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  • Why Big Y

    I am interested in furthering my genealogical research through DNA and I am also interested in what DNA tells me about my ancient origins. I am reading a couple of books on this, but my request is time sensitive. I have a sample that is decaying and I want to take advantage of the weekend sales.

    I did the Y-67 test with my brother, who is now deceased. The Haplogroup is predicted to be R-M269.

    I may be able to upgrade to another test using his DNA sample, but I have one shot at it. In other words, if I do an SNP test now, I may not be able to do any other test later, also my sample is getting old, so I need to decide now.

    I looked at Big Y. Whew! It is expensive! But if I don't do it, will I regret it?

    I have several questions

    1) What is the best way to find more info about this specific Haplogroup, R-M269, which is so general? Or is that all I can know? I am wondering why I am 27% Scandinavian when I know most of my surnames through my gg generation and they are all British Isles.

    2) If I do Big Y for my brother's sample, does that mean I do not have to do mtDNA? Or might he have different mtDNA because I get an X and he could get another X? If I do Big Y, can I tell from my AutoSomal test if got the same X?

    3) By doing Big Y, do I contribute in some way to other's research? I see where some projects say they want Big Y results. Is it just fun to have done Big Y and learn from the results? These would both be plusses for me.

    Thank you all for your expertise! I hope I will be able to contribute in the future instead of just ask.

    Marilyn Knapp Litt
    Last edited by mklitt; 25 November 2017, 12:17 PM.

  • #2
    Some answers or opinions to questions.

    1) Big Y gives lot of information. In this time and in future. It has novel variants which can lead to closer sub haplogroup(s) when there are other samples which have same dna. Big Y tests about 20 000 snps. Only minor part of them are valuable (positive to your dna). And you can send Big Y results to YFull test (with BAM file or url).

    2) You need to take mtdna test. Big Y tests y-dna and its different thing than mt-dna (which is in mitocondria). If you want to be very sure, you can test you and your brother that you two have over 1000 cM in match so you are real genetic siblings. Then if it is so, you can assume that your brothers y-dna is your fathers ydna. You have no y-dna. And you get X from your mother AND your father. Your brother gets X only from his mother.

    3) I have taken a survey on FTDNA and allowed my test results to science. But no answer has become. Is they given to science or not. I have sent my mt-dna (fasta) to GenBank. So there they are ready for science and haplogroup sharpen projects at PhyloTree.

    I am interested in, where I can send Big Y data for science. I have taken a YFull test / interpretation (to Big Y). It is something science.

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    • #3
      why is your test sample decaying, they should be good for hundred of years?

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      • #4
        mt-DNA tests are usually not very useful, except in certain situations where you want to know if two children had the same mother, and you have a direct maternal line from the hypothetical mother in both cases. Otherwise any two mt-DNA matches may have a common ancestor who lived tens of thousands of years ago. Your maternal haplogroup may be the only info your get from it.

        Mt-DNA has nothing to do with X chromosomes. X chromosomes are found in the nucleus of the cell. If you're a male, you get an X chromosome from your mother. If you're a female, you get one from your mother an one from your father.

        mt-DNA, on the other hand, is found in the mitochondria of the cell. Male and female children receive their mt-DNA from their mother. Only the females can pass it on to their children.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by ifiru View Post
          Some answers or opinions to questions.
          I am interested in, where I can send Big Y data for science. I have taken a YFull test / interpretation (to Big Y). It is something science.
          Yes. Same question. We have added all our mtDNA files to GenBank (thanks to Ian Logan) and are not sure where our Y files should go (if the tests are ever finished).

          Like you, Ifiru, we want all this time and money to also be a contribution to research. FTDNA seems to have made it very clear that they are only in the commercial genealogy business ... but as they do make our raw data available we just need to figure out how to share the files.

          Although the procedure is rather mysterious, it turns out that the mtDNA data for which people have given sharing consent (via "surveys") are not then automatically submitted to GenBank. Some of it eventually makes its way there, but after a delay of several years. (Being private, FTDNA does not have to abide by the data sharing guidelines followed by U.S. federally funded researchers - assuming I understand this correctly.)

