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Y-Haplogroup Backbone Test???

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  • Y-Haplogroup Backbone Test???

    I just noticed that they are doing a Y-DNA backbone test on my father. I ordered a 37 marker Y-DNA test Nov 12 and his 12 marker results were posted last night. He has no matches at that level.

    I understand that the backbone test is free when they can't determine a person's haplogroup through the regular test. My grandfather was born in Cappelle sul Tavo, a village near Pescara, Italy.

    I hope they don't use all my father's DNA because he is elderly and in very poor health and I probably won't be able to get another sample. I had them send an extra vial last summer when I ordered his Family Finder. He only has about a dozen matches, including myself and my cousin, on that test.

    I wonder if there is anything unusual about his haplogroup.

  • #2
    FTDNA in most cases is able to predict the yDNA haplogroup by looking at the SNP-tested matches the person has at the 12 marker level. If there are multiple haplogroups among his 12 marker matches or no matches at all, they have no way of accurately predicting the haplogroup. That's when someone is given the free backbone test to establish the basic haplogroup. You can read more about the backbone test and what haplogroups it will look for at http://www.familytreedna.com/faq/answers.aspx?id=8#515

    The reason most people are given the backbone test is that they have at least two or more unusual marker values among the first 12 markers. That causes them to not have any matches or have matches from multiple haplogroups. Also, since you mention that your father has Italian ancestry, that may be a factor. Most of FTDNA's database has British Isles or northern European ancestry, so a significant number of customers with Italian ancestry, more than average, end up being given the backbone test. There just aren't that many other men in the database with Italian ancestry and Italy has more of a range of haplogroups than are found in northern Europe.

    Also, I don't think you need to worry about your father's DNA sample being used up based on just a few tests. I've had 37 yDNA markers tested and upgraded to 67 markers;the backbone test; had HVR1/HV2 mtDNA tested and upgraded to the full sequence; and had multiple tests for SNPs and misc. ySTR markers before I had to provide a new DNA sample.

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    • #3
      My father's results are in. His haplogroup is J2.

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      • #4
        I'm glad you asked this test because my son also couldn't be grouped with the first results and I saw that he had a Backbone Test and had no idea what it was. He's J2 (something) as well. His full results are not in, it's missing one set.

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        • #5
          My cousin's results did not predict a haplogroup at 12. I called and they told me to wait until 37 marker results came in. Those came in and the 67 markers too, but no haplogroup. So they ran the backbone and he came back r1b1a2.

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          • #6
            We've had that happen twice. My wife's grandfather's Y-DNA was Q1a3a1. My African-American son-in-law was E1b1a. Is it because these haplogroups haven't been tested for much and our tests were some of the first of these particular subclades and had to be really looked over to determine?

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            • #7
              FTDNA normally predicts your Y-DNA Haplogroup based on your 12 marker Haplotype. If they don't have enough similar result matching yours they run the Backbone test.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Jim Barrett View Post
                FTDNA normally predicts your Y-DNA Haplogroup based on your 12 marker Haplotype. If they don't have enough similar result matching yours they run the Backbone test.
                My fathers kit had a backbone test done also, as Jim mentions it is usually based on your 12 marker results. If you match say 10 other people of a certain haplogroup then they give you a predicted haplogroup.

                If you don't have any matches in database they will have to run a backbone test to determine your haplogroup. ( I assume they base it on number of exact matches at 12 marker level)

                If you look at your yDNA matches page, any match listed with a " - " has a predicted haplogroup.

                In my fathers case at 12 and 25 marker level, every match was a GD of 1 or greater, 37 marker with a GD of 3 or greater, and 67 marker with a GD of 4 to 8.

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                • #9
                  Y-Haplogroup Backbone test

                  I also had that test on my brother's y-dna. Came out as haplogroup O. No matches up to 67 markers for a few months now. Not sure where I go from here. Haplotree page says I am eligible for an upgrade (deep clade?) but options do not seem available and deep clade not a good idea at present, it seems. Any advice please?

                  Paternal line O-M175
                  Maternal line W1e

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by janeliz View Post
                    I also had that test on my brother's y-dna. Came out as haplogroup O. No matches up to 67 markers for a few months now. Not sure where I go from here. Haplotree page says I am eligible for an upgrade (deep clade?) but options do not seem available and deep clade not a good idea at present, it seems. Any advice please?

                    Paternal line O-M175
                    Maternal line W1e
                    First, if you haven't already done this: Go to your brother's Y-DNA Matches page and specifically set it to 67 markers, 7 steps. Let it run until it either shows a match, or stops at 12 markers. Very often, even a very unusual haplotype (pattern of marker values) will find a distant match at 7 steps on 25 markers.

                    Second, you can upload his 67 markers into the Ysearch database, and look for even more distant matches.

                    Third, you should join the O Project. The project administrator might be able to classify your haplotype more precisely at 67 markers than FTDNA (which uses only 12 or 14 markers).

                    Fourth, you can look for 9-marker matches in the YHRD database. But this database has no names or email addresses, only locations.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by lgmayka View Post
                      Go to your brother's Y-DNA Matches page and specifically set it to 67 markers, 7 steps.
                      Then click the Run Report button.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by lgmayka View Post
                        First, if you haven't already done this: Go to your brother's Y-DNA Matches page and specifically set it to 67 markers, 7 steps. Let it run until it either shows a match, or stops at 12 markers. Very often, even a very unusual haplotype (pattern of marker values) will find a distant match at 7 steps on 25 markers.

                        Second, you can upload his 67 markers into the Ysearch database, and look for even more distant matches.

                        Third, you should join the O Project. The project administrator might be able to classify your haplotype more precisely at 67 markers than FTDNA (which uses only 12 or 14 markers).

                        Fourth, you can look for 9-marker matches in the YHRD database. But this database has no names or email addresses, only locations.
                        Many thanks for your reply. Sorry I didn't see this earlier. Have done some of your suggestions, but will try the rest

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