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  • sharing Big Y results with yTree

    Out of curiousity:

    When a tester's Big Y results come in, do FT-DNA project admins make it a point to contact kit owners to recommend that they share their results on the yTree?

    kathy

  • #2
    Originally posted by GoofusBroadway View Post
    When a tester's Big Y results come in, do FT-DNA project admins make it a point to contact kit owners to recommend that they share their results on the yTree?
    By yTree, do you mean this haplotree which applies only to one subhaplogroup (R-P312)? I suspect that project administrators are not going to recommend it unless they are focused on that one specific subhaplogroup to the exclusion of all others.

    Comment


    • #3
      The Big Tree

      Yes. I should've been more specific. I did mean the "Big Tree".

      It seems that some (many?) R1b Big Y testers are unaware of this resource. I just thought it might be useful for admins to contact testers to let them know about it -- to keep testers from stumbling around and maybe missing it.

      I've contacted a couple men who're matches for my brother, but they haven't replied. Was thinking this sort of info might be better received from someone "in authority".

      kathy

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by GoofusBroadway View Post
        Yes. I should've been more specific. I did mean the "Big Tree".

        It seems that some (many?) R1b Big Y testers are unaware of this resource. I just thought it might be useful for admins to contact testers to let them know about it -- to keep testers from stumbling around and maybe missing it.

        I've contacted a couple men who're matches for my brother, but they haven't replied. Was thinking this sort of info might be better received from someone "in authority".

        kathy
        ftDNA has recently put a "New Survey" icon to click on that request my Big Y results are released to improve the Y Tree with new SNPs for NCBI.

        Not sure if it is in my best interest to complete the survey for NCBI or not.

        Anybody has some thoughts pro or con. Thanks

        Comment


        • #5
          @K.L. Adams: If you hadn't mentioned it, I would know nothing about NCBI. A quick internet search gives me enough information to be initially leary of it, but I'll read more. I couldn't tell from your reply whether you know about the Big Tree (http://www.ytree.net), but I expect you do.

          It seems to me that the Big Tree is a very useful place to share Big Y results. Alex analyzes the results and puts each tester in his position on the tree. It's a nice graphic that makes it easier to envision the descendancy of P312. To be added to the tree, a person first needs to know about it and must be willing to share his Big Y results.

          So my original question is still on the table: do R1b admins routinely contact testees to tell them about the Big Tree or leave it to the testees to find it on their own? I know it's mentioned in the R1b Yahoo groups.

          I have a selfish reason for asking, of course. My brother's kit is in FGC11388. I was kind of hoping we could drum up some more business.

          kathy

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by K. L. Adams View Post
            ftDNA has recently put a "New Survey" icon to click on that request my Big Y results are released to improve the Y Tree with new SNPs for NCBI.
            Exactly where do you see this?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by lgmayka View Post
              Exactly where do you see this?
              I remember answering that survey when I got my Big Y results last year. Or maybe it was when I ordered Big Y at the end of 2013. I had no problem agreeing to share my results for research purposes. NCBI is a government research entity - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by lgmayka View Post
                Exactly where do you see this?
                On your home account page (dashboard) look at your left hand bottom of the page. Icon has "New Survey" on top and on bottom "click here to take it now!".

                My icon is to the left of my "Big Y Results" and "Big Y Matches", which happens to be the last test I have taken.

                Hope that helps.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by MMaddi View Post
                  I remember answering that survey when I got my Big Y results last year. Or maybe it was when I ordered Big Y at the end of 2013. I had no problem agreeing to share my results for research purposes. NCBI is a government research entity - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/.
                  Mmaddi, Thanks for the info you provided NCBI.

                  I just never hear anything associated with these folks in my world of genealogical and genetic family research.

                  Perhaps others may opine with anything worthwhile these folks do for the common good.

                  I'll have to look at this a little longer before I turn my results over to the U.S. federal government.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by K. L. Adams View Post
                    Mmaddi, Thanks for the info you provided NCBI.

                    ...

                    Perhaps others may opine with anything worthwhile these folks do for the common good.
                    ...
                    NCBI is a part of NIH and I am a big fan. For bioinformatics to work well in genealogy and medicine lots of data is required and sharing our data is to me a rational and patriotic/humanitarian thing. I have a relative benefiting from the bioinformatic based treatment of cancer and I myself use a nosespray that I am bioinformatically suited for - I have a SNP that seems to indicate good results and no side effects. After years of use both are true for me. [Thanks SNP!] With Big Y it seems the more places I share, the more people working on it, the more I find out, and I hope for more years of questing amusement.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by JohnG View Post
                      NCBI is a part of NIH and I am a big fan. For bioinformatics to work well in genealogy and medicine lots of data is required and sharing our data is to me a rational and patriotic/humanitarian thing. I have a relative benefiting from the bioinformatic based treatment of cancer and I myself use a nosespray that I am bioinformatically suited for - I have a SNP that seems to indicate good results and no side effects. After years of use both are true for me. [Thanks SNP!] With Big Y it seems the more places I share, the more people working on it, the more I find out, and I hope for more years of questing amusement.
                      Is NCBI p***ing on our DNA data to big Pharma in order to develop new genetic drugs for the public or is NCBI researching new cures?

