical, Y lineage or Y surname project?
    Last edited by tomcat; 23 December 2012, 09:16 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      I agree with tomcat and would suggest that the first thing to do is to get everyone involved - or at least the closest of your matches and yourself - upgraded to at least 67 markers. You never know; your two current 37-marker neighbors might evaporate at 67 markers. It wouldn't be the first time. If they stay close, then you might be onto something.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by tomcat View Post
        As the Y line seems to be of particular interest why not drill down on that? Are you part of an FTDNA Y geographical, Y lineage or Y surname project?
        Hi Tocat: I am a part of a surname project via worldfamilies and match the same two indivduals in worldfamilies surname project and in ysearch. I have entered my data into ancestry.com and Sorenson as well, but they are the only two significant matches.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Stevo View Post
          I agree with tomcat and would suggest that the first thing to do is to get everyone involved - or at least the closest of your matches and yourself - upgraded to at least 67 markers. You never know; your two current 37-marker neighbors might evaporate at 67 markers. It wouldn't be the first time. If they stay close, then you might be onto something.
          Good point. My 35/37 match has been non-responsive. I assume the best of people, so I assume he may be old or deceased, which is why he hasn't responded. I have seen others on the web who claim descent from the same ancestor born in 1750, so I may be able to recruit others. How many people would you reccomend that I recruit to have a good pool to test this hypothesis?

          Comment


          • #6
            I would start with whomever you can talk into upgrading.

            That's the hard part, unless you're willing to pay for it.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by nwgen View Post
              Hi Tocat: I am a part of a surname project via worldfamilies and match the same two indivduals in worldfamilies surname project and in ysearch. I have entered my data into ancestry.com and Sorenson as well, but they are the only two significant matches.
              So, you match them on DNA but do not match them on surnames?
              Or, you match them on both DNA and surnames?

              In the first case, a potential NPE, I suggest you raise-the-ante by testing your maternal uncle's Y DNA to the maximum. You will, thereby, have set a test standard your DNA matches should feel obliged to meet to defensibly prove their line, as opposed to your line, does not descend from the NPE.

              I would follow the same course in the second case, although as "family" I would try to gain the cooperation of the matches.

              Your WorldFamilies Project admin might guide you in test selection, but if her or she is not useful you could contact the admin(s) of appropriate FTDNA project(s) for guidance, and possibly join such project(s).
              Last edited by tomcat; 26 December 2012, 07:59 AM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by nwgen View Post
                ...
                Both of these matches have the same surname and they match each other with 34/37. They also trace both of their MRCA to the same general region (north and south Carolina) in the 1700's.
                ...
                Depending on the STR's on which they differ from one another (some STR's are slower to change than others - don't ask me, I am not an expert) the divergence in their Y line may have occurred in the Old Country (England, Ulster, Scotland, the Borderland?) or in the New if they both have a deeper, albeit unknown to them, New World genealogy.

                You are evidently closer to one than the other, or intermediate between them, suggesting an order of descent, but you quite plausibly could be descended from another, related but untested Y Line (again conclusions are only tentative and depend on marker mutability and deeper testing).
                Last edited by tomcat; 26 December 2012, 08:49 AM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  tomcat said:
                  some STR's are slower to change than others - don't ask me, I am not an expert
                  I keep hearing this on the board but looking through the Y Faq Menu, I can't find a listing of which snps are slower/faster. I did find this, and wonder if it relates:

                  D stands for DNA.
                  Y stands for Y-chromosome.
                  S, Z, or F stands for the complexity of the repeat segment.
                  S is a unique segment.
                  Z is a number of repetitive segments at one site.
                  F is a segment that has multiple copies on the Y-chromosome.
                  If not, does anyone have a cheat-sheet list for determining which snps are faster/slower? Thanks

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    See 23-27:

                    http://www.familytreedna.com/faq/answers.aspx?id=9#920

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thanks Wills. Although the FAQ doesn't specify marker speed it gives a hint and says this relevant to the case under discussion:

                      A 33/37 match between two men who share a common surname (or variant) means they may share a common male ancestor. This relationship should be confirmed with additional testing.

                      The only way to confirm the relationship is to test additional family lines and to find where the mutations took place. By testing additional family lines you can find the person in between. This 'in betweener' is essential for you to find.


                      In the present case, the poster may be the 'in-betweener' as the poster is 34/37 between a 33/37 and a 35/37. But, again that would depend on the markers at variance.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X