Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Question on BigY Block Tree and MRCA

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Question on BigY Block Tree and MRCA

    Good afternoon:

    So, my Haplogroup was refined again today. It looks like I was put in a brand new group with one other individual with the last name of Hill (we had both previously been Q-L245 until I got my Y-700 results and I ended up reclassified as Q-FGC1891). The other man stayed at Q-L245, until today when we were both put in this new Haplogroup branch. I know there is supposedly a way to "read" the Big-Y block tree to determine how far back you and your match may reach a common ancestor. I am not sure how that works. Can someone look at the Block tree attached and let me know if there is a way to tell how far back to start looking for a common ancestor?

    Just trying to figure out where the most logical date range to start looking for that common ancestor. Let me add, this match and I DO NOT match on FamilyFinder.

    The TIP Report is helpful, but am not sure exactly where to start looking. Do I look at the generation that crosses the 50% possibility threshold? The TIP report with my other Big Y match shows the following:

    4 - 11.62%
    5 - 22.73%
    6 - 35.76%
    7 - 49.02%
    8 - 61.21%
    9 - 71.55%
    10 - 79.81%
    11 - 86.07%
    12 - 90.63%




    Big Y block tree results.JPG

  • #2
    Codeman432 . . . . I don’t see a reply to your question. I have the same question and so wonder if you’ve received an explanation from another source?

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Codeman432 View Post
      Good afternoon:

      So, my Haplogroup was refined again today. It looks like I was put in a brand new group with one other individual with the last name of Hill (we had both previously been Q-L245 until I got my Y-700 results and I ended up reclassified as Q-FGC1891). The other man stayed at Q-L245, until today when we were both put in this new Haplogroup branch. I know there is supposedly a way to "read" the Big-Y block tree to determine how far back you and your match may reach a common ancestor. I am not sure how that works. Can someone look at the Block tree attached and let me know if there is a way to tell how far back to start looking for a common ancestor?

      Just trying to figure out where the most logical date range to start looking for that common ancestor. Let me add, this match and I DO NOT match on FamilyFinder.

      The TIP Report is helpful, but am not sure exactly where to start looking. Do I look at the generation that crosses the 50% possibility threshold? The TIP report with my other Big Y match shows the following:

      4 - 11.62%
      5 - 22.73%
      6 - 35.76%
      7 - 49.02%
      8 - 61.21%
      9 - 71.55%
      10 - 79.81%
      11 - 86.07%
      12 - 90.63%




      Big Y block tree results.JPG

      I know in my own paternal line, genealogy & ydna testing has worked together. Even as an adoptee, I have been able to confirm who my birth father was; and I was fortunate that other men with the same surname started projects with extensive data base or researched genealogy themselves. My 8th cousin who shares the same paternal 7th great-grandfather with me worked for forty years to confirm our common ancestor's paternal line back to the 11th century. I started my dna testing back in 2009, since then I have confirmed my paternal line back to the 11th century, and maternal line back before 1700. In regard to the block tree, I know the appoximate age of my snp R-S7019 being 1492 or before, and I know that because a gentlemen who lives in Berkshire England shares the same ancestor with me who was born at Little Haywood, Staffordshire, England 1492, and he tested negative for R-BY17958, so I know this snp mutated between 1538-1672, because my 8th cousin tested positive for this. I tested positive for R-FGC65842 and my 8th cousin tested negative so I know that this snp mutated between 1693-1902.

      Just making the point that you have to know your genealogy along with ydna testing of relatives.

      Best regards, Douglas W. Fisher(Wells)
      Kit#122883

      Comment


      • #4
        "The TIP Report is helpful, but am not sure exactly where to start looking. Do I look at the generation that crosses the 50% possibility threshold? The TIP report with my other Big Y match shows the following:"

        The probability is stated as "not further than", which means at 90% probability the number of generations back to the common ancestor is no more than 12 generations. So In your case its 12 generations. 50% is just a coin flip, I would not use it. I like to use 75% as a minimum. So in your case its between 10 and 12 generations back in time is the common ancestor.

        Comment


        • #5
          Just to expound more on my points about genealogy & Big Y 700 testing:

          When should you use Big Y-700?



          The Big Y-700 test is most useful when you have solid paper trails for a paternal line and traditional YDNA testing with good matches going back at least 8 generations. This test can help you make genetic connections in the shadowy, pre-genealogical timeframe most people encounter at 10-20 generations, where records often don’t survive, surnames didn’t exist, and autosomal testing isn’t helpful.

          The “700” part of Big Y-700 can help make greater distinctions between lines you know are related: for example, help you distinguish your ancestor from among his three brothers. Lower-marker YDNA testing (even at the 111-level marker level) may not be able to answer that question for you. However, it will only be helpful if you can get you matches to take the test also. Having just your own Big Y results won’t be very insightful.

          My great-nephew, whose paternal great-grandfather was my birth father also did the Big Y 700 test, and we both matched six new snps, FGC65842 & five other "FT" snps, and we know these new snps mutated between 1693-1902. My paternal 4th cousin is testing these new snps at yseq, so we can determine their order better.

          My great nephew was raised by a non-biological father like myself, and we match up in family finder testing as well as 109/111 ydna along with the Big Y 700 results. We had to use genealogy in order to know our relation.

          Comment

          Working...
          X