                      I would have thought your drugs came from Pfizer, Biogen, or some other pharma company?

                      I myself, have absolutely no problem providing my Big Y results to any non profit 501c type that is dedicated to provide medical cures.

                      I plan on doing some more DD on this government agency, before completing the survey.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by GoofusBroadway View Post
                        @K.L. Adams: If you hadn't mentioned it, I would know nothing about NCBI. A quick internet search gives me enough information to be initially leary of it, but I'll read more. I couldn't tell from your reply whether you know about the Big Tree (http://www.ytree.net), but I expect you do.

                        It seems to me that the Big Tree is a very useful place to share Big Y results. Alex analyzes the results and puts each tester in his position on the tree. It's a nice graphic that makes it easier to envision the descendancy of P312. To be added to the tree, a person first needs to know about it and must be willing to share his Big Y results.

                        So my original question is still on the table: do R1b admins routinely contact testees to tell them about the Big Tree or leave it to the testees to find it on their own? I know it's mentioned in the R1b Yahoo groups.

                        I have a selfish reason for asking, of course. My brother's kit is in FGC11388. I was kind of hoping we could drum up some more business.

                        kathy
                        Does look like Alex has done a lot of hard work his site. Is Alex or the web site ***ociated with an university or some other type of organization/corporation?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          @ K.L. Adams

                          First... I feel the same as you about handing over "my stuff" to a government entity. At least you're going a step further and investigating it.

                          Frankly, I don't know the answer to your question about Alex. Other than relying on testers to share their results and collaborating with project admins here, I get the impression he's a "one-man show" as far as his Big Tree is concerned.

                          Along with the Big Tree (http://www.ytree.net/), he has this website dedicated to the Little Scottish Cluster:
                          http://www.littlescottishcluster.com/index.html

                          I am unable to verify it at this moment in time (FT-DNA projects pages seem unavailable), but I think Alex is the admin for the Little Scottish Cluster project. As you can see, though, the Big Tree begins with R1b-P312, which includes a lot of yDNA real estate.

                          Hope this helps.
                          Kathy

                          p.s. As Mike Walsh says: "DNA testing is a team sport." Sharing and comparing our results with others is how we learn and make sense of it all. Otherwise, it's just a jumble of letters and numbers. -- k.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by GoofusBroadway View Post
                            @ K.L. Adams

                            First... I feel the same as you about handing over "my stuff" to a government entity. At least you're going a step further and investigating it.

                            Frankly, I don't know the answer to your question about Alex. Other than relying on testers to share their results and collaborating with project admins here, I get the impression he's a "one-man show" as far as his Big Tree is concerned.

                            Along with the Big Tree (http://www.ytree.net/), he has this website dedicated to the Little Scottish Cluster:
                            http://www.littlescottishcluster.com/index.html

                            I am unable to verify it at this moment in time (FT-DNA projects pages seem unavailable), but I think Alex is the admin for the Little Scottish Cluster project. As you can see, though, the Big Tree begins with R1b-P312, which includes a lot of yDNA real estate.

                            Hope this helps.
                            Kathy

                            p.s. As Mike Walsh says: "DNA testing is a team sport." Sharing and comparing our results with others is how we learn and make sense of it all. Otherwise, it's just a jumble of letters and numbers. -- k.
                            Hi Kathy,

                            It does seem like they are a lot of outstanding volunteers who are trying there best to fill voids and doing there best to analyze results for the folks.

                            It would seem that ftDNA or another commercial outfit would hire some of these folks to do this type of work with managing a standard haplo tree or perhaps even some type of 501c organization that would serve purpose.

                            This would allow maintained network servers to back up, protect and provide research data for many generations, if there was some type of entity to carry on long after we go to greener pastures.

                            We only have to look at what happen to the Sorenson Molecular Genealogy Foundation (SMGF)as to what happens with databases with a lot of important data.

                            http://www.smgf.org/

                            I myself am lucky to have some excellent R-U152 administrators to analyze my data.

                            Also, I hope I did not pick words that contain 3 letters in this post that cause a lot of ***

                            Warmest regards, Kevin

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Hi Kevin,

                              I didn't see any bleeped words. Good going!

                              FYI: Just a couple days ago, Alex wrote me he was looking for some more R-U152 fellas for his tree.

                              We do have some outstanding volunteers. The haplogroup admins are definitely on the ball. I have a brother in DF27, a son in L1335, and a 1st cousin once removed in L1335, so I've been availing myself of their services often.

                              Kathy

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