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Story about New Mexico Spanish and Haplogroup K

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  • Story about New Mexico Spanish and Haplogroup K

    I just finished reading about a clan of Spanish people in New Mexico who took a DNA test because their was so much breast cancer in family, and not only found out that they carried the gene but also got the surprise of their life that they were really Jewish.

    The story is in the new Smithsonian mag. I think back to my results and always was told there was native american. If we don't do these tests then all will be lost to understand the migration and also are real heritage.

    Pam

  • #2
    Originally posted by pamelaw
    I just finished reading about a clan of Spanish people in New Mexico who took a DNA test because their was so much breast cancer in family, and not only found out that they carried the gene but also got the surprise of their life that they were really Jewish.

    The story is in the new Smithsonian mag. I think back to my results and always was told there was native american. If we don't do these tests then all will be lost to understand the migration and also are real heritage.

    Pam
    I believe there is some DNA evidence of that on FTDNA's New Mexico Project.

    I can no longer access that project. It runs a "script" which locks up my web browsers.

    Regards,
    Jim

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    • #3
      Originally posted by pamelaw
      I just finished reading about a clan of Spanish people in New Mexico who took a DNA test because their was so much breast cancer in family, and not only found out that they carried the gene but also got the surprise of their life that they were really Jewish.

      Pam
      Where did you see mention of haplogroup K? I didn't spot any discussion of mtDNA haplogroups in the article I read. The breast cancer mutation is in a gene BRCA1, located on chromosome 17, and it could be inherited from either parent.

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      • #4
        It mentioned about Ashkenazi Jews. Sorry if I said K.


        Expanding the DNA analysis, Sharon Graw, a University of Denver geneticist, confirmed that the mutation in the Hispanic patients from San Luis Valley exactly matched one previously found in Ashkenazi Jews from Central and Eastern Europe. The mutation, 185delAG, is a variant of a gene called BRCA1. When normal and healthy, BRCA1 helps to protect breast and ovarian cells from cancer. An extremely long gene, it has thousands of DNA letters, each corresponding to one of four chemical compounds that make up the genetic code and run down either strand of the DNA double helix; a "misspelling"

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