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My confirmed haplogroup: R-FT176237

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  • My confirmed haplogroup: R-FT176237

    I decided to go for Big Y and now my Haplogroup has moved from R-M269 to R-FT176237

    Unfortunately I have no matches at B-Y700 level. Only at 12 and 25 markers. ( 687 and 247 matches ) ( no 37, 67 or 111 ! )

    Is it normal that FTDNA give a Haplogruop and then change it?

    For one or two days the Haplogroup was R-FT176055 and then it changed to R-FT176237.

    The other strange thing is that in the Time tree I am below R-FT174024 and that is not one of my STR.

    Should I ask FTDNA?
    Time tree FTDNA.jpgblock tree.jpg

  • #2
    It is very normal for your automatic haplogroup assignment to change after a manual review. FTDNA has a dedicated haplotree specialist that uses the latest Big Y results to refine haplogroup branches.

    Looking at it quickly, my guess is that the computer assigned you to R-FT176055 because you matched some of those SNPs. Because you only had some, the specialist moved you backward by one branch to R-FT176237 and reorganized the whole section using your results, including renaming R-FT176055 to R-FT174024. I think.

    It looks like the Time Tree hasn’t been updated since the manual correction was made. It knows that R-FT176055 was renamed to R-FT174024, but it doesn’t yet know that you were reassigned. FTDNA has been updating the Discover site only every one or two weeks.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by nooni View Post
      It is very normal for your automatic haplogroup assignment to change after a manual review. FTDNA has a dedicated haplotree specialist that uses the latest Big Y results to refine haplogroup branches.

      Looking at it quickly, my guess is that the computer assigned you to R-FT176055 because you matched some of those SNPs. Because you only had some, the specialist moved you backward by one branch to R-FT176237 and reorganized the whole section using your results, including renaming R-FT176055 to R-FT174024. I think.

      It looks like the Time Tree hasn’t been updated since the manual correction was made. It knows that R-FT176055 was renamed to R-FT174024, but it doesn’t yet know that you were reassigned. FTDNA has been updating the Discover site only every one or two weeks.
      Thanks for your comments Nooni, then I think FTDNA will modify the Block diagram. There is R-FT176055 is on the top part and also R-FT174024 is in the next Block below.
      How do you find out that R-FT176055 was renamed to R-FT174024?

      At some point I did not appeared in the time tree. I think I cannot be placed on actual time connected to R-TF176237 because it would be a very long year distance.

      By the way my GG GF was born in Mexico in 1836 but I'm not sure about his F and GF, I think there is no doubt the patrilineal line moved from Europe to Mexico, I just dont know if they were from Portugal or Spain. I need Big Y matches from there to find out.
      And perhaps much more back in time the line could have been in Italy because there is an Italian shown in R-FT174024.



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      • #4
        It is possible that R-FT176055 was renamed to R-FT176237. It’s hard to know without seeing what the branches looked like before the changes. When I search for R-FT176055 on SNP Tracker, the SNP page shows R-FT174024, rather than R-FT176237 which now includes FT176055 in its definition. Likewise, R-FT176055 on the Time Tree highlights R-FT174024, and shows that you three had been together on that branch. You say that you were first assigned to R-FT176055, so that is likely the previous name for R-FT174024. Your Big Y test proved that the variant FT176055 was older in time than FTDNA had thought.

        The Block Tree is current. Keep an eye on the Discover tool because it should correct itself later.

        Remember that the Italian is your ancient cousin. So your ancestor could have moved from Italy to Iberia, or maybe the family was Iberian and a brother left for Italy. This split was probably during the Roman Empire around the 400s, so the countries back then were completely different. In any case the ancestral line is European, as you say.

        Yo también tengo la esperanza de que las pruebas nos den pistas sobre la procedencia de nuestros antepasados ibéricos (portugueses o gallegos? sefardíes o simplemente de ascendencia de Oriente Medio?). Pero me preocupa que para ello necesitemos más probadores nativos de Europa. Los escandinavos/nórdicos y algunos británicos tienen interés en la investigación con ADN. Los otros europeos ya saben que son españoles o griegos o lo que sea, así que para qué molestarse? La mayor parte de los probadores de FTDNA hasta ahora son inmigrantes americanos del norte, centro o sur que quieren saber más allá del siglo XIX. Con los resultados principalmente de los americanos, es difícil triangular entre los países ancestrales con fronteras fluctuantes.

        Waiting for matches definitely takes patience. Many people are not convinced of the benefit of a Big Y or mitochondrial test because there are few other testers to be matched to. Bless you for doing the Big Y even though no one else from your recent family line has tested yet. The more that people do advanced testing, the more that useful information will become available, like how your test revealed more details about the branching since the 400s. With data increasing through testing, hopefully undecided customers will choose to join us.​

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        • #5
          Today the time tree was modified and now I am the only person descending directly from R-FT176237 to present time.

          I guess RTDNA will not asign another SNP until someone else matches with me and a new SNP can be defined.

          My patrilinial ancestor 2,000 years ago should have a big family living today. It is just that those thousands cousins have not tested DNA-Y. Those cousins maybe living in Western Europe, of course there were millons migrating to América in the last 500 years but the larger part stayed there.

          I don't know the exact figure but in average there could be just one Big-Y tester per 50,000 males worldwide. USA and UK perhaps a much better number but Spain, Italy, France...I guess a much more lower frecuency.
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