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How much can you learn about geography?

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  • Wing_Genealogis
    replied
    U106 tree

    The "little brother" to P312 is U106. Our Admin team is working on maintaining our own tree for the subclades of U106. This tree is available online at: https://app.box.com/s/afqsrrnvv2d51msqcz2o

    Any additions/corrections/comments/concerns/etc. should be directed to me: wing_genealogist (AT) yahoo (DOT) com

    Leave a comment:


  • dna
    replied
    http://www.ytree.net/ - I am impressed

    I am greatly impressed!

    However, I can see that is this clearly a bleeding edge research . I looked into the area I know a little bit about, and none of the 9 SNPs listed by FTDNA in the area were among 12 SNPs listed by www.ytree.net. While isogg.org/tree/ISOGG_HapgrpR.html has nothing there at all

    W. (Mr.)

    P.S.
    Out of 9 SNPs shown by FTDNA, one should not be listed at all (it was removed from the ISOGG tree last year), and possibly one more would be declared unreliable soon.

    Leave a comment:


  • 1798
    replied
    Originally posted by Earl Davis View Post
    It depends on how well tested your group is.

    Here is a group that shows early promise. You will notice at the bottom they have stared to be able in some cases to draw some early geographical hypothesis.

    http://www.ytree.net/DisplayTree.php?blockID=6

    That's not a group I am involved in but one that seems to be progressing well. I have personally tested two ancestral lines through BigY that have not so far been as revelatory. One has a number of distant matches but they are spread across Europe and range from Armenia to the British Isles so I just need to wait for many more people to test and start to shake out the clades that formed in the period 500-1,500 YBP. The other ancestral line I have put through BigY has proved to generally untested and has no matches beyond the ancient haplogroup we already knew that ancestral line belonged to.

    The best thing about BigY is that almost everyone results have something new to say about the human family tree. How recently relevant to you that is depends on a degree of luck in who has tested so far and what existing analysis has been carried out (there may be none for your group).
    I have looked at the link provided and all of the BigY SNPs seem to be in the proper sequence. Why can't FTDNA put the 43 YSNPs on the M269 level in the proper sequence? They are all mixed together.

    Leave a comment:


  • Earl Davis
    replied
    Originally posted by jtoml3 View Post
    Hi all,

    It's looking like I may need to get a Big Y. I'm most curious about where my paternal ancestors originated from, as I can only go back as far as 3rd great grandfather from Lincolnshire, England. Does the Big Y give you information about subclades and their geographical origins, or is it simply just the group and where you fit on the tree overall? (besides matches).

    I'm cautious of spending that much money on something that might not even answer my questions.
    It depends on how well tested your group is.

    Here is a group that shows early promise. You will notice at the bottom they have stared to be able in some cases to draw some early geographical hypothesis.

    http://www.ytree.net/DisplayTree.php?blockID=6

    That's not a group I am involved in but one that seems to be progressing well. I have personally tested two ancestral lines through BigY that have not so far been as revelatory. One has a number of distant matches but they are spread across Europe and range from Armenia to the British Isles so I just need to wait for many more people to test and start to shake out the clades that formed in the period 500-1,500 YBP. The other ancestral line I have put through BigY has proved to generally untested and has no matches beyond the ancient haplogroup we already knew that ancestral line belonged to.

    The best thing about BigY is that almost everyone results have something new to say about the human family tree. How recently relevant to you that is depends on a degree of luck in who has tested so far and what existing analysis has been carried out (there may be none for your group).
    Last edited by Earl Davis; 15 May 2015, 03:37 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • dna
    replied
    Originally posted by jtoml3 View Post
    Hi all,

    It's looking like I may need to get a Big Y. I'm most curious about where my paternal ancestors originated from, as I can only go back as far as 3rd great grandfather from Lincolnshire, England. Does the Big Y give you information about subclades and their geographical origins, or is it simply just the group and where you fit on the tree overall? (besides matches).

    I'm cautious of spending that much money on something that might not even answer my questions.
    DNA by itself does not carry any information about geographical origins.

    You always have to compare. By the way, with the Big Y test you are assured that you are comparing yourself to the right people!

    So if nobody from your subclade has tested, you might only learn about your ancestry thousands of years ago. If men from your subclade have tested and they have better information about geographical origins of their family than you do, you might learn quite a lot.

    W. (Mr.)

    Leave a comment:


  • jtoml3
    started a topic How much can you learn about geography?

    How much can you learn about geography?

    Hi all,

    It's looking like I may need to get a Big Y. I'm most curious about where my paternal ancestors originated from, as I can only go back as far as 3rd great grandfather from Lincolnshire, England. Does the Big Y give you information about subclades and their geographical origins, or is it simply just the group and where you fit on the tree overall? (besides matches).

    I'm cautious of spending that much money on something that might not even answer my questions.
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