          I don't know what happens to Y results, we have no experience with Y, but I don't have any confidence that filling out a "survey" will actually mean anything. If our data is going to go into a submitted paper - then when, and to where, and will I be able to access the publication via jstor or plos?

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          • #6
            I asked about the MtDNA because the ad for Big Y says:

            This Comprehensive Genome (male-specific) test includes ... a Full Mitochondrial Sequence, the most comprehensive and highest resolution mtDNA test available. Results identify the ethnic and geographic origins of your paternal and maternal lines.

            That made me think it would be testing his X and that I would have no way of knowing if it was the same as my X, unless I also took the test.

            Thank you everyone for the answers!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by mklitt View Post
              I asked about the MtDNA because the ad for Big Y says:

              This Comprehensive Genome (male-specific) test includes ... a Full Mitochondrial Sequence, the most comprehensive and highest resolution mtDNA test available. Results identify the ethnic and geographic origins of your paternal and maternal lines......
              Where is this ad??? No wonder you were confused.

              1) The family finder test will look at locations on your X as well as chromosomes 1 through 22. You and your brother will share a bunch of DNA, including some on the X. (He got an X from your mom, you got X's from both parents.) -- test both you and your brother (but test him only if there is a lot of sample left after you have done all the Y you can.)

              2) The mtDNA Full will test your complete mitochondrial DNA. The mtPlus less, just two specific regions. Whichever you chose, you only get this from your mother and there is no mixing/exchanging/rearrangement - so you and your brother should have exactly the same mtDNA. No need to test both of you. -- test only you or your brother, not both. (In this case, just yourself)

              2) The various Y DNA tests are designed to look for specific sequences on the Y chromosome, which you don't have. Only your brother could be tested. (I suppose with the big Y test they coincidentally pick up enough stray mitochondrial stuff that they might be able to estimate mt haplotype - but I don't think this is an advertised "feature" ??)-- you can test only your brother.

              Yeah, both big Y and the full mt DNA test can contribute to research. In this case do the mtDNA test on yourself, maybe later, use or save his precious sample for Y. (If you do a big Y this month you get Y-111 added for free, and if you do it, be sure to use a coupon as well.)
              Last edited by abuelita; 25 November 2017, 05:21 PM.

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              • #8
                The Comprehensive Genome Test is not the same as the BigY.

                The Comprehensive Genome Test is a combined package:

                "This Comprehensive Genome (male-specific) test includes Family Finder, our 67 marker Y-DNA test plus a Full Mitochondrial Sequence, the most comprehensive and highest resolution mtDNA test available. Results identify the ethnic and geographic origins of your paternal and maternal lines."

                The BigY is a large-scale YDNA SNP test:

                "The Big Y product is a Y-chromosome direct paternal lineage test. We have designed it to explore deep ancestral links on our common paternal tree. Big Y tests thousands of known branch markers as well as millions of places where there may be new branch markers. This product is intended for expert users with an interest in advancing science.

                It may also be of great interest to genealogy researchers of a specific lineage. However, it is not a test for matching you to one or more men with the same surname in the way that our Y-DNA37 and other tests do.?

                This explains the value of BigY:https://dna-explained.com/2017/11/17...he-big-y-test/

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                • #9
                  Marylin, sorry for your loss.

                  I've used 8 year old samples stored at FTDNA for additional testing with no problems.

                  As others have said, you can test your own mtDNA - no need to use any of your brother's sample for that. I have found mtDNA very useful for my personal testing goals, which include verifying maternal descent in an endogomous community (a lot of inter-marrying). If you plan to test your mtDNA, it's much cheaper to order the Full Mitochondrial Sequencing (FMS) now during the sale, than to first order the mtDNA Plus and then upgrade later. See the following link for shared FTDNA coupons.

                  https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...#gid=852393030


                  Assuming your parents are also gone (as well as other older relatives from previous generations), you could use his sample for Family Finder in addition to Big Y. Since you and he inherited different mixes of autosomal DNA from your parents, his results could differ from yours in both ethnicity estimates and cousin matching.

                  All the best!

                  Vinnie

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