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The Future of Big Y?

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  • The Future of Big Y?

    I realise that FTDNA probably won't be doing anything revolutionary with regards to Big Y for the time being, given how it hasn't even been a year since the jump from Big Y 500 to Big Y 700 was made.

    However after uploading my results to YFull, and realising that I've got over 50 one read SNPs, over 800 no calls, and 12 ambiguous SNPs, I'm already looking forward to getting the to next stage to cover these discrepancies, rather than testing each and every single SNP individually or reordering Big Y 700 in the hope that a second one might resolve these.

    Does anybody know how to keep up to date with FTDNA's developments on this? Has FTDNA published a roadmap or mentioned plans on eventually offering a fully comprehensive Y chromosome sequencing product in the future?

  • #2
    Same question. As I see by Big Y results - it has a good coverage just for about 79% of Y.
    I would really like to see some improvements for it, as seems it is very serious reason for me to wait and not do upgrades from Big Y 500.

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    • #3
      I think the question is whether more Y DNA data will be useful from a genealogical perspective. I have doubts! The limiting factor for genealogical research using Y DNA as it stands today (using Big Y or similar tests) is not the technology, but rather the sample size -- the number of men who have been tested. For me, and for many others, nobody close enough to my patrilineal ancestry has been tested. I only have relatively weak matches that don't lead anywhere, even with Big Y 700. If Big Y 900 comes along, I will probably take that test too, hoping that it will advance the understanding of the Y haplotree. But that won't change my matches.

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      • #4
        I ran a Big Y 700 on two of my kits but I am not doing anymore. I am more interested WGS, whole genome sequencing, and looking at those options.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by John McCoy View Post
          I think the question is whether more Y DNA data will be useful from a genealogical perspective. I have doubts! The limiting factor for genealogical research using Y DNA as it stands today (using Big Y or similar tests) is not the technology, but rather the sample size -- the number of men who have been tested. For me, and for many others, nobody close enough to my patrilineal ancestry has been tested. I only have relatively weak matches that don't lead anywhere, even with Big Y 700. If Big Y 900 comes along, I will probably take that test too, hoping that it will advance the understanding of the Y haplotree. But that won't change my matches.
          This upgrade to the Big Y700 worked out good for my paternal line. I asked my great nephew to do the Big Y 700, and we matched 6 new snps downstream of our previous terminal snp. We know from genealogy research that these new snps mutated between 1693-1902. I am amazed at how this all worked out, since I started testing 2009. I am actually adopted, so I was raised by a non-biological father, same situation for my great nephew. My great nephew's paternal great-grandfather was my birth father. Accurate genealogy along with dna testing can be successfull.

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          • #6
            In addition to the problem of how to get more men to take a comprehensive Y SNP-based test, there is also the problem of how to get the data into a single repository, so that men who were tested by different vendors can find each other. The Y DNA technology is sufficiently advanced that we can find real matches that are genealogically useful, but only if the results are searchable. Given the nature of the tests, and the complexity of the results, we need something like the old Ysearch, but better.

            We have come a long way since the days of when we attempted to make sense of matches using 12 STR's! The big problem in the early days (not that many years ago) was whether the matches were real. For the most part, they weren't, but it was possible even then to detect some useful clusters.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by John McCoy View Post
              In addition to the problem of how to get more men to take a comprehensive Y SNP-based test, there is also the problem of how to get the data into a single repository, so that men who were tested by different vendors can find each other. The Y DNA technology is sufficiently advanced that we can find real matches that are genealogically useful, but only if the results are searchable. Given the nature of the tests, and the complexity of the results, we need something like the old Ysearch, but better.

              We have come a long way since the days of when we attempted to make sense of matches using 12 STR's! The big problem in the early days (not that many years ago) was whether the matches were real. For the most part, they weren't, but it was possible even then to detect some useful clusters.

              Being a male adoptee, knowing only non-id info about my birth parents, I started back in 2009 w/67 marker test. I was very fortunate; because a gentlemen had already started a genealogy data base w/different branches of the same surname, and he contacted me to tell me I matched the W013 group with designated ancestor. So this bit of luck really helped me to get a good start. I could take up pages sharing all the dna testing & genealogy along with non id info; resulting in success of confirming my birth parents. There is some stuff that was hard to find out, but it is what it is.

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